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My gut feeling is it is not. I am in the following situation:

class PluginLoader
{
   public:
      Builder* const p_Builder;
      Logger* const p_Logger;

      //Others
};

PluginLoader::PluginLoader(Builder* const pBuilder)
   :p_Builder(pBuilder), p_Logger(pBuilder->GetLogger())
{
   //Stuff
}

Or should I change the constructor and pass a Logger* const from where PluginLoader is constructed?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

That's perfectly fine and normal. p_Builder was initialized before it.

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Gee. I must be a not gate. :) –  nakiya Nov 12 '10 at 6:00
4  
It's even more so, since he's calling pBuilder->GetLogger(), not p_Builder->GetLogger(). Both are legal, but the second is sensitive to the instance variable being reordered in the class definition. –  Eclipse Nov 12 '10 at 6:02
    
@Eclipse: Oh, I didn't even see that ha. @nakiya: Did you mean to use the member or parameter? Either is safe, as is. –  GManNickG Nov 12 '10 at 6:05
1  
@nakiya: See parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/ctors.html#faq-10.6 –  Eclipse Nov 12 '10 at 6:09
5  
@Martin: Close; they're initialized in the order they appear in the class definition. The initializer list should match that, but strictly speaking it doesn't have to. –  GManNickG Nov 12 '10 at 7:08

What you have is fine. However, I just want to warn you to be careful not to do this: (GMan alluded to this, I just wanted to make it perfectly clear)

class PluginLoader
{
   public:
      Logger* const p_Logger;   // p_Logger is listed first before p_Builder
      Builder* const p_Builder;

      //Others
};

PluginLoader::PluginLoader(Builder* const pBuilder)
   :p_Builder(pBuilder),
    p_Logger(p_Builder->GetLogger())   // Though listed 2nd, it is called first.
                                       // This wouldn't be a problem if pBuilder 
                                       // was used instead of p_Builder
{
   //Stuff
}

Note that I made 2 changes to your code. First, in the class definition, I declared p_Logger before p_Builder. Second, I used the member p_Builder to initialize p_Logger, instead of the parameter.

Either one of these changes would be fine, but together they introduce a bug, because p_Logger is initialized first, and you use the uninitialized p_Builder to initialize it.

Just always remember that the members are initialized in the order they appear in the class definition. And the order you put them in your initialization list is irrelevant.

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Perfectly good practice.

I would suggest this (but its on a purely personal level):

instead of having functions called in your constructor, to group them in a init function, only for flexibility purposes: if you later have to create other constructors.

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2  
If what you are suggesting is a private init function that you call from the constructor, I don't quite care for that but I guess it is ok. If what you are suggesting is a public init function that has to be called by users of the class, that is prone to errors and inconsistencies (after creating an object it would be in a yet invalid state and the user can forget to call the init or try to use the object between construction and initialization...) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 12 '10 at 9:15

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