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So here is the Josephus problem on wiki. The problem that I have is a linear variation of this, but I will restate the whole problem for clarity.

( Numbers = Natural Numbers )

There is a process that is eliminating numbers in the following manner:

i=2
while 1:
    remove numbers that are *placed* at positions divisible by i
    i+=1

You are also given a number K, you have to confirm if this number K will survive the elimination.

E.g. ( assuming index starts at 0 )

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16 ...
0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8, 9,10,11,12,13,14,15 ...  (indices)

After step 1 ( elimination at i=2 )
2,4,6,8,10,12,14,16 ... 
0,1,2,3, 4, 5, 6, 7 ... (indices)

After step 2 (elimination at i=3 )
2,4,6,10,12,16 ... ( 8 and 14 got removed cause they were at index 3 and 6 resp. )
0,1,2, 3, 4, 5 ... (indices)

As we can see 2,4,6 are safe after this step, since the process will be choosing higher and higher values for elimination.

So once again, given a K how do you determine if K will be safe ?

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Is i being incremented within the while loop in the first code snippet? –  MAK Nov 12 '10 at 12:39
    
woops :) fixed. –  bronzebeard Nov 12 '10 at 13:04
    
There's an inconsistency in your example. In your first step (elimination at positions that are multiples of 2) you eliminate the number at position 0. But in your second step (elimination at positions that are multiples of 3) the number at position 0 survives. Can you clarify whether this is intentional? –  Gareth Rees Nov 12 '10 at 13:19
    
yeah, that is kind of a problem, i didn't want to start indices from 1, so i started it from 0, but the crux of the thing is that if you evaluating i, you won't consider indices < i. I will fix the example asap. thanks –  bronzebeard Nov 12 '10 at 14:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The question doesn't make it clear exactly what happens to the number at position 0. In the example, at step 1, the number 1 (at position 0) is eliminated. But then at step 2 the number 2 (at position 0) survives.

I'm going to assume for the purposes of this answer that the example is in error and the number at position 0 always survives. So the example should look like this:

Initial position

 Number    1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 ...
 Position  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... 

After step 1:

 Number    1  2  4  6  8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 ...
 Position  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ...

After step 2:

 Number    1  2  4  8 10 14 16 20 22 26 28 32 34 38 40 44 46 ...
 Position  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ...

This leads to the sequence 1, 2, 4, 8, 14, 20, 28, 40, ... which is not found in OEIS (but see addendum below).

Here's how you might determine if a particular number K survives, without computing the whole sequence:

Let J₁ = K − 1 (the initial position of K).

  • K is eliminated at step 1 if J₁>0 and 2|J₁, but if not, its new index is J₂ = J₁ − ⌊J₁/2⌋
  • K is eliminated at step 2 if J₂>0 and 3|J₂, but if not, its new index is J₃ = J₂ − ⌊J₂/3⌋
  • and so on, until either K is eliminated, or until Ji < i+1, when we know that K survives.

ADDENDUM

I was a bit hasty when I concluded that this sequence isn't in OEIS. For suppose we had numbered the positions starting at 1 instead of 0. Then we'd get the sequence 1, 3, 7, 13, 19, 27, 39, ... which is OEIS sequence A000960, "Flavius Josephus's sieve". Still no closed-form solution, though.

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those floor s look weird :) and thanks for OEIS, I didn't know about. –  bronzebeard Nov 12 '10 at 20:07
    
Yes, some fonts seem to have these brackets in the wrong position. As for the OEIS, see my addendum. –  Gareth Rees Nov 13 '10 at 7:46
    
Thanks @Gareth. OEIS seems to be a wonderful resource and your answer appears to be working as well, I wish I could +1 twice. –  bronzebeard Nov 13 '10 at 9:54

One solution is to keep track of the index of K within the list at every iteration.

At every step, we first check if the index of K is divisible by. If it is, we return false. Otherwise, we simply subtract the number of elements before K that are divisible by i from the index of K (i.e. K is shifted that many times to the left).

We continue doing this until only one element is left.

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