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Any grammar can I implement by operator precedence parsing?

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..........what? – Matt Ball Nov 12 '10 at 14:26
This sounds like homework, because if you were really interested in this you would know the answer. – Klaus Byskov Pedersen Nov 12 '10 at 14:28
Are you asking if you can change the operator precedence? The more I read your "question" the more my internal grammar-parser is beaten like an unwanted step-child. – Moo-Juice Nov 12 '10 at 14:29
can i implement if else statement by operator precedence parsing? if yes how? – sanjoy saha Nov 12 '10 at 14:34
Still not clear. Are you saying that, given a grammar which has arithmetic precedence (although this need be specified outside the grammar), can you convert it into a form where you obtain the same grammar with operator precedence observed, but no need for precedence/association rules? If so, then the answer is yes. – Kizaru Nov 12 '10 at 14:36

2 Answers 2

If you are asking if you can change the operator precedence of a language through the grammar, then the answer is: yes, of course.

If you are asking if you can parse a "typical" context-free grammar using Pratt's method of top down operator parsing, then the answer is no. BUT you can mix the two. A good article covering Pratt parsing that should give you some info on applying this to a recursive descent parser:

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This is an excellent question, for which the answer is: yes. It appears as a doubly-starred problem (#4.21) in Chapter Four of the Hopcroft & Ullman text on Computability and Formal Languages. The answer (a summarized proof by construction) is also provided. Very briefly, it assumes pre-conversion to Reduced GNF, from which the final construction is performed to remove adjacent non-terminals. Not the most efficient construction, but it works (if you can follow the similar treatment for conversion to CNF and GNF earlier). Hope this helps!

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