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I currently have a controller that will handle a call to export a table into a CSV file using the FasterCSV gem. The problem is the information stored in the database isn't clear sometimes and so I want to change the output for a particular column.

My project.status column for instance has numbers instead of statuses ie 1 in the database corresponds to Active, 2 for Inactive and 0 for Not Yet decided. When I export the table it shows 0,1,2 instead of Active, Inactive or Not Yet decided. Any idea how to implement this?

I tried a simple loop that would check the final generated CSV file and change each 0,1,2 to its corresponding output, but the problem is every other column that had a 0,1,2 would change as well. I'm not sure how to isolate the column. Thanks in advance

 def csv
    qt = params[:selection]
    @lists = Project.find(:all, :order=> (params[:sort] + ' ' + params[:direction]), :conditions =>  ["name LIKE ? OR description LIKE ?", "%#{qt}%", "%#{qt}%"])

    csv_string = FasterCSV.generate(:encoding => 'u') do |csv|
      csv << ["Status","Name","Summary","Description","Creator","Comment","Contact Information","Created Date","Updated Date"]
      @lists.each do |project|
              csv << [project.status, project.name, project.summary, project.description, project.creator, project.statusreason, project.contactinfo, project.created_at, project.updated_at]
      end
    end

    filename = Time.now.strftime("%Y%m%d") + ".csv"
    send_data(csv_string,
      :type => 'text/csv; charset=UTF-8; header=present',
      :filename => filename)
  end
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is actually fairly easy. In your controller code:

  #app/controllers/projects_controller.rb#csv
  @lists.each do |project|
          csv << [project.descriptive_status, project.name, project.summary, project.description, project.creator, project.statusreason, project.contactinfo, project.created_at, project.updated_at]
  end

Then in your model code. You probably already have a method that decodes the DB status to a more descriptive one though:

#app/models/project.rb

ACTIVE_STATUS = 0
INACTIVE_STATUS = 1
NOT_YET_DECIDED_STATUS = 2

def descriptive_status
  case status
    when ACTIVE_STATUS
      "Active"
    when INACTIVE_STATUS
      "Inactive"
    when NOT_YET_DECIDED_STATUS
      "Not Yet Decided"
  end
end

There are probably a number of ways you can then refactor this. In the controller at least, it would probably be best to make that finder a more descriptive named scope. The constants in the model could be brought into SettingsLogic configuration or another similar gem.

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I have mine written like this STATUS = { :APPLYING => 0, :REJECTED => 1, :READY => 2, :SUSPENDED => 3, :PENDING => 4 }.freeze, where everything is in one variable. I'm still confused as to why I would need to modify my model. Shouldn't the view or the controller handle this? –  JayG Nov 15 '10 at 2:02
    
Not at all, the model is in charge of all the business logic, which in this case would be the translation of database stored fields to human readable fields. The model can be utilized by numerous views and controllers, and duplicating the code to provide a readable status would be a fairly significant anti-pattern. –  Patrick Robertson Nov 15 '10 at 14:40
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