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I have a class Foo that contains a map and provides begin() and end() functions to iterate over it:

class Foo {
  typedef std::map<int, double> Container;
  typedef Container::const_iterator const_iterator;
  Container c_;
 public:
  const_iterator begin() const { return c_.begin(); }
  const_iterator end() const { return c_.end(); }
  void insert(int i, double d) { c_[i] = d; }
  // ...

};

Now I would like to change it internally from std::map<int, double> to just a std::set<int>, but I don't want to break any client code.

So the double d in the insert function would now just be ignored. And the following code should still be valid, where it->second will now just always be 0.0:

Foo foo;
for(Foo::const_iterator it = foo.begin(); it != foo.end(); ++it) {
  std::cout << it->first << " " << it->second << std::endl;
}

How can I make these changes in the Foo class?

In other words, how can I provide a Foo::const_iterator that adapts the new internal std::set<int>::const_iterator to behave like the old std::map<int,double>::const_iterator?

UPDATE: The reason I want to get rid of the map is memory efficiency. I have millions of Foo instances and cannot afford to store the double values in them.

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3  
To be honest, that sounds like a really bad idea. Keeping the contract compatible when the semantics have completely changed isn’t meaningful. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 12 '10 at 14:25
1  
@KonradRudolph C++ has been doing that since day one. –  wilhelmtell Nov 12 '10 at 14:35
    
@wilhelm: That’s true. But not a reason to do the same. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 12 '10 at 14:41
    
@Konrad true. I was kidding: in C++ it was part of the (now questionable?) design. Here it's an apparent consequence, something we might be able to avoid. Backward-compatibility is a pita, something to do only when you absolutely have to. –  wilhelmtell Nov 12 '10 at 14:50

5 Answers 5

Would using

std::set<std::pair<int, double> >

not be sufficient for this comparability?

Failing that you can always write your own iterator which wraps the std::list iterator and provides first and second members. Basically your operator++ would call operator++ on the real iterator etc. and the de-referencing operator could return either a temporary std::pair (by value) or a reference to a std::pair that lives within the iterator itself (if your legacy code can deal with that).

Update, slightly contrived example, might work depending on your scenario:

#include <iostream>
#include <set>

class Foo {
  typedef std::set<int> Container;
  typedef Container::const_iterator legacy_iterator;
  Container c_;

  // legacy iterator doesn't have a virtual destructor (probably?), shouldn't
  // be a problem for sane usage though
  class compat_iterator : public legacy_iterator {
  public:
     compat_iterator(const legacy_iterator& it) : legacy_iterator(it) {
     }

     const std::pair<int,double> *operator->() const {
        static std::pair<int,double> value;
        value = std::make_pair(**this, 0.0);
        // Not meeting the usual semantics!
        return &value;
     }
  };
 public:
  typedef compat_iterator const_iterator;

  const_iterator begin() const { return c_.begin(); }
  const_iterator end() const { return c_.end(); }

};



int main() {

  Foo foo;
  for(Foo::const_iterator it = foo.begin(); it != foo.end(); ++it) {
     std::cout << it->first << " " << it->second << std::endl;
  }

}
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No, I should have said this: The reason I need a set now is I want to save memory. I have millions of Foo instances and cannot afford to store the double anymore. –  Frank Nov 12 '10 at 14:22
    
I've updated my answer to add an example of something that implements compatibility with only minimal extra overheads. Of course taking the address of either of the members of the pair would be a bad idea now, but if the legacy code doesn't rely on it then it might solve your problem. –  Flexo Nov 12 '10 at 14:42

How about something like this?

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <set>

struct Funky
{
    int first;
    static const double second;

    Funky(int i)
    :   first(i)
    {}
};

const double Funky::second = 0.0;

bool operator<(const Funky& lhs, const Funky& rhs)
{
    return lhs.first < rhs.first;
}

class Foo
{
private:
    //std::map<int,double> m_data;
    std::set<Funky> m_data;
public:
    //typedef std::map<int,double>::const_iterator const_iterator;
    typedef std::set<Funky>::const_iterator const_iterator;

    const_iterator begin() const
    {
        return m_data.begin();
    }

    const_iterator end() const
    {
        return m_data.end();
    }

    void insert(int i, double d)
    {
        //m_data.insert(std::make_pair(i, d));
        m_data.insert(i);
    }
};

int main()
{
    Foo foo;
    foo.insert(23, 9.0);
    for(Foo::const_iterator it=foo.begin(), iend=foo.end(); it!=iend; ++it)
    {
        std::cout << it->first << ' ' << it->second << '\n';
    }
    return 0;
}
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One thing I should point out is that anything that tries to change it->second will now fail -- so you might want to get rid of the const. Alternatively, you might want people to know what's going on... –  Stuart Golodetz Nov 12 '10 at 15:08
    
(I do think the whole idea of doing this sort of thing is rather ill-advised, for the record...) –  Stuart Golodetz Nov 12 '10 at 15:10
    
I do not think that redefinition of operator< is necessary, default should be sufficient. –  Luca Martini Nov 12 '10 at 15:41
    
AFAICS it's completely necessary (and g++ agrees) -- why do you think it isn't? –  Stuart Golodetz Nov 12 '10 at 16:02
    
Comeau also agrees, incidentally. –  Stuart Golodetz Nov 12 '10 at 16:03

Perhaps something along the lines of

operator int()(const std::pair<int, double>& p) const {
    return p.first;
}

maybe within some wrapper?

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Perhaps you can define a fake_pair class that implements first and second and put a set<fake_pair> inside Foo.

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You can't, not completely. The problem is you are changing your interface, which will always break your clients. I would recommend you create two new functions of newBegin and newEnd (or similar) which has your new behaviour. Your old interface you keep this the same but mark it as depreciated. The implementation of this old interface can use one of the work around described by the others.

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