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I want to have some of my partials as markdown snippets. What is the easiest way to render them using the standard rails erb templating?

Ideally, I'd like to do something like this:

If I have a partial in app/views/_my_partial.md.erb:

My awesome view
===============

Look, I can **use** <%= language %>!

which I reference from a view like so:

<%= render "my_partial", :language => "Markdown!" %>

I want to get output that looks like this:

<h1>My awesome view</h1>
<p>Look, I can <strong>use</strong> Markdown!</p>
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6 Answers 6

up vote 39 down vote accepted

Turns out, the Right Way (tm) to do this is using ActionView::Template.register_template_handler:

lib/markdown_handler.rb:

require 'rdiscount'

module MarkdownHandler
  def self.erb
    @erb ||= ActionView::Template.registered_template_handler(:erb)
  end

  def self.call(template)
    compiled_source = erb.call(template)
    "RDiscount.new(begin;#{compiled_source};end).to_html"
  end
end

ActionView::Template.register_template_handler :md, MarkdownHandler

If you require 'markdown_handler' in your config/application.rb (or an initializer), then any view or partial can be rendered as Markdown with ERb interpolation using the extension .html.md:

app/views/home/index.html.md:

My awesome view
===============

Look, I can **use** <%= @language %>!

app/controllers/home_controller.rb:

class HomeController < ApplicationController
  def index
    @language = "Markdown"
  end
end
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4  
Nice. Let me add, dont forget to add gem 'rdiscount' to your gemfile and that you can put the handler in the init directory instead and it will just be loaded always. config/initializers/markdown_handler.rb This means you can skip the change to config/applicaiton.rb –  genkilabs Jul 11 '12 at 17:34
    
The nice thing about this solution is that it works with partials (even if layout is haml) by doing = raw(render ('editable/intro')) refering to /views/editable/_intro.html.md. Only the raw feels hackish, and maybe it raises security issues, but besides it's all good! –  Augustin Riedinger Sep 2 '13 at 16:52
    
Interesting, I suspect this could be alleviated with the addition of a .html_safe to the generated source. The code returned from erb.call(template) is already escaped by the ERb rendered, and we're not doing any interpolation here, so it should be fine. –  Jacob Oct 5 '13 at 13:38

Not a pure markdown solution but you can use HAML filters to render markdown, as well as other markup languages.

For example, in app/views/_my_partial.html.haml:

:markdown
  My awesome view
  ===============

  Look, I can **use** #{language}!
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4  
What I dislike about this approach is it forces an indentation of what should arguably be a pure markdown file. If I want a copy person to be able to control some content I want them to own the entire file and not have to remember to keep everything indented one level. –  Chris Nicola Feb 12 '12 at 19:59
    
But then the good thing is that it doesn't load the same functionnalities two times, right? Is gem 'rdiscount' still necessary there? Maybe this answer is a good compromise? stackoverflow.com/a/8026947/1620081 –  Augustin Riedinger Aug 26 '13 at 12:25

I just released a markdown-rails gem, which handles .html.md views.

You cannot chain it with Erb though -- it's only for static views and partials. To embed Ruby code, you'd have to use tjwallace's solution with :markdown.

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Piling on the solutions already presented, this is an interpolation-ary way in Rails 3 to render a pure Markdown file in a view from a partial without unnecessary indentation using Haml's :markdown filter and the RDiscount gem. The only catch is that your Markdown file is a Haml file, but that shouldn't matter for someone like a copy person.

In Gemfile:

gem 'rdiscount'

In app/views/my_page.html.haml

:markdown
  #{render 'my_partial', language: 'Markdown!'}

In app/views/_my_partial.html.haml

My awesome view
===============

Look, I can **use** #{language}!

If you didn't need the :language variable passed in to the markdown file, you could do away altogether with your Markdown being a Haml file:

In app/views/my_page.html.haml

:markdown
  #{render 'my_partial.md'}

In app/views/_my_partial.md

My awesome view
===============

Sorry, cannot **use** #{language} here!

Don't like those pesky underscores on your Markdown files?

In app/views/my_page.html.haml

:markdown
  #{render file: 'my_markdown.md'}

In app/views/my_markdown.md

My awesome view
===============

Sorry, cannot **use** #{language} here!
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1  
Haha, nasty. I like this one. –  danneu Aug 11 '12 at 0:07

Have found way not to use haml in such situation.

in views/layouts/_markdown.html.erb

<%= m yield %>

in app/helpers/application_helper.rb

def m(string)
   RDiscount.new(string).to_html.html_safe
end  

in Gemfile

gem 'rdiscount'

So, in view you can call it like:

<%= render :partial => "contract.markdown", :layout => 'layouts/markdown.html.erb' %>

And contract.markdown will be formatted as markdown

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Leveraged your answer to make a gem to render for GitHub Flavored Markdown in Rails (via HTML::Pipeline): https://github.com/afeld/html_pipeline_rails

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Thanks, this gem was the perfect solution for me (actually Rails 4). –  Andy Waite Aug 3 at 12:43
    
This gem was perfect for Rails 4. Allowed me to put all Markdown content into a single folder and include it where needed via partials. No need to have the entire view Markdown, just the content parts. –  Marc Qualie yesterday

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