Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a situation where I need to call a method1() in class B from A. When method1() is called it creates a new Thread say(MyThread) and starts it immediately. In my case I am calling method1() from two different places in the application. I dont want to create a new instance of this thread every time. Inside method1() i tried checking if myThread.isAlive() before creating a new Instance of MyThread. But I get a compilation error MyThread needs to be initialized to call MyThread.isAlive(). So if put in a method property of type Thread ie.,

method() { Thread myThread; if(myThread.isAlive()) { return}; ..... }

Is it a good idea to declare a class level property in classB for Mythread and intialize it to null. Then inside method1() check the status of the thread if not running create a new one?

class B()
{
   Thread myThread = null;
   public static B getInstance()
   {
       return B singleton object;
   }

   public void method1()
   {
     if(myThread.isAlive())
        return;
     myThread = new Thread(new Runnable(){
       public void run(){ 
              do some stuff.....
       }).start();
}

==================

class A()
{
  B.getInstance().method1();
}

==================

class someOtherClass()
{
  B.getInstance().method1();
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can do better by using an Executor, specifically a fixed thread pool. Create your thread pool in B's constructor and keep a private final reference to it. Then submit the Runnables in method1(), don't start a new thread.

This approach has several benefits: the Executor correctly handles thread lifecycle issues for you, you can change the threading model to say increase threads very easily, and there aren't any race conditions (in the thread initialization code - thanks commenters for pointing this out). There can be race conditions inside the Runnable that you're using.

Edited to add an example:

   class B()
   {
   private final Executor threadPool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1);
   private boolean taskSubmmitted = false;
   public static B getInstance()
   {
       return B singleton object;
   }

   public synchronized void method1()
   {
     if(taskSubmitted)
        return;
     myRunnable = new Runnable(){
       public void run(){ 
              do some stuff.....
       }};
     threadPool.submit(myRunnable);
     taskSubmitted = true;
   }
share|improve this answer
    
Looks great! but can you please explain me a little bit more with modified code snippets of my code? please –  AKh Nov 11 '10 at 22:41
1  
You can learn about it yourself by reading the relevant Java Tutorials; e.g. download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/… –  Stephen C Nov 12 '10 at 0:10
1  
There may not be any race condition in starting the thread, but they're still there when executing the tasks, unless you use a single thread executor. –  Bart van Heukelom Nov 12 '10 at 12:36

This code will cause a NullPointerException (NPE) to be thrown when you first call method1, because it'll attempt to invoke isAlive() on null. You need if(myThread != null && myThread.isAlive())

share|improve this answer
    
Yes i forgot to mention that in the code.. but i actually have in place. –  AKh Nov 11 '10 at 22:39
class B()
{
          // class level variable works fine.... I dont see a problem 
  private Thread myThread = null;   

  public static B getInstance()
  {
    return B singleton object;
  }

  public void method1()
  {
     if(myThread != null && myThread.isAlive())
        return;

     myThread = new Thread(new Runnable(){        
      public void run(){ 
          do some stuff.....
      }).start();
   }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.