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I am creating a SQL Static Code analyzer. Should the following query be considered as containing a cartesian join: select t2.*
from test1 t1,
test2 t2,
test3 t3
where (t1.col1 = t2.col2
and t2.col3 = t3.col4)
or
(t1.col1 = t3.col2
and t2.col2 = t1.col1)

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1  
The implicit syntax should never be used in any query let alone a complex one. The fact that you have to ask this question is one reson why. If you are doing a code analyzer it should report any implicit join as incorrect. –  HLGEM Nov 12 '10 at 14:19

2 Answers 2

No, that is no a cartesian join. It may be a bad one but not a cartesian.

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Thanks Octavia for the quick reply. –  Nehu Nov 12 '10 at 14:39

Should the following query be considered as containing a cartesian join

I would consider it to be so without analysis, and I'd demand it be rewriten without the commas. Then I'd demand it be written without the OR.

And here it is:

select t2.*
from test2 t2
where t2.col2 in (SELECT t1.col1 FROM test1 t1 WHERE t1.col1 is not null)
  and t2.col3 in (SELECT t3.col4 FROM test3 t3 WHERE t3.col4 is not null)
UNION
select t2.*
from test2 t2
where t2.col2 in (SELECT t1.col1 FROM test1 t1 WHERE t1.col1 is not null)
  and t2.col2 in (SELECT t3.col2 FROM test3 t3 WHERE t3.col2 is not null)

Or more traditionally:

select t2.* 
from test2 t2 
  JOIN test1 t1 ON t1.col1 = t2.col2
  JOIN test3 t3 ON t2.col3 = t3.col4
UNION 
select t2.* 
from test2 t2 
  JOIN test1 t1 ON t1.col1 = t2.col2
  JOIN test3 t3 ON t2.col2 = t3.col2
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Thanks David for the quick reply. So, what do you say, should the code analyzer flag the query as "Probably containing a cartesian Join"? –  Nehu Nov 12 '10 at 14:39
    
Your rewrite demonstrates nicely why 'old style' joins remain in the SQL Standard (and probably always will) i.e. because the same joins are much more complex (to the human coder's eye) to express using SQL-92 infix notation. –  onedaywhen Nov 12 '10 at 15:10
    
@onedaywhen, shrug - when I see t2.*, I think that duplication introduced by joining is undesire-able and I revert to filtering. See my latest edit for a more traditional JOIN (which is in fact easier to write/read). –  David B Nov 12 '10 at 17:54
    
@Nehu, I was answering in my own voice... I don't know what a code analyzer should do except possibly warn on the cartesian syntax. –  David B Nov 12 '10 at 17:56
    
When a query returns duplicate rows it cannot be decomposed simply into a UNION –  fredt Nov 13 '10 at 23:55

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