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Would you mix MFC with STL? Why?

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13 Answers 13

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Sure. Why not?

I use MFC as the presentation layer, even though the structures and classes in the back-end use STL.

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Use STL whenever you can, use MFC when no alternative

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I mix them all the time. The only minor PITA was serialization - the MFC containers (CArray, CList, CStringArray, etc.) support CArchive serialization, but when using STL containers you have to roll your own code. In the end I switched to using boost::serialization and dumped the MFC CArchive stuff.

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Yes, I have mixed them before without problems. However, after using MFC for over a decade, I would never consider using it for a new project.

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For collections in the data layer. I have no data to support this, but my suspicion is that the templated STL collections are more performant than their MFC counterparts.

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Yes, the STL containers are faster than MFC collections. –  Ron Jan 6 '09 at 12:59

Yes I do mix 'em because I find MFC too unwieldy for normal natural looking c++. Though you might have to write some code for conversions where your STL code talks to MFC code.

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It was a very bad idea before Visual Studio 2003's (nearly) full support for the C++ Standard. Now it's not a bad idea at all. Whether it's a good idea depends on the context and what the skillset of your team is.

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Yes, if both of the following conditions hold:

1) The language chosen for the project is C++ (which, of course, includes the STL - the S in the STL is for "Standard").

2) After a careful analysis, no better alternative is found or considered appropriate for the GUI support than MFC, and my development team goes for it.

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It depends on what your definition of "mixing" is. If you simply mean creating a project that uses both STL and MFC I don't see any harm in that at all. They serve a different purpose.

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when mixing STL with other microsoft headers, be sure to define NOMINMAX, otherwise your std::min function will be garbled into a syntax error because of the min(a,b) macro.

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You should not use standard exceptions in an MFC application - your app might hang if you throw it inside a dialog. See this question for the reasons: Why does my MFC app hang when I throw an exception?

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I use MFC for all my C++ projects, since none of my projects are console. MFC is elegant solution for Windows C++ developers. I hate QT, and I wont use WX on Windows. I dont care about portability, since my applications are only for Windows. I love MFC/ATL's CString class, std::string is very raw, doesn't have any "String" features in it. std::string is nothing more than vector<char>.

For all data storage and algorithms, I use STL. I do also use ConcRT PPL template classes, which are very much same as STL.

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I prefer to avoid STL and not to use it because it used to be not so standard when MFC was de-facto standard for about a decade. Also until recent versions of Visual C++ (and "standard" STL), MFC just have better performance.

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protected by Bo Persson Jan 27 '12 at 22:03

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