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Often I need to choose what to do according to the value of a non-POD constant element, something like this:

switch( str ) {
  case "foo": ...
  case "bar": ...
  default:    ...
}

Sadly switch can only be used with integers: error: switch quantity not an integer.

The most trivial way to implement such thing is then to have is a sequence of ifs:

if( str == "foo" )      ...
else if( str == "bar" ) ...
else                    ...

But this solution looks dirty and should cost O(n), where n is the number of cases, while that piece of code could cost O(log n) at the worst case with a binary search.

Using some data structs (like Maps) it could be possible to obtain an integer representing the string ( O(log n) ), and then use an O(1) switch, or one could implement a static binary sort by nesting ifs in the right way, but still these hacks would require a lot of coding, making everything more complex and harder to maintain.

What's the best way to do this? (fast, clean and simple, as the switch statement is)

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obtain an integer.... is not O( log n ) if n represents the number of options. It's rather O( nbcharacters ). –  xtofl Nov 12 '10 at 13:35
6  
If there are enough items in your list that O(n) vs. O(lg n) makes a huge difference, that's probably an indication that you should not be using a switch in the first place. –  Billy ONeal Nov 12 '10 at 13:37
2  
Possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/4014827/… –  kotlinski Nov 12 '10 at 13:42
3  
@kotlinski: that "possible duplicate" is tagged C only, whereas this assumes C++ (See the str=="foo" condition, which doesn't work in C). –  MSalters Nov 12 '10 at 13:49
1  
@peoro: OK, I'm overruled here, but your point 1 is awfully wrong. Why? Two reasons, both equally bad: a) "foo" is a const char*, not a char*, and b) for a char pointer, the equality will not do what is intended (in all situations, some compiler optimizations might make it do what you want, but it's still incorrect): you are comparing pointer values, and not the contents of the array. This is an important difference, and that's why @MSalters comment above and @Kos's answer below for what really happens. I agree, it's an awful example ;) –  rubenvb Dec 20 '10 at 19:09
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14 Answers

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Using some nasty macro and template magic it's possible to get an unrolled binary search at compiletime with pretty syntax -- but the MATCHES ("case") have to be sorted: fastmatch.h

NEWMATCH
MATCH("asd")
  some c++ code
MATCH("bqr")
  ... the buffer for the match is in _buf
MATCH("zzz")
  ...  user.YOURSTUFF 
/*ELSE 
  optional
*/
ENDMATCH(xy_match)

This will generate (roughly) a function bool xy_match(char *&_buf,T &user), so it must be at the outer level. Call it e.g. with:

xy_match("bqr",youruserdata);

And the breaks are implicit, you cannot fall-thru. It's also not heavily documented, sorry. But you'll find, that there are some more usage-possibilities, have a look. NOTE: Only tested with g++.

Update C++11:

Lambdas and initializier list make things much prettier (no macros involved!):

#include <utility>
#include <algorithm>
#include <initializer_list>

template <typename KeyType,typename FunPtrType,typename Comp>
void Switch(const KeyType &value,std::initializer_list<std::pair<const KeyType,FunPtrType>> sws,Comp comp) {
  typedef std::pair<const KeyType &,FunPtrType> KVT;
  auto cmp=[&comp](const KVT &a,const KVT &b){ return comp(a.first,b.first); };
  auto val=KVT(value,FunPtrType());
  auto r=std::lower_bound(sws.begin(),sws.end(),val,cmp);
  if ( (r!=sws.end())&&(!cmp(val,*r)) ) {
    r->second();
  } // else: not found
}

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
  Switch<const char *,void (*)()>("ger",{ // sorted:                      
    {"asdf",[]{ printf("0\n"); }},
    {"bde",[]{ printf("1\n"); }},
    {"ger",[]{ printf("2\n"); }}
  },[](const char *a,const char *b){ return strcmp(a,b)<0;});           
  return 0;
}

That's the idea. A more complete implementation can be found here: switch.hpp.

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1  
+1 for an interesting library solution that closely approximates what the OP wants. –  Billy ONeal Nov 12 '10 at 13:56
    
Interestng. I wonder how this can be developed to be a more robust slution not using macros. Good starting point to a new approach. –  John Dibling Nov 12 '10 at 14:02
    
@John: I don't think it's possible w/o macros, as I have to use two templates (template-specializations) per MATCH to calculate the binary search at compile time. It was the closest I could come to a 'switch'. Even the unrolled-ness is unavoidable, dictated by the way template-metaprogramming works. I didn't even believe this would be possible in C++ -- until I got it to compile and saw it work. –  smilingthax Nov 12 '10 at 14:18
    
+1 This mimics for non-integer values what the compiler does for integer values. The compiler resorts to jump tables or static binary trees to optimize case lookup (and subsequent branch). But all said, if we are going to do things at runtime to enable this abstraction, then a dictionary, would seem like, is the answer. I mean, OP should not get hung up on making the syntax look similar to a switch statement. A dictionary gives him exactly the same thing at runtime what a switch does for integers. –  Ziffusion Nov 12 '10 at 16:58
    
There is a much better way without macros, in fact: generate a perfect hash function using gperf. gnu.org/software/gperf –  Wade Jun 19 '12 at 16:29
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In C++, you can obtain O(lg n) performance by having a std::map<std::string, functionPointerType>. (In C you could implement what was essentially the same but it would be more difficult) Pull out the right function pointer using std::map<k, v>::find, and call that pointer. Of course, that's not going to be nearly as simple as a language supported switch statement. On the other hand, if you have enough items that there's going to be a huge difference between O(n) and O(lg n), that's probably an indication that you should be going for a different design in the first place.

Personally, I've always found the ELSEIF chain more readable anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for suggesting std::map, but elseif is IMO bad for long list of items –  BЈовић Nov 12 '10 at 13:43
1  
@VJo: If your list of items is long enough you should replace it with some form of polymorphic behavior anyway. –  Billy ONeal Nov 12 '10 at 13:44
1  
In C you can use a sorted list and bsearch. The original Awk implementation does this for keywords. In C++, an unordered_map does it in O(n). –  larsmans Nov 12 '10 at 13:48
    
@larsmans: That would be a good C solution. Perhaps an answer we can upvote? :) Though : unordered_map is not yet standard, which prevents me from using it in a recommendation (If I won't use it, I don't see how I could ask others to use it), and of course using bsearch requires that your strings already be sorted. –  Billy ONeal Nov 12 '10 at 13:51
    
@Billy Not necessarily. For example, if you want to map strings to some constant integer values. You can initialize the map using boost::assign::map_list_of –  BЈовић Nov 12 '10 at 13:52
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You can achieve it without using any map or unordered_map like below. Compare first character alone to identify which string. If more than one match, then you can fallback to if/else chain within that case statement. Number of comparisons will be greatly reduced if not many strings starting with same letter.

char *str = "foo";
switch(*str)
{
case 'f':
    //do something for foo
    cout<<"Foo";
    break;
case 'b':
    //do something for bar
    break;
case 'c':
    if(strcmp(str, "cat") == 0)
    {
        //do something for cat
    }
    else if(strcmp(str, "camel") == 0)
    {
        //do something for camel
    }
}

This looks to be optimal solution without any cost, even though its not standard.

share|improve this answer
    
Why do you say it is not standard ? –  Alexandre C. Nov 12 '10 at 21:27
    
@Alexandre: I mean, I used strcmp with c-style string. If we use, std::string instead, then it would be optimal c++ soluiton. –  bjskishore123 Nov 13 '10 at 4:43
    
This is actually a pretty nice solution... :) –  rubenvb Dec 19 '10 at 10:13
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Use an if...else block. You don't really have a compelling reason not to, aside from it not being pretty to look at, and the if...else block is the mostr straightforward solution.

Everything else requires additional code which as say say increases complexity. And it just moves the ugliness to elsewhere. But at some level, a string compare still has to happen. Now you've just covered it up with more code.

You might gain some performance increases by using a map or a hash map, but youcan also gain similar if not better gains by simply choosing a smart order to evaluate your if...else blocks. And switching to a map for performance reasons is really just premature micro-optimization.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "switching to a map for performance reasons is really just premature micro-optimization". The main reason I suggest using something like a std::map in places like this is that it helps you maintain OCP. –  Billy ONeal Nov 12 '10 at 13:45
    
"at some level, a string compare still has to happen" - apparently the questioner is only comparing pointers, which is odd. –  Steve Jessop Nov 12 '10 at 13:48
    
@Steve: Really? If so, then he should be able to use a switch. –  John Dibling Nov 12 '10 at 13:49
    
@John: by casting to uintptr_t or some such, you mean? I'm pretty sure it's an error on the part of the questioner, actually, since there's no guarantee the "same" string literal in different places will have the same address. Just thought I'd mention that the "if/else" code in the question doesn't do string comparisons. –  Steve Jessop Nov 12 '10 at 13:52
1  
@John: oh, no, I take it all back. I missed that the question is about "C/C++", but actually not C at all. So str is a std::string, and you were right. –  Steve Jessop Nov 12 '10 at 13:56
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Something like that would be too much complex?

#include <iostream>
#include <map>

struct object
{
    object(int value): _value(value) {}

    bool operator< (object const& rhs) const
    {
        return _value < rhs._value;
    }

    int _value;
};

typedef void(*Func)();

void f1() {
    std::cout << "f1" << std::endl;
}

void f2() {
    std::cout << "f2" << std::endl;
}

void f3() {
    std::cout << "f3" << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    object o1(0);
    object o2(1);
    object o3(2);

    std::map<object, Func> funcMap;
    funcMap[o1] = f1;   
    funcMap[o2] = f2;   
    funcMap[o3] = f3;

    funcMap[object(0)](); // prints "f1"
    funcMap[object(1)](); // prints "f2"
    funcMap[object(2)](); // prints "f3"
}
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1  
+1 for codifying what I said earlier. Note that you're missing the return type on main (which is required in C++, or at least will be in C++0x, can't remember exactly atm) –  Billy ONeal Nov 12 '10 at 13:48
    
code corrected ;) –  Simone Nov 12 '10 at 13:50
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In C, there are two common solutions. The first is to keep your keywords in a sorted array, say

typedef struct Keyword {
    const char *word;
    int         sub;
    int         type;
} Keyword;

Keyword keywords[] ={   /* keep sorted: binary searched */
    { "BEGIN", XBEGIN, XBEGIN },
    { "END",   XEND,   XEND },
    { "NF",    VARNF,  VARNF },
    { "atan2", FATAN,  BLTIN },
    ...
};

and do a binary search on them. The previous is straight from the source code of awk by C grandmaster Brian W. Kernighan.

The other solution, which is O(min(m, n)) if n is the length of your input string and m the length of the longest keyword, is to use a finite-state solution such as a Lex program.

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+1 (For reasons already specified in comment in my answer) –  Billy ONeal Nov 12 '10 at 13:59
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Here is example code that works:

This should work.
(but ONLY on strings that are 4-bytes or less)

This treats the strings as 4-byte integers.

This is considered, ugly, not portable, "hacky", and not at all good style. But it does do what you wanted.

#include "Winsock2.h"
#pragma comment(lib,"ws2_32.lib")

void main()
{
  char day[20];
  printf("Enter the short name of day");

  scanf("%s", day);

  switch(htonl(*((unsigned long*)day)))
  {
    case 'sun\0':
      printf("sunday");
      break;
    case 'mon\0':
      printf("monday");
      break;
    case 'Tue\0':
      printf("Tuesday");
      break;
    case 'wed\0':
      printf("wednesday");
      break;
    case 'Thu\0':
      printf("Thursday");
      break;
    case 'Fri\0':
      printf("friday");
      break;
    case 'sat\0':
      printf("saturday");
      break;
  }
}

tested in MSVC2010

share|improve this answer
    
Not portable. The byte order of multi-char constants is undefined and has no link to the endianess of the platform . –  tristopia Sep 3 '13 at 12:57
    
Agreed, not portable. But on x86-Windows, this is worked. –  abelenky Sep 3 '13 at 14:20
    
on x86 on windows on this implementation of the compiler. I had the case that it changed between two version of the same compiler (gcc v3 vs gcc v4 on Solaris-SPARC). –  tristopia Sep 3 '13 at 17:15
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you could still use a switch.. if you know the labels before hand.. (this is quite nasty (i.e. no checks, but that should be trivial to add as long as you have a valid null terminated string!), I should imagine that this performs faster than most options?

//labels: "abc", "foo", "bar", "ant" "do"

switch(lbl[0])
{
  case 'a':
  {
    switch(lbl[1])
    {
      case 'b': // abc
      case 'n': // ant
      default:  // doofus!
    }
  }
  case 'b':
  {
    switch(lbl[1])
    {
      case 'a': //bar
      default:  // doofus
    }
  }
  case 'd':
  {
    switch(lbl[1])
    {
      case 'o': //do
      default:  // doofus
    }
  }
  case 'f':
  {
    switch(lbl[1])
    {
      case 'o': //foo
      default:  // doofus
    }
  }
}

Of course, if you have a very large list of "labels", this will become quite complicated...

share|improve this answer
2  
Ugh. Removing the extraneous {} would make this is a bit more readable, but I'd switch to something like Lex for this. –  larsmans Nov 12 '10 at 14:23
    
@larsmans: Now if only (f)lex would support Unicode, then all would be good ;) –  Billy ONeal Nov 12 '10 at 15:32
    
@larsmans, I did say it was nasty! ;) anyways, it is pseudocode, so needs to be done properly... –  Nim Nov 13 '10 at 13:20
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You can use my switch macros, which support all kind of value types. For a few cases, using op== a few times in a row is an order of magnitudes faster than creating map each time and looking up in it.

 sswitch(s) {
    scase("foo"): {
      std::cout << "s is foo" << std::endl;
      break; // could fall-through if we wanted
    }

    // supports brace-less style too
    scase("bar"):
      std::cout << "s is bar" << std::endl;
      break;

    // default must be at the end
    sdefault():
      std::cout << "neither of those!" << std::endl;
      break;
 }
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Well, this will cost O(n). Of course creating a map will cost so much more (especially if you're using it for three cases like in your example), but it will be worth it, if you've got many cases and run the switch tons of times. –  peoro Dec 20 '10 at 18:58
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Note that switching by const char* wouldn't work as intended anyway, even if it's was allowed.

A C String is actually a pointer to char. A code like you suggested:

// pseudocode (incorrect C!):
switch(str) {
   case "a": ...
   case "b": ...
}

Provided our language is consistent - it would compare the pointer values, and not the actual string content. Comparing strings needs a strcmp(), so even if the compiler had a special case like "if we're switching against a char*, use strcmp() instead of == (which would probably be poor language design anyway), then anyway it would be impossible for the compiler to make this work like the O(1) hack with integers and jumps.

So don't feel bad for C/C++ as it's not supported. :)

I recommend the O(logn) solution with map (string -> funcptr) or (string -> some abstract object) - if you feel you need scalability here. If you don't, there's nothing particularly wrong with the O(n) solution with else if's. It's still clear, maintainable code, so there's nothing to feel bad about.

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I believe the OP understands all of that. The compiler could still make the switch O(lg n) w.r.t. the number of strings. –  Billy ONeal Nov 12 '10 at 13:49
    
I initially thought what you thought, but the question specifies that str is non-POD. So it's a std::string, not a pointer. In this case "C/C++" actually means "C++", not either of the more-common meanings "C or C++", and "C that also compiles as C++". –  Steve Jessop Nov 12 '10 at 13:59
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It comes to my mind a metaprogramming-based hash generator that you can use like in this example. This one is for c++0x, but I'm sure you can reproduce it similarly for standard C++.

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Some time ago, I have written a templated class achieving some sort of switch equivalent, usable on any data type. However, there are some constraints that limit its application fields:

  • the task to achieve on each branch must be a function call.
  • the functions to call have a single argument (or none, or two, you can tweak the template, but it has to be the same for all functions).
  • the argument value passed to the functions will be the same in every case (but it is given at the moment the switch is executed).

As an example, say, you want to switch on a value of type MyType, if it is equal to value1, call function1("abc"), if it is equal to value2, call function2("abc") (and so on). This would end up as:

// set up the object
//               Type  -        function sig       - function arg. type
SWITCH mySwitch< MyType, void(*)(const std::string&), std::string >;
mySwitch.Add( value1, function1 );
mySwitch.Add( value2, function2 );
mySwitch.AddDefault( function_def );

// process the value
MyType a =...// whatever.
mySwitch.Process( a, "abc" );

Basically, it wraps a std::map container, holding the pair value/function. It can also handle the "default", that makes a switch so interesting. It can be easily adapted to other situations. Here is the code:

template < typename KEY, typename FUNC, typename ARG >
class SWITCH
{
    public:
    SWITCH()
    {
      Def = 0; // no default function at startup
    }

    void Process( const KEY& key, ARG arg )
    {
      typename std::map< KEY, FUNC >::const_iterator it = my_map.find( key );
      if( it != my_map.end() )  // If key exists, call
         it->second( arg );    // associated function
      else               // else, call
        if( Def )       // default function, if there is one.
           Def( arg );  // else, do nothing
    }

    void Add( const KEY& key, FUNC my_func )
    {
      typename std::map< KEY, FUNC >::const_iterator it = my_map.find( key );
      if( it != my_map.end() )
      {
        throw "Already defined !\n";
      }
      my_map[ key ] = my_func;
    }

    void AddDefault( FUNC f )
    {
      Def = f;
    }

 private:
   std::map< KEY, FUNC > my_map;
   FUNC Def; // default function
 };

Other details are here.

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You may take a look at my solutions using macros at http://programming.sirrida.de/programming.html#c_case_of_string.

The fastest presented solution is case_map.c which uses an optimized (not necessarily perfect) hash container created at run time the first time the switch is used. It even runs under plain C. C++ is not needed.

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This is similar in spirit to the lambda and the unordered_map solutions, but I think this is the best of both worlds, with a very natural and readable syntax:

#include "switch.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main(int argc, const char* argv[])
{
    std::string str(argv[1]);
    Switch(str)
        .Case("apple",  []() { std::cout << "apple" << std::endl; })
        .Case("banana", []() { std::cout << "banana" << std::endl; })
        .Default(       []() { std::cout << "unknown" << std::endl; });    
    return 0;
}

switch.h:

#include <unordered_map>
#include <functional>
template<typename Key>
class Switcher {
public:
    typedef std::function<void()> Func;
    Switcher(Key key) : m_impl(), m_default(), m_key(key) {}
    Switcher& Case(Key key, Func func) {
        m_impl.insert(std::make_pair(key, func));
        return *this;
    }
    Switcher& Default(Func func) {
        m_default = func;
        return *this;
    }
    ~Switcher() {
        auto iFunc = m_impl.find(m_key);
        if (iFunc != m_impl.end())
            iFunc->second();
        else
            m_default();
    }
private:
    std::unordered_map<Key, Func> m_impl;
    Func m_default;
    Key m_key;
};
template<typename Key>
Switcher<Key> Switch(Key key)
{
    return Switcher<Key>(key);
}
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