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I hope someone can help me out with this. I'd like to measure sorting algorithms. Here's how I currently do it:

M = 1000 # number of executions
N = [1000, 2000, 4000, 16000] # size of the list
L = [100, 1000, 2000,16000] # max element of the list

# timing:
print 'Number of executions: %i' % (M)
print '-'*80
print '\tL\N\t|\t%i\t|\t%i\t|\t%i\t|\t%i' % (N[0], N[1], N[2], N[3])
print '-'*80
for l in L:
    print '\t%i\t' % l,
    for n in N: 
        t = 0
        for m in xrange(M):
            A = [random.randint(0,l-1) for r in xrange(n)] # generates an n long random list
            t0 = time.clock()
            pass # sort function call goes here
            t1 = time.clock()
            t += (t1-t0)
        print '|\t%0.3f\t' % ((t*1000.0)/M ), # avg time
    print
print '-'*80

This empty test takes about 4 minutes. I would appreciate any advice on how to make it faster.

Cheers

Edit: After Rafe Kettler's hint, I came up with this:

def sorting(LST):
    pass

if __name__ == "__main__" :
    M = 1000
    N = [1000, 2000, 4000, 16000]
    L = [100, 1000, 2000,16000]

    print 'Number of executions: %i' % (M)
    print '-'*80
    print '\tL\N\t|\t%i\t|\t%i\t|\t%i\t|\t%i' % (N[0], N[1], N[2], N[3])
    print '-'*80
    for l in L:
        print '\t%i\t' % l,
        for n in N:
            #------------------------
            t = timeit.Timer('sorting([random.randint(0,l-1) for r in xrange(n)])', 'from __main__ import sorting, n, l, random')
            #------------------------
            print '|\t%0.3f\t' % (t.timeit(M)/M ), # avg time
        print
    print '-'*80

Unfortunately it become slower. What am I doing wrong?

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5 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

timeit. Best way to time in Python, period. Refactor your algorithms into functions and use timeit to test the execution time.

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3  
And be sure to setup your test data outside the timed function! –  Mark Ransom Nov 11 '10 at 22:48
    
@MarkRansom agreed. –  Rafe Kettler Nov 11 '10 at 22:54
    
Thanks for the heads-up on timeit! –  Stiggo Nov 12 '10 at 11:12
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It is possible for you replace this code:

A = [random.randint(0,l-1) for r in xrange(n)]

With generator? eg

def A(n):
    for r in xrange(n):
        yield random.randint(0,l-1)

I think, most of time in your empty test is random list generation

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1  
Generator expressions: A = (random.randint(0,l-1) for r in xrange(n)) –  codewarrior Nov 12 '10 at 1:46
    
I've tried with [] and () and ther's only few second between them. I know generating random numbers is time-consuming task. But it must be a faster way. I haven't found it yet. I hope I will. –  Stiggo Nov 12 '10 at 19:36
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Creating random numbers is a time-consuming task. You're creating 4*1000*(1000+2000+4000+16000) of them. The simplest possible test case takes over 7 minutes on my system:

>>> t=timeit.Timer('random.randint(0,15999)','import random')
>>> t.timeit(4*1000*(1000+2000+4000+16000))
447.08869618904077

As I said in a comment, it's extremely important to exclude the timings for creating your test data from the timings of the algorithm under test.

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I know it's 92.000.000 random number and takes a lot of time. But at the moment I don't know how can I generate a new random list for every repetition. I'd like to use a new imput list for every 1000 * 4 time for "accuracy" (or "more deitalied picture" sorry I don't know the right english expression) . –  Stiggo Nov 15 '10 at 17:43
    
@Stiggo, I'm not suggesting that you change the way you generate your test data, just explaining that it's going to take a long time no matter how you do it. Just change the parameters of your test so that the data generation is not counted, and accept the fact that it will take a long time to run. –  Mark Ransom Nov 15 '10 at 18:49
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Generate the random numbers once. Put them in a shelve or pickle file and then read them out when you need to run a test.

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Not quite answering the timimg question, but you can use the random module in numpy package to generate large array of random numbers very effeciently:

>>> from numpy import random
>>> l = 100; n = 16000
>>> random.randint(0,l-1,n)

Adapting OP's script, below is comparision of total time using numpy.random v.s. stock random module:

numpy.random
number of executions: 1000
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        L\N     |       1000    |       2000    |       4000    |       16000
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        100     |       0.022   |       0.043   |       0.084   |       0.332
        1000    |       0.016   |       0.031   |       0.059   |       0.231
        2000    |       0.016   |       0.030   |       0.059   |       0.231
        16000   |       0.016   |       0.030   |       0.059   |       0.231
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

random 
Number of executions: 1000
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        L\N     |       1000    |       2000    |       4000    |       16000
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        100     |       2.152   |       4.271   |       8.649   |       34.007
        1000    |       2.264   |       4.501   |       8.762   |       34.956
        2000    |       2.202   |       4.412   |       8.743   |       34.818
        16000   |       2.205   |       4.398   |       8.735   |       34.823
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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