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Does the Scala library provide any support for lifting a method of a given type to a function value?

For example, suppose I want to lift String.length. I can write

val f: String => Int = _.length

or

val f = { s: String => s.length }

However, this syntax is not always ideal (particularly in the midst of a larger expression). I think I'm looking for something that will enable expressions like

Lift[String](_.length)
Lift[Option[Int]].lift(_.filter)

and I have in mind something like this:

class Lift[T] {                                                          
   def apply[R](f: T => R): T => R = f

   def lift[A, R](f: (T) => (A) => R): (T, A) => R = 
         f(_)(_) 
   def lift[A1, A2, R](f: (T) => (A1, A2) => R): (T, A1, A2) => R =
         f(_)(_,_)
   // ... etc. ...
}
object Lift {
   def apply[T] = new Lift[T]
}

Question 1: Does the standard library (or any library) provide something like this?

Question 2: If not, is it possible to write it in such a way that Option.filter can be lifted as above (rather than as Lift[Option[Int]].lift[Int => Boolean, Option[Int]](_.filter))? Without supplying the type parameters on the lift method I get the following error:

error: missing parameter type for expanded function ((x$1) => x$1.filter)
       Lift[Option[Int]].lift(_.filter)
                              ^

Update:

Apparently, the problem I'm running in to has something to do with the overloaded lift method. If I rename the overloads, I can lift Option.filter without all the extra type parameters.

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3 Answers 3

What is the problem with

(_: String).length
(_: Option[Int]).filter _

?

share|improve this answer
    
That should be (_: Option[Int]).filter _ (mind the trailing underscore!) –  michid Nov 12 '10 at 10:47
    
@michid Corrected, thanks. –  Daniel C. Sobral Nov 12 '10 at 10:59
    
Not bad. I'm hoping to get a fully uncurried form, but I may have to settle for this. –  Aaron Novstrup Nov 12 '10 at 20:42
1  
I came up with a solution that provides a single lift function with syntax at least as simple as this, but that also gives the caller control over the form of the lifted function (curried, partly curried, or uncurried). See stackoverflow.com/questions/4160239/lifting-methods-in-scala/… if you're interested. –  Aaron Novstrup Nov 19 '10 at 7:12
    
@DanielC.Sobral, how can I read the result of the latter function in your answer? In my example, I set g() equal to it. scala> g(Some(3)) res23: (Int => Boolean) => Option[Int] = <function1> –  Kevin Meredith Sep 9 '13 at 2:48
up vote 7 down vote accepted

I finally came up with a solution that I'm happy with. This version supports simple syntax and a single entry point to the API, while also providing control over the form of the lifted function (i.e. uncurried, partly curried, or fully curried).

Examples:

I'll use the following class definition in the examples below:

class Foo {
   def m1: Int = 1
   def m2(i: Int): Int = i
   def m3(i: Int, j: Int): Int = i + j
}

The simplest form of lifting is to return the method as a partially applied function, equivalent to invoking ((_: Foo).method _):

scala> lift[Foo](_.m1)                         // NOTE: trailing _ not required
res0: (Foo) => Int = <function1>

scala> lift[Foo](_.m2 _)                       // NOTE: trailing _ required
res1: (Foo) => (Int) => Int = <function1>

scala> lift[Foo](_.m3 _)
res2: (Foo) => (Int, Int) => Int = <function1> // NOTE: the result is partly curried

By importing some implicits, one can request curried or uncurried forms:

scala> {                        
     | import CurriedLiftables._
     | lift[Foo](_.m3 _)        
     | }
res3: (Foo) => (Int) => (Int) => Int = <function1>

scala> {                          
     | import UncurriedLiftables._
     | lift[Foo](_.m3 _)          
     | }
res4: (Foo, Int, Int) => Int = <function3>

Implementation:

class Lift[T] {
   def apply[R,F](f: T => R)(implicit e: (T => R) Liftable F): F = e.lift(f)
}
object lift {
   def apply[T] = new Lift[T]
}

class Liftable[From, To](val lift: From => To)

class DefaultLiftables {
   implicit def lift[F]: F Liftable F = new Liftable(identity)
}
object Liftable extends DefaultLiftables

class UncurriedLiftable1 extends DefaultLiftables {
   implicit def lift1[T, A, R]: (T => A => R) Liftable ((T, A) => R) = 
      new Liftable( f => f(_)(_) )
}
class UncurriedLiftable2 extends UncurriedLiftable1 {
   implicit def lift2[T, A1, A2, R]: (T => (A1, A2) => R) Liftable ((T, A1, A2) => R) = 
      new Liftable ( f => f(_)(_,_) )
}
// UncurriedLiftable3, UncurriedLiftable4, ...
object UncurriedLiftables extends UncurriedLiftable2

class CurriedLiftable2 extends DefaultLiftables {
   implicit def lift2[T, A1, A2, R]: (T => (A1, A2) => R) Liftable (T => A1 => A2 => R) =
      new Liftable( f => (x: T) => (a1: A1) => (a2: A2) => f(x)(a1, a2) )
}
// CurriedLiftable3, CurriedLiftable4, ...
object CurriedLiftables extends CurriedLiftable2

My previous solution required a separate lift method for each arity:

import Lift._
val f1 = lift0[String](_.length)
val f2 = lift1[Option[Int]](_.filter)
val f3 = lift2[Either[String, Int]](_.fold)

Implementation:

class Lift0[T] {
   def apply[R](f: T => R): T => R = f
}
class Lift1[T] {
   def apply[A, R](f: (T) => (A) => R): (T, A) => R = 
      f(_)(_) 
}
class Lift2[T] {
   def apply[A1, A2, R](f: (T) => (A1, A2) => R): (T, A1, A2) => R =
      f(_)(_,_)
}
// ... etc. ...

object Lift {
   def lift0[T] = new Lift0[T]
   def lift1[T] = new Lift1[T]
   def lift2[T] = new Lift2[T]
   // ... etc. ...
}
share|improve this answer

Passing in filter as partially applied method seems to do the job:

scala> class Lift[T] {                                        
     |    def apply[R](f: T => R): T => R = f
     | }
defined class Lift

scala> object Lift {
     |    def apply[T] = new Lift[T]
     | }
defined module Lift

scala> val ls = Lift[String](_.length)
ls: (String) => Int = <function1>

scala> val los = Lift[Option[Int]](_.filter _)     
los: (Option[Int]) => ((Int) => Boolean) => Option[Int] = <function1>
share|improve this answer
    
This works, but I was hoping to get a (Option[Int], (Int) => Boolean) => Option[Int]. –  Aaron Novstrup Nov 12 '10 at 20:09
    
I came up with a solution that provides a single lift function with simple syntax, but that also gives the caller control over the form of the lifted function (curried, partly curried, or uncurried). See stackoverflow.com/questions/4160239/lifting-methods-in-scala/… if you're interested. –  Aaron Novstrup Nov 19 '10 at 7:13

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