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Is there any method to generate MD5 hash of a string in Java?

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16  
Keep in mind that according to the recent research "MD5 should be considered cryptographically broken and unsuitable for further use". en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MD5 –  Zakharia Stanley May 3 '13 at 1:05
7  
It isn't duplicate. –  Felipe Micaroni Lalli Jul 3 '13 at 21:40

25 Answers 25

up vote 252 down vote accepted

MessageDigest is your friend. Call getInstance("MD5") to get an MD5 message digest you can use.

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26  
One thing that's not mentioned here, and caught me by surprise. The MessageDigest classes are NOT thread safe. If they're going to be used by different threads, just create a new one, instead of trying to reuse them. –  mjuarez Mar 7 '13 at 6:34
11  
It uses multiple methods to mutate its internal state. How can the lack of thread safety be surprising at all? –  Bombe Apr 25 '13 at 7:57
3  
@Bombe: why should we expect to have to know about MessageDigest's internal state? –  Dan Barowy Jul 1 at 14:10
1  
@DanBarowy well, you are mutating it (i.e. calling methods that do not return values but cause other methods to return different values) so until proven otherwise you should always assume that it’s not thread-safe to do so. –  Bombe Jul 9 at 18:17

The MessageDigest class can provide you with an instance of the MD5 digest.

When working with strings and the crypto classes be sure to always specify the encoding you want the byte representation in. If you just use string.getBytes() it will use the platform default. (Not all platforms use the same defaults)

import java.security.*;

..

byte[] bytesOfMessage = yourString.getBytes("UTF-8");

MessageDigest md = MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5");
byte[] thedigest = md.digest(bytesOfMessage);

If you have a lot of data take a look at the .update(byte[]) method which can be called repeatedly. Then call .digest() to obtain the resulting hash.

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8  
Is there any reason why you don't want to use "UTF-8" here? UTF-8 can represent all characters and if you use LATIN1 here, it would result in many, many non-Latin Strings producing exactly the same digest, which is far from optimal. –  Joachim Sauer Jan 7 '09 at 9:57
72  
Why, why, why do you explicitly warn to always specify the encoding and then explicitly pick the worst one available? Using Latin1, you're setting yourself up for very subtle bugs (it seems especially pointless when you can use UTF-8 just as easily).+1 for "specify encoding", -2 for "latin1" –  Piskvor Jan 7 '09 at 19:56
5  
(see joelonsoftware.com/articles/Unicode.html for much better rationale and explanation) –  Piskvor Jan 7 '09 at 19:57
3  
Apache commons coded use UTF-8 and this guys are knowing what they are doing –  FolksLord Jan 25 '11 at 10:22
8  
This topic is also useful if you need to convert the resulting bytes to hex string. –  weekens May 22 '12 at 7:25

You might also want to look at the DigestUtils class of the apache commons codec project, which provides very convenient methods to create MD5 or SHA digests.

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2  
In particular, the methods which return "safe" encoded representations of the byte data in string form. –  Rob Jan 7 '09 at 19:21
2  
However there is no easy way to get the DigestUtils class into your project without adding a ton of libs, or porting the class "per hand" which requires at least two more classes. –  iuiz Jul 23 '11 at 20:52
    
Can't find it in maven repos either. Grrrr. –  Spider Oct 4 '11 at 16:05
3  
Should be in the central Maven repositories, unless I'm going crazy: groupId=commons-codec artifactId=commons-codec version=1.5 –  Nick Spacek Oct 12 '11 at 17:10
3  
+1. you can download this from here commons.apache.org/codec –  dev Oct 12 '11 at 23:48

If you actually want the answer back as a string as opposed to a byte array, you could always do something like this:

String plaintext = "your text here";
MessageDigest m = MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5");
m.reset();
m.update(plaintext.getBytes());
byte[] digest = m.digest();
BigInteger bigInt = new BigInteger(1,digest);
String hashtext = bigInt.toString(16);
// Now we need to zero pad it if you actually want the full 32 chars.
while(hashtext.length() < 32 ){
  hashtext = "0"+hashtext;
}
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5  
@BalusC: Not true, the BigInteger.toString method will return the full number in the base specified. 0x0606 will be printed as 606, just trailing zeros are omitted, –  Spidey Aug 29 '10 at 22:29
8  
Minor nitpick: m.reset() isn't necessary right after calling getInstance. More minor: 'your text here' requires double-quotes. –  David Leppik Apr 19 '11 at 15:28

Found this:

public String MD5(String md5) {
   try {
        java.security.MessageDigest md = java.security.MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5");
        byte[] array = md.digest(md5.getBytes());
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
        for (int i = 0; i < array.length; ++i) {
          sb.append(Integer.toHexString((array[i] & 0xFF) | 0x100).substring(1,3));
       }
        return sb.toString();
    } catch (java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
    }
    return null;
}

on the site below, I take no credit for it, but its a solution that works! For me lots of other code didnt work properly, I ended up missing 0s in the hash. This one seems to be the same as PHP has. source: http://m2tec.be/blog/2010/02/03/java-md5-hex-0093

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6  
You should specify the encoding to be used in getBytes(), otherwise your code will get different results on different platforms/user settings. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jul 3 '11 at 21:57
    
@PaŭloEbermann does MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5"); not enough? I tried to add "MD5" in getBytes() but it returned an error –  Blaze Tama Feb 19 at 5:29
1  
@BlazeTama "MD5" is not an encoding, it is a message digest algorithm (and not one which should be used in new applications). An encoding is an algorithm pair which transforms bytes to strings and strings to bytes. An example would be "UTF-8", "US-ASCII", "ISO-8859-1", "UTF-16BE", and similar. Use the same encoding as every other party which calculates a hash of this string, otherwise you'll get different results. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 21 at 19:48

Here is how I use it:

final MessageDigest messageDigest = MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5");
messageDigest.reset();
messageDigest.update(string.getBytes(Charset.forName("UTF8")));
final byte[] resultByte = messageDigest.digest();
final String result = new String(Hex.encodeHex(resultByte));

where Hex is: org.apache.commons.codec.binary.Hex from the Apache Commons project.

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10  
If you use Apache Commons Codec anyway you can use: commons.apache.org/codec/api-release/org/apache/commons/codec/… –  squiddle Oct 25 '10 at 15:10
4  
I would replace last line with this: String result = Hex.encodeHexString(resultByte); –  bluish May 24 '11 at 9:35

I just downloaded commons-codec.jar and got perfect php like md5. Here is manual.

Just import it to your project and use

String Url = "your_url";

System.out.println( DigestUtils.md5Hex( Url ) );

and there you have it.

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Found this solution which is much cleaner in terms of getting a String representation back from an MD5 hash.

import java.security.*;
import java.math.*;

public class MD5 {
    public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception{
        String s="This is a test";
        MessageDigest m=MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5");
        m.update(s.getBytes(),0,s.length());
        System.out.println("MD5: "+new BigInteger(1,m.digest()).toString(16));
    }
}

The code was extracted from here.

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1  
Why has this answer -1 while the other, shorter and less descriptive answer has +146? –  Nilzor Feb 12 '13 at 12:17
3  
Nice using BigInteger to get a hex value +1 –  Dave.B Mar 14 '13 at 17:42
2  
I just found out that in some cases this only generates 31 characters long MD5 sum, not 32 as it should be –  kovica Mar 29 '13 at 14:09
1  
@kovica this is because, the starting zeros get truncated if I remember right.. String.format("%032x", new BigInteger(1, hash)); This should solve this. 'hash' is the byte[] of the hash. –  Heshan Perera Apr 1 '13 at 5:10

Bombe's answer is correct, however note that unless you absolutely must use MD5 (e.g. forced on you for interoperability), a better choice is SHA1 as MD5 has weaknesses for long term use.

I should add that SHA1 also has theoretical vulnerabilities, but not as severe. The current state of the art in hashing is that there are a number of candidate replacement hash functions but none have yet emerged as the standard best practice to replace SHA1. So, depending on your needs you would be well advised to make your hash algorithm configurable so it can be replaced in future.

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Could you point me to some resources, where i can read about relative merits and weaknesses of each? –  Akshay Jan 6 '09 at 10:19
    
Probably the best you can do at the moment is use SHA1 and be ready to replace it in future. You could use newer functions but they have not yet been subject to great amounts of research. You could track online security resources to find out when this changes - for example Bruce Schneier's blog. –  frankodwyer Jan 6 '09 at 10:49
2  
SHA1 is overkill unless you want a cryptographically secure hash, i.e. you don't want the hash to help in reconstructing the original message, nor do you want a clever attacker to create another message which matches the hash. If the original isn't a secret and the hash isn't being used for security, MD5 is fast and easy. For example, Google Web Toolkit uses MD5 hashes in JavaScript URLs (e.g. foo.js?hash=12345). –  David Leppik Apr 19 '11 at 15:14

Another option is to use the Guava Hashing methods:

Hasher hasher = Hashing.md5().newHasher();
hasher.putString("my string");
byte[] md5 = hasher.hash().asBytes();

Handy if you are already using Guava (which if you're not, you probably should be).

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My not very revealing answer:

private String md5(String s) {
    try {
        MessageDigest m = MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5");
        m.update(s.getBytes(), 0, s.length());
        BigInteger i = new BigInteger(1,m.digest());
        return String.format("%1$032x", i);         
    } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return null;
}
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good, no external libraries required –  pihentagy Mar 18 at 14:02
    
nice, +1 for String.format("%1$032x", i) –  alex May 23 at 15:05
    
and String.format("%1$032X", big) to have an uppercase format –  alex May 23 at 15:10

No need to make it too complicated. DigestUtils works fine and make you comfortable while working with md5 hashes.

DigestUtils.md5Hex(_hash);

or

DigestUtils.md5(_hash);

Either you can use any other encryption methods such as sha or md.

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Another implementation: Fast MD5 Implementation in Java

String hash = MD5.asHex(MD5.getHash(new File(filename)));
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This is a solid, standalone library with minimal dependencies. Good stuff. –  Ajax Mar 22 at 8:54

MD5 is perfectly fine if you don't need the best security, and if you're doing something like checking file integrity then security is not a consideration. In such as case you might want to consider something simpler and faster, such as Adler32, which is also supported by the Java libraries.

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1  
What makes you think file integrity is not a security issue? –  Jeremy Huiskamp Oct 13 '11 at 0:44

There is a DigestUtils class in Spring also:

http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.0.x/javadoc-api/org/springframework/util/DigestUtils.html

This class contains the method md5DigestAsHex() that does the job.

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I do not know if this is relevant for anyone reading this, but I just had the problem that I wanted to

  • download a file from a given URL and
  • compare its MD5 to a know value.

I wanted to do it with JRE classes only (no Apache Commons or similar). A quick web search did not show me sample code snippets doing both at the same time, only each task separately. Because this requires to read the same file twice, I figured it might be worth the while to write some code which unifies both tasks, calculating the checksum on the fly while downloading the file. This is my result (sorry if it is not perfect Java, but I guess you get the idea anyway):

import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.math.BigInteger;
import java.net.URL;
import java.nio.ByteBuffer;
import java.nio.channels.Channels;
import java.nio.channels.ReadableByteChannel;
import java.nio.channels.WritableByteChannel;
import java.security.DigestOutputStream;        // new
import java.security.MessageDigest;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;

void downloadFile(String fromURL, String toFile, BigInteger md5)
    throws IOException, NoSuchAlgorithmException
{
    ReadableByteChannel in = Channels.newChannel(new URL(fromURL).openStream());
    MessageDigest md5Digest = MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5");
    WritableByteChannel out = Channels.newChannel(
        //new FileOutputStream(toFile));  // old
        new DigestOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(toFile), md5Digest));  // new
    ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(1024 * 1024);  // 1 MB

    while (in.read(buffer) != -1) {
        buffer.flip();
        //md5Digest.update(buffer.asReadOnlyBuffer());  // old
        out.write(buffer);
        buffer.clear();
    }

    BigInteger md5Actual = new BigInteger(1, md5Digest.digest()); 
    if (! md5Actual.equals(md5))
        throw new RuntimeException(
            "MD5 mismatch for file " + toFile +
            ": expected " + md5.toString(16) +
            ", got " + md5Actual.toString(16)
        );
}
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Oh BTW, before anyone except for myself notices how bad my JRE knowledge really is: I just discovered DigestInputStream and DigestOutputStream. I am going to edit my original solution to reflect what I have just learned. –  kriegaex Jun 26 '12 at 8:45

Another implementation:

import javax.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter;

String hash = DatatypeConverter.printHexBinary( 
           MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5").digest("SOMESTRING".getBytes("UTF-8")));
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Take a look at the following link, the Example gets an MD5 Hash of a supplied image: MD5 Hash of an Image

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You can try following. and there's an online generator: http://hashgenerators.com/

import java.security.MessageDigest;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;

public class MD5Example {

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

    final String inputString = "Hello MD5";

    System.out.println("MD5 hex for '" + inputString + "' :");
    System.out.println(getMD5Hex(inputString));
}

public static String getMD5Hex(final String inputString) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException {

    MessageDigest md = MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5");
    md.update(inputString.getBytes());

    byte[] digest = md.digest();

    return convertByteToHex(digest);
}

private static String convertByteToHex(byte[] byteData) {

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < byteData.length; i++) {
        sb.append(Integer.toString((byteData[i] & 0xff) + 0x100, 16).substring(1));
    }

    return sb.toString();
}
}
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There is an article on JavaBlogging about that. Check out: http://www.javablogging.com/sha1-and-md5-checksums-in-java/

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For what it's worth, I stumbled upon this because I want to synthesize GUIDs from a natural key for a program that will install COM components; I want to syhthesize so as not to manage GUID lifecycle. I'll use MD5 and then use the UUID class to get a string out of it. (http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2190890/how-can-i-generate-guid-for-a-string-values/12867439 raises this issue).

In any case, java.util.UUID can get you a nice String from the MD5 bytes.

return UUID.nameUUIDFromBytes(md5Bytes).toString();
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I have a Class (Hash) to convert plain text in hash in formats: md5 or sha1, simillar that php functions (md5, sha1):

public class Hash {
    /**
     * 
     * @param txt, text in plain format
     * @param hashType MD5 OR SHA1
     * @return hash in hashType 
     */
    public static String getHash(String txt, String hashType) {
        try {
                    java.security.MessageDigest md = java.security.MessageDigest.getInstance(hashType);
                    byte[] array = md.digest(txt.getBytes());
                    StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
                    for (int i = 0; i < array.length; ++i) {
                        sb.append(Integer.toHexString((array[i] & 0xFF) | 0x100).substring(1,3));
                 }
                    return sb.toString();
            } catch (java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
                //error action
            }
            return null;
    }

    public static String md5(String txt) {
        return Hash.getHash(txt, "MD5");
    }

    public static String sha1(String txt) {
        return Hash.getHash(txt, "SHA1");
    }
}

Testing with JUnit and PHP

PHP Script:

<?php

echo 'MD5 :' . md5('Hello World') . "\n";
echo 'SHA1:' . sha1('Hello World') . "\n";

Output PHP script:

MD5 :b10a8db164e0754105b7a99be72e3fe5
SHA1:0a4d55a8d778e5022fab701977c5d840bbc486d0

Using example and Testing with JUnit:

    public class HashTest {

    @Test
    public void test() {
        String txt = "Hello World";
        assertEquals("b10a8db164e0754105b7a99be72e3fe5", Hash.md5(txt));
        assertEquals("0a4d55a8d778e5022fab701977c5d840bbc486d0", Hash.sha1(txt));
    }

}

Code in GitHub

https://github.com/fitorec/java-hashes

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Thanks a lot ! That's exactly what I was looking for :D –  Cedric Simon 20 hours ago
 import java.math.BigInteger;
 import java.security.MessageDigest;
 import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;

/**
* MD5 encryption
*
* @author Hongten
*
*/
public class MD5 {

 public static void main(String[] args) {
     System.out.println(MD5.getMD5("123456"));
 }

 /**
  * Use md5 encoded code value
  *
  * @param sInput
  * clearly
  * @ return md5 encrypted password
  */
 public static String getMD5(String sInput) {

     String algorithm = "";
     if (sInput == null) {
         return "null";
     }
     try {
         algorithm = System.getProperty("MD5.algorithm", "MD5");
     } catch (SecurityException se) {
     }
     MessageDigest md = null;
     try {
         md = MessageDigest.getInstance(algorithm);
     } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
         e.printStackTrace();
     }
     byte buffer[] = sInput.getBytes();

     for (int count = 0; count < sInput.length(); count++) {
         md.update(buffer, 0, count);
     }
     byte bDigest[] = md.digest();
     BigInteger bi = new BigInteger(bDigest);
     return (bi.toString(16));
 }
}

There is an article on Codingkit about that. Check out: http://codingkit.com/a/JAVA/2013/1020/2216.html

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def md5(s:String)={
    MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5").digest(s.getBytes()).map({
        c => Integer.toHexString(c&0xFF)
    }).mkString
}
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5  
This is wrong. First please note that the question is tagged java, not scala. But the real bummer is that your snippet strips the leading zero of your bytes. Quick proof: md5( "").length returns 29, it should be 32. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Feb 12 at 14:38

I did this... Seems to work ok - I'm sure somebody will point out mistakes though...

public final class MD5 {
public enum SaltOption {
    BEFORE, AFTER, BOTH, NONE;
}
private static final String ALG = "MD5";
//For conversion to 2-char hex
private static final char[] digits = {
    '0' , '1' , '2' , '3' , '4' , '5' ,
    '6' , '7' , '8' , '9' , 'a' , 'b' ,
    'c' , 'd' , 'e' , 'f' , 'g' , 'h' ,
    'i' , 'j' , 'k' , 'l' , 'm' , 'n' ,
    'o' , 'p' , 'q' , 'r' , 's' , 't' ,
    'u' , 'v' , 'w' , 'x' , 'y' , 'z'
};

private SaltOption opt;

/**
 * Added the SaltOption constructor since everybody
 * has their own standards when it comes to salting
 * hashes.
 * 
 * This gives the developer the option...
 * 
 * @param option The salt option to use, BEFORE, AFTER, BOTH or NONE.
 */
public MD5(final SaltOption option) {
    //TODO: Add Char Encoding options too... I was too lazy!
    this.opt = option;
}

/**
 * 
 * Returns the salted MD5 checksum of the text passed in as an argument.
 * 
 * If the salt is an empty byte array - no salt is applied.
 * 
 * @param txt The text to run through the MD5 algorithm.
 * @param salt The salt value in bytes.
 * @return The salted MD5 checksum as a <code>byte[]</code>
 * @throws NoSuchAlgorithmException
 */
private byte[] createChecksum(final String txt, final byte[] salt) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException {
    final MessageDigest complete = MessageDigest.getInstance(ALG);
    if(opt.equals(SaltOption.BEFORE) || opt.equals(SaltOption.BOTH)) {
        complete.update(salt);
    }
    complete.update(txt.getBytes());
    if(opt.equals(SaltOption.AFTER) || opt.equals(SaltOption.BOTH)) {
        complete.update(salt);
    }
    return complete.digest();
}

/**
 * 
 * Returns the salted MD5 checksum of the file passed in as an argument.
 * 
 * If the salt is an empty byte array - no salt is applied.
 * 
 * @param fle The file to run through the MD5 algorithm.
 * @param salt The salt value in bytes.
 * @return The salted MD5 checksum as a <code>byte[]</code>
 * @throws IOException
 * @throws NoSuchAlgorithmException
 */
private byte[] createChecksum(final File fle, final byte[] salt)
        throws IOException, NoSuchAlgorithmException {
    final byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
    final MessageDigest complete = MessageDigest.getInstance(ALG);
            if(opt.equals(SaltOption.BEFORE) || opt.equals(SaltOption.BOTH)) {
            complete.update(salt);
        }
    int numRead;
    InputStream fis = null;
    try {
        fis = new FileInputStream(fle);
        do {
            numRead = fis.read(buffer);
            if (numRead > 0) {
                complete.update(buffer, 0, numRead);
            }
        } while (numRead != -1);
    } finally {
    if (fis != null) {
            fis.close();
        }
    }
            if(opt.equals(SaltOption.AFTER) || opt.equals(SaltOption.BOTH)) {
            complete.update(salt);
        }
    return complete.digest();
}

/**
 * 
 * Efficiently converts a byte array to its 2 char per byte hex equivalent.
 * 
 * This was adapted from JDK code in the Integer class, I just didn't like
 * having to use substrings once I got the result...
 *
 * @param b The byte array to convert
 * @return The converted String, 2 chars per byte...
 */
private String convertToHex(final byte[] b) {
    int x;
    int charPos;
    int radix;
    int mask;
    final char[] buf = new char[32];
    final char[] tmp = new char[3];
    final StringBuilder md5 = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < b.length; i++) {
        x = (b[i] & 0xFF) | 0x100;
        charPos = 32;
        radix = 1 << 4;
        mask = radix - 1;
        do {
            buf[--charPos] = digits[x & mask];
            x >>>= 4;
        } while (x != 0);
        System.arraycopy(buf, charPos, tmp, 0, (32 - charPos));
        md5.append(Arrays.copyOfRange(tmp, 1, 3));
    }
    return md5.toString();
}

/**
 * 
 * Returns the salted MD5 checksum of the file passed in as an argument.
 * 
 * @param fle The file you want want to run through the MD5 algorithm.
 * @param salt The salt value in bytes
 * @return The salted MD5 checksum as a 2 char per byte HEX <code>String</code>
 * @throws NoSuchAlgorithmException
 * @throws IOException
 */
public String getMD5Checksum(final File fle, final byte[] salt)
        throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, IOException {
    return convertToHex(createChecksum(fle, salt));
}

/**
 * 
 * Returns the MD5 checksum of the file passed in as an argument.
 * 
 * @param fle The file you want want to run through the MD5 algorithm.
 * @return The MD5 checksum as a 2 char per byte HEX <code>String</code>
 * @throws NoSuchAlgorithmException
 * @throws IOException
 */
public String getMD5Checksum(final File fle)
        throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, IOException {
    return convertToHex(createChecksum(fle, new byte[0]));
}

/**
 * 
 * Returns the salted MD5 checksum of the text passed in as an argument.
 * 
 * @param txt The text you want want to run through the MD5 algorithm.
 * @param salt The salt value in bytes.
 * @return The salted MD5 checksum as a 2 char per byte HEX <code>String</code>
 * @throws NoSuchAlgorithmException
 * @throws IOException
 */
public String getMD5Checksum(final String txt, final byte[] salt)
        throws NoSuchAlgorithmException {
    return convertToHex(createChecksum(txt, salt));
}

/**
 * 
 * Returns the MD5 checksum of the text passed in as an argument.
 * 
 * @param txt The text you want want to run through the MD5 algorithm.
 * @return The MD5 checksum as a 2 char per byte HEX <code>String</code>
 * @throws NoSuchAlgorithmException
 * @throws IOException
 */
public String getMD5Checksum(final String txt)
        throws NoSuchAlgorithmException {

    return convertToHex(createChecksum(txt, new byte[0]));
}
}
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