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I have a class library that contains a number of classes. I would like to dynamically create an instance of one of these classes, set its properties, and call a method.

Example:

Public Interface IExample
    Sub DoSomething()
End Interface

Public Class ExampleClass
    Implements IExample

    Dim _calculatedValue as Integer

    Public Property calculatedValue() as Integer
        Get
            return _calculatedValue
        End Get
        Set(ByVal value As Integer)
            _calculatedValue= value
        End Set
    End Property        

    Public Sub DoSomething() Implements IExample.DoSomething
        _calculatedValue += 5
    End Sub
End Class

Public Class Example2
    Implements IExample

    Dim _calculatedValue as Integer

    Public Property calculatedValue() as Integer
        Get
            return _calculatedValue
        End Get
        Set(ByVal value As Integer)
            _calculatedValue = value
        End Set
    End Property        

    Public Sub DoSomething() Implements IExample.DoSomething
        _calculatedValue += 7
    End Sub
End Class

So, I want to then create code as follows.

Private Function DoStuff() as Integer
    dim resultOfSomeProcess as String = "Example2"

    dim instanceOfExampleObject as new !!!resultOfSomeProcess!!! <-- this is it

    instanceOfExampleObject.calculatedValue = 6
    instanceOfExampleObject.DoSomething()

    return instanceOfExampleObject.calculatedValue
End Function

Example1 and Example2 may have different properties, which I need to set...

Is this doable?

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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use Activator.CreateInstance for this. The easiest way (IMO) is to first create a Type object and pass that to Activator.CreateInstance:

Dim theType As Type = Type.GetType(theTypename)
If theType IsNot Nothing Then
    Dim instance As IExample = DirectCast(Activator.CreateInstance(theType), IExample)
    ''# use instance
End If

Note though that the string containing the type name must contain the full type name, including the namespace.

If you need to access more specialized members on the types, you will still need to cast them (unless VB.NET has incorporated something similar to dynamic in C#, which I am not aware of).

share|improve this answer
    
Probably a dumb question, but how would I then set the properties of instance without casting it? (as I don't know what to cast it to) –  tardomatic Nov 12 '10 at 12:17
    
@tardomatic: excellent question; I was editing that into the answer as you posed it :) –  Fredrik Mörk Nov 12 '10 at 12:18
1  
Small improvements: Not … Is Nothing => … IsNot Nothing. – CType => DirectCast (in this case). –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 12 '10 at 12:20
    
@Konrad: thanks! I have been away from VB.NET for quite some time now, some stuff has obviously faded. –  Fredrik Mörk Nov 12 '10 at 12:22
    
I was considering some sort of 'object factory' that would return the instance of the class I would like, but this would again leave me without being able to change the properties of the object (and a rather large case statement...) any other ideas as to how to solve this type of problem? –  tardomatic Nov 12 '10 at 12:24
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