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I am going through The C++ Programming Language Book and reached "Iterators and I/O" page 61 they give the following example to demonstrate iterating through a string submitted.

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{

    istream_iterator<string>ii(cin);
    istream_iterator<string>eos;

    string s1 = *ii;
    ++ii;
    string s2 = *ii;

    cout <<s1 << ' '<< s2 <<'\n';
}

Which I totally understand, now I was playing around with this example to make it work for numbers as well. I tried adding in the following in the respective places...

istream_iterator<int>jj(cin);
int i1 = *jj;
cout <<s1 << ''<< s2 << ''<< i1 <<'\n';

Which does not give me the chance to input the number section when running the program. Why is this so ? Can the iterator only be used once on cin ? such that it is already has input from cin so the next iterator is ignored ?


Edit here is what I have after insertions

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{

    istream_iterator<string>ii(cin);
    istream_iterator<string>eos;

    //istream_iterator<int>dd(cin);

    string s1 = *ii;
    ++ii;
    string s2 = *ii;
    //int d = *dd;
    int d =24;
    cout <<s1 << ' '<<s2<<' '<<d<< '\n';
}

The above works for

Hello World or
Hello
World

Giving Hello World as the output.

removing the comments from

istream_iterator<int>dd(cin);
int d = *dd;

and commenting out

int d =24;

Leads to Hello Hello 0 as the output.

share|improve this question
    
Your second code snippet is unclear; what's the value of i1 after the second statement? –  Evan Kroske Nov 12 '10 at 0:47
    
@evan fixed now sorry about that. –  phwd Nov 12 '10 at 0:49
    
What does your full code look like? What output are you getting? And what output are you expecting? –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 12 '10 at 0:52
    
@PigBen Updating now with my recent additions and trials –  phwd Nov 12 '10 at 1:01
    
@PigBen @Evan okay I placed everything now, the one I extracted from the book and my changes to it. –  phwd Nov 12 '10 at 1:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When you first create an istream_iterator, it gets the first input and stores the data internally. In order to get more data, you call operator++. So here's what's happening in your code:

int main()
{

    istream_iterator<string>ii(cin);  // gets the first string "Hello"
    istream_iterator<int>jj(cin); // tries to get an int, but fails and puts cin in an error state

    string s1 = *ii; // stores "Hello" in s1
    ++ii;            // Tries to get the next string, but can't because cin is in an error state
    string s2 = *ii; // stores "Hello" in s2
    int i1 = *jj;    // since the previous attempt to get an int failed, this gets the default value, which is 0

    cout <<s1 << ' '<<s2 <<' '<< i1 << '\n';
}

Here's what you want to do:

int main()
{

    istream_iterator<string>ii(cin);

    string s1 = *ii;
    ++ii;
    string s2 = *ii;

    istream_iterator<int>jj(cin);
    int i1 = *jj;

    // after this, you can use the iterators alternatingly,
    //  calling operator++ to get the next input each time

    cout <<s1 << ' '<<s2 <<' '<< i1 << '\n';
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this answer is based on revision 3 of the post. –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 12 '10 at 1:13
    
ah okay I think I get it now, so the cin error will affect getting more data ? Is there a way to see if the error is happening or not ? like a error flag I can listen in for? –  phwd Nov 12 '10 at 1:14
    
@phwd: cin.fail() or !cin –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 12 '10 at 1:16
    
Thanks! –  phwd Nov 12 '10 at 1:21

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