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Setup as so:

public interface IFoo
{
    void Fizz();
}

[Test]
public void A()
{
    var foo = new Mock<IFoo>(MockBehavior.Loose);

    foo.Object.Fizz();

    foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz());

    // stuff here

    foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz(), Times.Never()); // currently this fails
}

Basically I'd like to enter some code at the // stuff here to make the foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz(), Times.Never()) pass.

And because this probably constitutes moq/unit testing abuse, my justification is so I can do something like this:

[Test]
public void Justification()
{
    var foo = new Mock<IFoo>(MockBehavior.Loose);
    foo.Setup(x => x.Fizz());

    var objectUnderTest = new ObjectUnderTest(foo.Object);

    objectUnderTest.DoStuffToPushIntoState1(); // this is various lines of code and setup

    foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz());

    // reset the verification here

    objectUnderTest.DoStuffToPushIntoState2(); // more lines of code

    foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz(), Times.Never());
}

Basically, I have a state object where a fair bit of work (both in terms of making various mock objects and other faffing around) is requires to push it into State1. Then I want to test the transition from State1 to State2. Instead of duplicating or abstracting the code I'd prefer to just re-use the State1 test, push it into State2 and perform my Asserts - all of which I can do except the verification calls.

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Have added solution bellow using Mock.Sequence –  Artiom Oct 7 '13 at 7:21

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't think you can reset a mock like this. Instead, if you know that Fizz should be called once when transitioning to state 1, you can do your verifies like this:

objectUnderTest.DoStuffToPushIntoState1();
foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz(), Times.Once());  // or however many times you expect it to be called

objectUnderTest.DoStuffToPushIntoState2();
foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz(), Times.Once());

Having said that, I would still create two separate tests for this. As two tests, it's easier to see whether the transition into state 1 is failing, or the transition into state 2 is failing. Additionally, when tested together like this, if your transition into state 1 fails, the test method exits and your transition into state 2 doesn't get tested.

Edit

As an example of this, I tested the following code with xUnit:

[Fact]
public void Test()
{
    var foo = new Mock<IFoo>(MockBehavior.Loose);

    foo.Object.Fizz();
    foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz(), Times.Once(), "Failed After State 1");

    // stuff here
    foo.Object.Fizz();
    foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz(), Times.Once(), "Failed after State 2"); 
}

This test fails with the message, "Failed after State 2". This simulates what would happen if your method that pushes foo into State 2 calls Fizz. If it does, the second Verify will fail.

Looking at your code again, since you are calling one method to verify it does/does not call another method on the mock, I think you need to set CallBase to true so that the base DoStuffToPushIntoState2 is called rather than the mock's override.

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Have you tried this? Becauese for me the second foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz(), Times.Once()); always returns true - even if you don't call objectUnderTest.DoStuffToPushIntoState2(); –  fostandy Nov 13 '10 at 0:09
    
@fostandy, if you call DoStuffToPushIntoState1(), and that calls Fizz once, then Times.Once() will pass. If you comment out DoStuffToPushIntoState2() and nothing else calls Fizz, Times.Once() will continue to pass. I will edit my answer to add code that I have tested. –  adrift Nov 13 '10 at 5:09
    
Thanks adrift - I misunderstood you and you are quite correct. –  fostandy Nov 15 '10 at 8:12
    
@adrift I was having this same issue and stumbled upon a magical MOQ extension function called Moq.MockExtensions.ResetCalls(). It was probably created long after this post. –  stackunderflow May 14 at 16:02

I think long after this post was created they added the functionality that the OP had asked for, there is a Moq extension method called Moq.MockExtensions.ResetCalls().

With this method you can do exactly what you wished as shown below:

[Test]
public void Justification()
{
    var foo = new Mock<IFoo>(MockBehavior.Loose);
    foo.Setup(x => x.Fizz());

    var objectUnderTest = new ObjectUnderTest(foo.Object);

    objectUnderTest.DoStuffToPushIntoState1(); // this is various lines of code and setup

    foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz());

    foo.ResetCalls(); // Reset the verification here with this glorious method

    objectUnderTest.DoStuffToPushIntoState2(); // more lines of code

    foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz(), Times.Never());
}
share|improve this answer

Next approach works fine for me (using Moq.Sequence)

    public void Justification()
    {
        var foo = new Mock<IFoo>(MockBehavior.Loose);
        foo.Setup(x => x.Fizz());

        var objectUnderTest = new ObjectUnderTest(foo.Object);

        objectUnderTest.DoStuffToPushIntoState1(); // this is various lines of code and setup

        foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz());

        // Some cool stuff

        using (Sequence.Create())
        {
            foo.Setup(x => x.Fizz()).InSequence(Times.Never())
            objectUnderTest.DoStuffToPushIntoState2(); // more lines of code
        }
    }

Let me know if it worked out for you

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I have also witnessed the Times.Exactly(1) verification failure across unit tests using MoQ, with a "was called 2 times" error message. I see this as a bug in MoQ, as I would expect clean mock states on every test run.

My work around was to assign a new mock instance and test target in the test setup.

private Mock<IEntityMapper> entityMapperMock;
private OverdraftReportMapper target;

[SetUp]
public void TestSetUp()
{
  entityMapperMock = new Mock<IEntityMapper>();
  target = new OverdraftReportMapper(entityMapperMock.Object);
} 
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly how it should be done. –  Jan Jul 26 '13 at 10:03

You could use the Callback method instead of Verify, and count the calls.

This is demonstrated on the Moq Quick Start page, thus:

// returning different values on each invocation
var mock = new Mock<IFoo>();
var calls = 0;
mock.Setup(foo => foo.GetCountThing())
    .Returns(() => calls)
    .Callback(() => calls++);
// returns 0 on first invocation, 1 on the next, and so on
Console.WriteLine(mock.Object.GetCountThing());
share|improve this answer

In case MOQ people are listening, I have a case where I need to reset Verify also. I have about 200 tests in an NUnit test class. The SUT is quite complicated to setup (we need 6 mocks and some other setup code). In our entire test suite we have about 7000 tests and we are having mem problems so I'm trying to eliminate mem requirements. I want to move all mock calls to the TestFixtureSetUp instead of SetUp. This worked except for the few cases that check to see if a method was called exactly once. The second test that checked for Times.Exactly(1) now fails. If I could reset the Verify, I could reuse the Mock and use mem much more wisely.

I know I could move the setup to a separate method. Please don't chastise me for that. I'm just presenting a valid case where being able to reset Verify would be of use.

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I also have another valid case - where the mock needs to be static as it's put into a static variable in the class (a logger). The workaround I used was the one mentioned elsewhere of incrementing a call count variable –  Paul Hatcher Nov 28 '12 at 10:21
2  
@BradIrby I was having this same issue and stumbled upon a magical MOQ extension function called Moq.MockExtensions.ResetCalls(). It was probably created long after this post. –  stackunderflow May 8 at 17:52

This is indeed unit test abuse as you are verifying two things in one test. Your life would be much easier if you took the ObjectUnderTest initialisation out of the test and into a common setup method. Then your tests become much more readable and independant of each other.

More than production code, test code should be optimized for readability and isolation. A test for one aspect of system's behavior should not affect other aspects. It really is much much easier to refactor common code into a setup method than to try to reset the mock objects.

ObjectUnderTest _objectUnderTest;

[Setup] //Gets run before each test
public void Setup() {
    var foo = new Mock<IFoo>(); //moq by default creates loose mocks
    _objectUnderTest = new ObjectUnderTest(foo.Object);
}
[Test]
public void DoStuffToPushIntoState1ShouldCallFizz() {
    _objectUnderTest.DoStuffToPushIntoState1(); // this is various lines of code and setup

    foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz());
}
[Test]
public void DoStuffToPushIntoState2ShouldntCallFizz() {
{
    objectUnderTest.DoStuffToPushIntoState2(); // more lines of code
    foo.Verify(x => x.Fizz(), Times.Never());
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Sorry, I know this is a bit old, but I think this doesn't address the problem in the question, and I would like to know if there's an easy way to extend it to do so. Specifically, DoStuffToPushIntoState2 will only work if the object is already in state 1. If the API of the object only allows it to transition into state 1 by invocation of DoStuffToPushIntoState1, and in doing so it always invokes Fizz, then even if you did DoStuffToPushIntoState1 during the setup, you still could not distinguish calls to Fizz caused by DoStuffToPushIntoState2. –  Weeble Aug 5 '11 at 14:58
    
correct @Weeble –  Stephane Aug 26 '11 at 8:14

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