Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

If I define a class with a private default constructor and a public constructor that has parameters, how can I access the private constructor?

public class Bob
{
   public String Surname { get; set; }

   private Bob()
   { }

   public Bob(string surname)
   {
      Surname = surname;
   }
}

I can access the private constructor via a static method on the class like this:

public static Bob GetBob()
{
   return new Bob();
}

I thought that I could access the private constructor via an extension method, since (according to my understanding) extension methods are translated so that they appear to be static methods on the class, but I can't:

static class Fred
{
   public static Bob Bobby(this Bob bob)
   {
      return new Bob();
   }
}

So, how can I access the private constructor?

Thank you


EDIT:

The reason that I wanted to do this was that I wanted to create tests for one of our business classes, but not allow a consumer of this class to be able to instantiate an object incorrectly. I'm testing it, so I know (I hope!) under what circumstances the tests will fail. I'm still a testing n00b right now so my idea may or may not have been the "wrong way" of doing things.

I've changed my testing strategy to just do things the way the a consumer of this class would, i.e. calling the public methods and if the public methods are OK, assuming that the private methods are OK. I would still prefer to test the private methods, but my boss is breathing down my neck on a deliverable :-(

share|improve this question
    
Humor me, Why would you want to invoke your private contructor outside your class implementation ? – Sk8tz Nov 12 '10 at 8:34
6  
Why the close vote? It's still a valid question, even if it's not recommended to get the constructor. – jgauffin Nov 12 '10 at 8:35
    
Agreed -- still a valid question, why close? – Dr Herbie Nov 12 '10 at 8:38
    
Re: Testing private methods. I have found that by testing private methods individually, my tests are smaller and more precise than if I test only public methods. I tend to make 'private' into 'protected' and write a specific wrapper class in the test library to expose them as public versions rather than use reflection. – Dr Herbie Nov 12 '10 at 9:06
1  
Yes -- lots of legacy code written by previous devs. Plus I have to say that the business logic involved (part-exchange sales) is ridiculously complicated (more complex than my PhD for a start) -- but that's how our customers work. – Dr Herbie Nov 12 '10 at 13:39
up vote 30 down vote accepted

Default constructors are private for a reason. The developer doesn't make it private for fun.

But if you still want to use the default constructor you get it by using reflection.

var constructor = typeof(Bob).GetConstructor(BindingFlags.NonPublic|BindingFlags.Instance, null, new Type[0], null);
var instance = (Bob)constructor.Invoke(null);

Edit

I saw your comment about testing. Never test protected or private methods / properties. You have probably done something wrong if you can't manage to test those methods/properties through the public API. Either remove them or refactor the class.

Edit 2

Forgot a binding flag.

share|improve this answer
1  
Isn't this a sort of a hack? To bypass the reason for making the constructor private? – Liviu M. Nov 12 '10 at 8:31
3  
Yes it is. That's why I wrote Default constructors are private for a reason. The developer doesn't make it private for fun. – jgauffin Nov 12 '10 at 8:33
    
Thanks. However, the GetConstructor method returns null, so that code throws a NullReferenceException. typeof(Bob).GetConstructors(BindingFlags.NonPublic); returns an empty array. – AndrewJacksonZA Nov 12 '10 at 9:14
    
Try again with the updated code. I just tested it myself and it works. – jgauffin Nov 12 '10 at 9:24
1  
@Liviu M. - Yup, this is clearly a hack, but that is exactly what the OP asks for in his question, so that makes this the correct answer ;) – Øyvind Bråthen Nov 12 '10 at 9:32

There are several ways around this issue:

One: Make the constructor public. If you need to access it from outside the class why is it private (it might be that you only want to access the private constructor for testing, in which case this is a valid issue).

Two: Make the constructor protected, then access it through a derived class:

public class Bob
{
    public String Surname { get; set; }

    protected Bob()
    { }

    public Bob(string surname)
    {
        Surname = surname;
    }
}

public class Fred : Bob
{
    public Fred()
        : base()
    {
    }
}

Three: Use reflection (as shown by jgauffin).

share|improve this answer
    
As you can see in the edit on the question, it is for testing, thanks. And the formatting is still out. – AndrewJacksonZA Nov 12 '10 at 8:56
1  
the code formatting bugs when using lists in the same answer. – jgauffin Nov 12 '10 at 9:25
    
Cheers -- I'll try and remember that for the future. – Dr Herbie Nov 12 '10 at 9:29

In additional to @jgauffin's answer which tells how to call private constructors via reflection:

Is it possible to change the modifiers of the private constructor?

It seems that you are implementing Factory Pattern in your code. Thus the modifier is supposed to be internal.

public class Product
{
   //others can't create instances outside the namespace
   internal Product() { }    
}
public class ProductProvider
{
   //they can only get standardized products by the provider
   //while you have full control to Product class inside ProductProvider
   public static CreateProduct()
   {
       //can create an instance here because they are in the same namespace
       Product p = new Product();    
       //standardize the product
       return p;
   }  
}

Extension methods

public static MyExt
{
   public static void DoSomething(this Product p) { }
}

Calling p.DoSomething() actually equals to MyExt.DoSomething(p). It's not putting this method into class Product.

share|improve this answer

You can instantiate instances of that type via reflection.

share|improve this answer

The method Bobby is still in a different class, called Fred. That is why you can't access the prive constructor of the Bob class. What you are trying to do is not possible with attached methods. Even if they can be attached on another class they are still declared outside that class and follow the usual scope/access rules.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input. I included Bobby to show what I have done so that nobody wastes their time suggesting extension methods. – AndrewJacksonZA Nov 12 '10 at 9:09
public class demo
{
   private demo()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("This is no parameter private constructor");
    }
    public demo(int a)
    {
        demo d = new demo('c');// u can call both private contstructors from here
        demo dd = new demo();
        Console.WriteLine("This is one parameter public constructor");
    }
    private demo(char a)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("This is one parameter public constructor::" + a);
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        demo obj = new demo(7);
        // demo obj = new demo();  // it will raise error
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please comment your solution – Martin Prikryl Apr 4 '14 at 7:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.