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I have some classes looking like this:

class Base:
  subs = [Sub3,Sub1]
  # Note that this is NOT a list of all subclasses!
  # Order is also important

class Sub1(Base): pass
class Sub2(Base): pass
class Sub3(Base): pass
...

Now, this fails because Sub1 and Sub3 are not defined when Base.subs is. But obviously I can't put the subclasses before Base either. Is there a way to forward-declare classes in Python? I want to work with isinstance so the types in subs actually have to be the same as the later declared subclasses, it's not enough that they have the same name and other properties.

One workaround is to do: Base.subs = [Sub3,Sub1] after the subclasses have been defined, but I don't like having to split my class in that way.

edit: Added information about order

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2  
This is a bad design. You're conflating a factory (which is aware of subclasses) with the superclass (which does not need to be aware of subclasses). Why do this? Why not simply separate things and make things simpler? –  S.Lott Nov 12 '10 at 11:03
    
@S.Lott: What if it does not actually need to be aware of it's subclasses per se. It just needs to have a bunch of classes in a list, some of which might be its subclasses. –  pafcu Nov 12 '10 at 11:44
1  
@pafcu: "some of which might be its subclasses". This is still a bad idea -- a superclass should never know about it's subclasses. Doing so violates a principle of OO design. You can no longer simply create new subclasses without also changing the superclass. You have to separate the "list of classes" from the superclass. The only reason for having a "list of classes" is to create a factory. A factory is a good thing; it's not a feature of a superclass, however. –  S.Lott Nov 12 '10 at 13:13
    
What's the purpose of the subs list, or more specifically, what determines whether and in what order the subclasses get put in it? @S.Lott's critique may be valid depending on exactly what you're trying to achieve, but more information is required to actually make such a judgment. Depending on what that is, it might be possible to make the base class and subclasses cooperate without having to modify the base class every time you add a subclass -- a weakness of the approach you're now using. –  martineau Nov 12 '10 at 17:50
2  
@pafcu: If you start down the wrong road and write code with a poor design, we can't really help you except to say, stop doing that, and start down a road that doesn't have the obvious problems. It's not a "straightforward question". If it was, you would have found the answer on your own. The question reflects a common design mistake. Fix the mistake and you no longer need to ask this question. –  S.Lott Nov 12 '10 at 21:17

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is a hybrid version of @Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams and @aaronasterling's answers which preserves the order of the subclasses in the list. Initially the subclass names are manually placed in the subs list in the desired order. Then as each subclass is defined, a class decorator causes the corresponding string to be replaced with the actual subtype.

class Base:
  @classmethod
  def registersub(cls, subcls):
    """ Decorator to register subclass types. """
    # replace occurrence(s) of subclass name in 'subs' with the subclass itself
    while subcls.__name__ in cls.subs:
        cls.subs[cls.subs.index(subcls.__name__)] = subcls
    return cls

  subs = ['Sub3','Sub1']  # some subclass names in some special order

@Base.registersub
class Sub1(Base): pass
@Base.registersub
class Sub2(Base): pass
@Base.registersub
class Sub3(Base): pass

print Base.subs
# [<class __main__.Sub3>, <class __main__.Sub1>]

It important to note that there's a perhaps subtle difference between my original answer above and the update which follows below -- namely which is that the while the former will work with any class name that is registered with @Base.registersub, whether or not its a subclass of Base.

I'm pointing this out for two reasons. First because in your comments you said that subs was a "bunch of classes in a list, some of which might be its subclasses", and more importantly because that is not the case with the code in my update, which only works for Base subclasses since they are effectively "registered" automatically via the metaclass -- but leave anything other in the list alone.

Update
Exactly the same thing can also be done using a metaclass -- which has the advantage that it eliminates the need to explicitly decorate each subclass as shown in the accepted answer above and instead makes it happen automagically. Note that even though the metaclass's __init__() is called for the creation of every subclass, it only updates the subs list if that subclass's name appears in it -- so the initial Base class definition of the contents of subs still controls what gets put in it and in what order.

class BaseMeta(type):
    def __init__(cls, name, bases, classdict):
        if classdict.get('__metaclass__') is not BaseMeta:  # subclass?
            # replace any occurrences of this subclass name
            # in Base class 'subs' list with the subclass itself
            while name in cls.subs:
                cls.subs[cls.subs.index(name)] = cls
        type.__init__(cls, name, bases, classdict)

class Base:
    __metaclass__ = BaseMeta
    subs = ['Sub3','Sub1']  # some subclass names in some special order

class Sub1(Base): pass
class Sub2(Base): pass
class Sub3(Base): pass

print Base.subs
# [<class '__main__.Sub3'>, <class '__main__.Sub1'>]
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Write a decorator that adds it to the registry in Base.

class Base(object):
  subs = []

  @classmethod
  def addsub(cls, scls):
    cls.subs.append(scls)

 ...

@Base.addsub
class Sub1(Base):
  pass

class Sub2(Base):
  pass

@Base.addsub
class Sub3(Base):
  pass
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, forgot to specify that order is important (it's a list of "preferred" types). Having this depend on the order of the code is pretty dangerous. I guess I could add a parameter to addsub for that though. This still has the problem though that the contents of Base.subs is defined all over the place. –  pafcu Nov 12 '10 at 7:39

Edit: Because of the added requirement of order I completely reworked my answer. I also make use of a class decorator, which was used here first by @Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams.

Edit2: code now tested and some stupidity slightly corrected


class Base(object):
    subs = []

    @classmethod
    def addsub(cls, before=None): 
        def inner(subclass):
            if before and before in cls.subs:
                cls.subs.insert(cls.subs.index(before), subclass)
            else:
                cls.subs.append(subclass)
            return subclass
        return inner

@Base.addsub()
class Sub1(Base):
    pass

class Sub2(Base):
    pass

@Base.addsub(before=Sub1)
class Sub3(Base):
    pass

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In that case it's hard to determine the order of the list Base.subs. It would depend on the order in which I write the code which is pretty error-prone. Also, Base.subs is a property of the Base class so I would prefer to define it there instead of spreading it out over several classes. –  pafcu Nov 12 '10 at 7:36
    
Yes, and the code breaks in interesting ways if someone does not realize that class order matters (it usually doesn't). It's easy to accidentally change order when e.g. refactoring or cleaning up the code. –  pafcu Nov 12 '10 at 7:46
    
I haven't seen a problem where it should matter. Perhaps you should think about a) being way more explicit in generating and maintaining order or b) not depending on order at all. Why should it matter? –  knitti Nov 12 '10 at 7:59
    
Also, Sub.__new__ affects, instance creation, not class creation which is what's needed here. –  aaronasterling Nov 12 '10 at 8:06
    
well, I had to redo it anyways... –  knitti Nov 12 '10 at 8:10

I would just define the subclasses as strings and have the inevitable decorator replace the strings with the classes that they name. I would also define the decorator on a metaclass because I think that that's more in line with the objective: we're modifying class behavior and just like you modify object behavior by modifying its class, you modify class behavior by modifying its metaclass.

class BaseMeta(type):

    def register(cls, subcls):
        try:
            i = cls.subs.index(subcls.__name__)
        except ValueError:
            pass
        else:
            cls.subs[i] = subcls
        finally:
            return cls


class Base(object):
    __metaclass__ = BaseMeta
    subs = ['Sub3', 'Sub1']

@Base.register
class Sub1(Base): pass

@Base.register
class Sub2(Base): pass

@Base.register
class Sub3(Base): pass

print Base.subs

This outputs:

[<class '__main__.Sub3'>, <class '__main__.Sub1'>]
share|improve this answer
    
This seems like a really interesting approach because I can specify the elements of base.subs all in one place. Makes it much easier to change if needed. –  pafcu Nov 12 '10 at 9:13
    
What is the point of using a metaclass here? –  martineau Nov 13 '10 at 0:01
    
@martineau, The point is that we are changing the class's behavior. Doing this by changing the class itself is essentially monkey patching an object. The reason to change a class is to change the behavior of its instances - not to change its own behavior. You do that by changing the class of which it is an instance, namely its metaclass. We're not programming in C++ anymore, classes are objects too :) Also, I deleted my snarky comment on your answer. I haven't actually been seeing comments directed to me for some reason. –  aaronasterling Nov 13 '10 at 8:39
    
@aaronasterling: Thanks for the explanation. While I understand and would normally completely agree with your rationale, I don't think it really applies here because sticking the subclass decorator into the metaclass won't have any effect unless it's explicitly applied to a subclass using the @ syntax. In other word, in this case, putting it in a metaclass just seems like a needless and potential confusing complication -- and why I consciously chose to just make it a classmethod of the Base class in my own answer. –  martineau Nov 15 '10 at 16:03
    
@martineau, well I guess I've never been one for writing code that lazy people can understand - If they can great, if not oh well. So aside from the issue of confusion, my point stands. class methods are just monkey patching with pretty syntax. changing the metaclass is the right way. –  aaronasterling Nov 15 '10 at 19:31

I'm pretty sure this should work for you. Just assign the depended class attribute afterwards. This is also a lot less complicated.

class Base:pass

class Sub1(Base): pass
class Sub2(Base): pass
class Sub3(Base): pass

Base.subs = [Sub3,Sub1]
print(Sub1.subs)
#[<class __main__.Sub3 at 0x0282B2D0>, <class __main__.Sub1 at 0x01C79810>]
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The OP specifically mentioned why he/she was looking for another way to do it. –  martineau Jan 4 '13 at 21:03
class Foo:
  pass

class Bar:
  pass

Foo.m = Bar()
Bar.m = Foo()
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This was ruled out in the question. The definition of Foo is split. –  Oddthinking Nov 12 '10 at 7:35
    
No, not this... –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 12 '10 at 7:36

There is no way to directly declare forward-references in Python, but there are several workarounds, a few of which are reasonable:

1) Add the subclasses manually after they are defined.

    - Pros: easy to do; Base.subs is updated in one place
    - Cons: easy to forget (plus you don't want to do it this way)

Example:

class Base(object):
    pass

class Sub1(Base):
    pass

class Sub2(Base):
    pass

class Sub3(Base):
    pass

Base.subs = [sub3, sub1]

2) Create Base.subs with str values, and use a class decorator to substitute the actual subclasses (this can be a class method on Base or a function -- I'm showing the function version, although I would probably use the method version).

- Pros: easy to do
- Cons: somewhat easy to forget; 

Example:

def register_with_Base(cls):
    name = cls.__name__
    index = Base.subs.index(name)
    Base.subs[index] = cls
    return cls

class Base(object):
    subs = ['Sub3', 'Sub1']

@register_with_Base
class Sub1(Base):
    pass

class Sub2(Base):
    pass

@register_with_Base
class Sub3(Base):
    pass

3) Create Base.subs with str values, and have the method that uses Base.subs do the substitution.

- Pros: no extra work in decorators, no forgetting to update `subs` later
- Cons: small amount of extra work when accessing `subs`

Example:

class Base(object):
    subs = ['Sub3', 'Sub1']
    def select_sub(self, criteria):
        for sub in self.subs:
            sub = globals()[sub]
            if #sub matches criteria#:
                break
        else:
            # use a default, raise an exception, whatever
        # use sub, which is the class defined below

class Sub1(Base):
    pass

class Sub2(Base):
    pass

class Sub3(Base):
    pass

I would use option 3 myself, as it keeps the functionality and the data all in one place. The only thing you have to do is keep subs up to date (and write the appropriate subclasses, of course).

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