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this is the question

Shuffle. Now that you’ve finished your new sorting algorithm, how about the opposite? Write a shuffle method that takes an array and returns a totally shuffled version. As always, you’ll want to test it, but testing this one is trickier: How can you test to make sure you are getting a perfect shuffle? What would you even say a perfect shuffle would be? Now test for it.

This is my code answer:

def shuffle arr
    x = arr.length
while x != 0
        new_arr = []
    rand_arr = (rand(x))
    x--
    new_arr.push rand_arr
    arr.pop rand_arr
end

new_arr

end

puts (shuffle ([1,2,3]))

What are my mistakes? Why doesn't this code work?

share|improve this question
    
Why have you put rand(x) in parentheses? –  Skilldrick Nov 12 '10 at 10:16
1  
What do you mean doesn't work? Bad answer, no answer, error messages? –  Kate Gregory Nov 12 '10 at 10:17
1  
homework? interview screening? –  zengr Nov 12 '10 at 10:18
    
this is the eror i get: –  gal Nov 12 '10 at 10:20
1  
The least you could do is posting valid code that runs... –  David Nov 12 '10 at 10:23

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Beside minor other errors you seems not to understand what pop and push are doing (taking or adding some items from the end of the array).

You are probably trying to write something like below.

def shuffle arr
    x = arr.length
    new_arr = []
    while x != 0
        randpos = rand(x)
        x = x-1
        item = arr[randpos]
        new_arr.push item
        arr[randpos] = arr[x]
        arr.pop
    end

    new_arr

end

puts (shuffle ([1,2,3]))
share|improve this answer
    
10x man! you helped me alot! –  gal Nov 12 '10 at 10:34

Here's a far more Rubyish version:

class Array
  def shuffle!
    size.downto(1) { |n| push delete_at(rand(n)) }
    self
  end
end

puts [1,2,3].shuffle!
share|improve this answer

You're getting your indexes mixed up with your values. When you do new_arr.push rand_arr, you're putting whatever random index you came up with as a value on the end of new_arr. What you meant to do is new_arr.push arr[rand_arr], where arr[rand_arr] is the value at the index rand_arr in arr.

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10x but this is steal not working. –  gal Nov 12 '10 at 10:28
    
the eror is: rand.rb:7: syntax error, unexpected tIDENTIFIER, expecting keyword_end new_arr.push arr[rand_arr] the code is:def shuffle arr x = arr.length while x != 0 new_arr = [] rand_arr = (rand(x)) x-- new_arr.push arr[rand_arr] arr.pop arr[rand_arr] end new_arr end puts (shuffle ([1,2,3])) –  gal Nov 12 '10 at 10:28
    
this one is the compilation error, just replace x-- by x = x - 1 will fix it. But that is not enough to make code works, there is also logical errors. –  kriss Nov 12 '10 at 10:32
    
@gal I suggest you learn Ruby before trying to go any further with this. –  Skilldrick Nov 12 '10 at 10:32
    
ruby-doc.org/docs/Newcomers/ruby.html, look at the part on decrement and increment –  kriss Nov 12 '10 at 10:33

Here's a more concise way of writing it:

def shuffle(arr)
  new_arr = []

  while (arr.any?) do 
    new_arr << arr.delete_at(rand(arr.length))
  end

  new_arr
end

And some tests:

5.times do
  puts shuffle((1..5).to_a).join(',')
end

>> 4,2,1,3,5
>> 3,2,1,4,5
>> 4,2,5,1,3
>> 5,2,1,4,3
>> 4,3,1,5,2
share|improve this answer

Ruby 1.8.7 and 1.9.2 have a built-in Array#shuffle method.

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yes, but the OP needed to write it as some sort of an assignment. –  the Tin Man Nov 12 '10 at 20:29

A variant of Mark Thomas's answer. His algorithm can be quite slow with a large array, due to delete operation performance.

class Array
  def shuffle!
    size.downto(1) do |n|
       index=rand(n)
       # swap elements at index and the end
       self[index], self[size-1] = self[size-1],self[index]
    end
    self
  end
end

puts [1,2,3].shuffle!

This algorithm is O(size), while Mark's algorithm is O(size^2). On my computer, Mark's answer takes 400 seconds to shuffle an array of 1,000,000 elements on my machine, versus 0.5 seconds with my method.

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