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I have just compiled this code: http://www.win32developer.com/tutorial/winsock/winsock_tutorial_2.shtm

I have added some codes so it does recv(), in an infinite loop. My problem, if there is no data to read, it still does not block.

Am I totally mistaken if I think recv should block in my case?

The code I have added is:

for(;;)
{
  char buffer[1000];
  memset(buffer,0,999);
  int inDataLength = recv(Socket,buffer,1000,0);

  int nError=WSAGetLastError();
  if(nError!=WSAEWOULDBLOCK&&nError!=0)
  {
    std::cout<<"Winsock error code: "<<nError<<"\r\n";
    std::cout<<"Client disconnected!\r\n";

    // Shutdown our socket
    shutdown(Socket,SD_SEND);

    // Close our socket entirely
    closesocket(Socket);

    break;
  }
}

It is at the end, after the std::cout<<"Client connected!\r\n\r\n"; line. I know I copied this from a "non blocking" example, but I dont think this code should do anything nonblocking really, still, my for loop is running like mad!

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1  
Could you paste the additional code you've written? –  chrisaycock Nov 11 '10 at 20:56
    
Are you using any WSAsync... calls? –  Rob Nov 11 '10 at 21:15
    
What kind of client do you have connecting to your server? –  chrisaycock Nov 11 '10 at 21:22
    
@chrisaycock: I connect to it via php. –  johnny-john Nov 12 '10 at 9:07
    
@Rob: I do not. –  johnny-john Nov 12 '10 at 9:09
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
if((nError == SOCKET_ERROR) || (nError == 0))
    WSAGetLastError();
else
    ; // handle success

That's how it should look, and not how you did it.

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Just to clarify: 'WSAEWOULDBLOCK' is good for non-blocking sockets. And, you should check WSAGetLastError() ONLY if the return code was 'SOCKET_ERROR' (-1). –  Poni Nov 11 '10 at 23:19
    
@Rob: How does nError get it's value then if i do not use WSAGetLastError()? –  johnny-john Nov 12 '10 at 9:05
    
@Poni: Sorry I meant Poni, not Rob. –  johnny-john Nov 12 '10 at 11:30
    
Easy Mike, see nError in its first usage (after the call to recv()) as in indicator - "did an error happen at all? if so, I should see what it is". And so it is, if nError, at first, would indicate that something went wrote then you just use WSAGetLastError() which will give extended info, and nError can take its value, making it to its second stage. If not using nError for the value returned by WSAGetLastError() then no problem, then nError was just an indicator. See next comment within a minute, I'll send you to the right page. –  Poni Nov 12 '10 at 17:54
    
Here, check the "Return Value" clause: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms740121%28VS.85%29.aspx –  Poni Nov 12 '10 at 17:55
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recv should block by default, unless there's a socket error or you explicitly set the socket to non-blocking. Be sure to check the return value for error. For more information see the Microsofts MSDN article on recv.

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The loop is not checking for errors correctly. It needs to be more like this instead:

char buffer[1000]; 
int inDataLength;

do 
    {
    inDataLength = recv(Socket, buffer, sizeof(buffer), 0); 
    if (inDataLength > 0)
        {
        // inDataLength number of bytes were received, use buffer as needed...
        continue;
        }

    if (inDataLength == 0)
        {
        std::cout << "Client disconnected!" << std::endl; 
        break;
        }

    int nError = WSAGetLastError(); 
    if (nError != WSAEWOULDBLOCK)
        {
        std::cout << "Winsock error code: " << nError << std::endl; 
        break;
        }

    // optionally call select() here to wait for the socket
    // to receive data before calling recv() again...
    /*
    fd_set fd;
    FD_ZERO(&fd);
    FD_SET(Socket, &fd);

    timeval tv;
    tv.tv_sec = ...;
    tv.tv_usec = ...;

    nError = select(Socket+1, &fd, NULL, NULL, &tv);
    if (nError == 0)
        {
        std::cout << "Timeout waiting for data" << std::endl; 
        break;
        }

    if (nError == SOCKET_ERROR)
        {
        nError = WSAGetLastError();
        std::cout << "Winsock error code: " << nError << std::endl; 
        break;
        }
    */
    } 
while (true);

// Shutdown our socket 
shutdown(Socket, SD_SEND); 

// Close our socket entirely 
closesocket(Socket); 
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