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To a perl script that I am writing, there can be a lot (~50) of command line options provided. Most of them are optional, so a call will have only some of the options provided.

I am using GetOpt::Long but it does not allow me to use GetOptions more than once. As a result, I have to use all the command line options in one GetOptions call.

Is there some good way to group the options while using GetOptions?

$ cat test.pl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Getopt::Long;

my ($a, $b, $c, $d);

GetOptions ('a=s' => \$a, 'b=s' => \$b);
GetOptions ('c=s' => \$c, 'd=s' => \$d);

print "a = $a\nb = $b\nc = $c\nd = $d\n";

$ perl test.pl -a=AA -b=BB -c=CC -d=DD
Unknown option: c
Unknown option: d
Use of uninitialized value in concatenation (.) or string at test.pl line 10.
Use of uninitialized value in concatenation (.) or string at test.pl line 10.
a = AA
b = BB
c = 
d = 
$
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4 Answers

It may be a good idea to store your options in a hash instead:

See Getopt::Long : Storing options values in a hash :


Sometimes, for example when there are a lot of options, having a separate variable for each of them can be cumbersome. GetOptions() supports, as an alternative mechanism, storing options values in a hash.

To obtain this, a reference to a hash must be passed as the first argument to GetOptions(). For each option that is specified on the command line, the option value will be stored in the hash with the option name as key. Options that are not actually used on the command line will not be put in the hash, on other words, exists($h{option}) (or defined()) can be used to test if an option was used. The drawback is that warnings will be issued if the program runs under use strict and uses $h{option} without testing with exists() or defined() first.

my %h = ();
GetOptions (\%h, 'length=i');       # will store in $h{length}

For options that take list or hash values, it is necessary to indicate this by appending an @ or % sign after the type:

GetOptions (\%h, 'colours=s@');     # will push to @{$h{colours}}

To make things more complicated, the hash may contain references to the actual destinations, for example:

my $len = 0;
my %h = ('length' => \$len);
GetOptions (\%h, 'length=i');       # will store in $len

This example is fully equivalent with:

my $len = 0;
GetOptions ('length=i' => \$len);   # will store in $len

Any mixture is possible. For example, the most frequently used options could be stored in variables while all other options get stored in the hash:

my $verbose = 0;                    # frequently referred
my $debug = 0;                      # frequently referred
my %h = ('verbose' => \$verbose, 'debug' => \$debug);
GetOptions (\%h, 'verbose', 'debug', 'filter', 'size=i');
if ( $verbose ) { ... }
if ( exists $h{filter} ) { ... option 'filter' was specified ... }
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+1 - Among other reasons, once you start doing any complicated development, having options in individual variables instead of a hash you can pass as a whole to object constructors is Very Painful. –  DVK Nov 12 '10 at 17:03
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What's wrong with:

GetOptions(
  'a=s' => \$a,
  'b=s' => \$b,
  'c=s' => \$c,
  'd=s' => \$d,
);

Or, if they're all short, you could do:

GetOptions(
  'a=s' => \$a,   'b=s' => \$b,
  'c=s' => \$c,   'd=s' => \$d,
);

(Note that it's a bad idea to use $a and $b for anything except sort comparisions.)

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As I mentioned in the question, I have about 50 of them, and if they are not grouped, it is difficult to keep track of them. –  Lazer Nov 12 '10 at 10:19
1  
@Lazer, then you're going to have to better explain what you mean by "grouped". GetOptions doesn't care what order they're listed in; list them in whatever order makes sense to you. –  cjm Nov 12 '10 at 10:27
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The most direct answer is to use Getopt::Long::Configure like so:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Getopt::Long;

my ($a, $b, $c, $d);

Getopt::Long::Configure( qw(pass_through) );
GetOptions ('a=s' => \$a, 'b=s' => \$b);

Getopt::Long::Configure( qw(no_pass_through) );
GetOptions ('c=s' => \$c, 'd=s' => \$d);

print "a = $a\nb = $b\nc = $c\nd = $d\n";

Note that you should make sure that your last invocation of GetOptions should be configured with no_pass_through to make sure that you get warnings about unknown options.

% perl test_getop.pl -a AA -b BB -c CC -d DD -e EE
Unknown option: e
a = AA
b = BB
c = CC
d = DD
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Normally arrays are flattened out into a single list before being passed to a function, although some functions override this behavior. Using this you can define arrays of option groups and pass the list of arrays to GetOptions.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Getopt::Long;

my ( $opt_a, $opt_b, $opt_c, $opt_d );

my @opt_group_1 = ( 'a=s' => \$opt_a, 'b=s' => \$opt_b );
my @opt_group_2 = ( 'c=s' => \$opt_c, 'd=s' => \$opt_d );
GetOptions( @opt_group_1, @opt_group_2 );

print "a = $opt_a\nb = $opt_b\nc = $opt_c\nd = $opt_d\n";

You can combine this with storing values in a hash to prevent having to create a huge number of option variables as Zaid mentioned.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Getopt::Long;

my @opt_group_1 = ( 'a=s', 'b=s' );
my @opt_group_2 = ( 'c=s', 'd=s' );

my %opt;

GetOptions( \%opt, @opt_group_1, @opt_group_2 );

print "a = $opt{a}\nb = $opt{b}\nc = $opt{c}\nd = $opt{d}\n";
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