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I'm trying to get this rock paper scissors game to either return a Boolean value, as in set player_wins to True or False, depending on if the player wins, or to refactor this code entirely so that it doesn't use a while loop. I'm coming from the sysadmin side of the world, so please be gentle if this is written in the wrong style. I have tried a few things, and I understand TIMTOWTDI, and would just like some input.

Thanks.

import random

global player_wins
player_wins=None

def rps():

    player_score = 0
    cpu_score = 0

    while player_score < 3 and cpu_score < 3:

        WEAPONS = 'Rock', 'Paper', 'Scissors'

        for i in range(0, 3):
          print "%d %s" % (i + 1, WEAPONS[i])

        player = int(input ("Choose from 1-3: ")) - 1
        cpu = random.choice(range(0, 3))

        print "%s vs %s" % (WEAPONS[player], WEAPONS[cpu])
        if cpu != player:
          if (player - cpu) % 3 < (cpu - player) % 3:
            player_score += 1
            print "Player wins %d games\n" % player_score
          else:
            cpu_score += 1
            print "CPU wins %d games\n" % cpu_score
        else:
          print "tie!\n"
rps()

I'm trying to do something like this:

   print "%s vs %s" % (WEAPONS[player], WEAPONS[cpu])
    if cpu != player:
      if (player - cpu) % 3 < (cpu - player) % 3:
        player_score += 1
        print "Player wins %d games\n" % player_score
        if player_score == 3:
            return player_wins==True
      else:
        cpu_score += 1
        print "CPU wins %d games\n" % cpu_score
        if cpu_score == 3:
            return player_wins==False
    else:
      print "tie!\n"
share|improve this question
1  
What boolean value should be returned for a tie? –  Mark Peters Nov 12 '10 at 15:10
    
Because it's inside a while loop, ties just dump you back at the beginning. REMATCH! –  matt Nov 12 '10 at 15:14
    
I take it this is not a good project to gain a proper understanding of programming? –  matt Nov 12 '10 at 15:19
1  
matt, try doing projects that make you think more about the process. Try the problems at Project Euler (projecteuler.net) instead. –  syrion Nov 12 '10 at 15:25
1  
"I understand that TIMTOWTDI" - you must be confusing Python with Perl ;) "There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it. Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch." (PEP 20 aka The Zen Of Python) ;) –  delnan Nov 12 '10 at 15:36
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2 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Ignoring the refactoring issues, you need to understand functions and return values. You don't need a global at all. Ever. You can do this:

def rps():
    # Code to determine if player wins
    if player_wins:
        return True

    return False

Then, just assign a value to the variable outside this function like so:

player_wins = rps()

It will be assigned the return value (either True or False) of the function you just called.


After the comments, I decided to add that idiomatically, this would be better expressed thus:

 def rps(): 
     # Code to determine if player wins, assigning a boolean value (True or False)
     # to the variable player_wins.

     return player_wins

 pw = rps()

This assigns the boolean value of player_wins (inside the function) to the pw variable outside the function.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I see now. I got it, thank you. I will update this post to reflect the solution. –  matt Nov 12 '10 at 15:22
1  
This code hurts my eyes... it ought to be return player_wins –  Rafe Kettler Nov 12 '10 at 15:25
    
Sure, Rafe, but that wouldn't be as clear for illustrative purposes. –  syrion Nov 12 '10 at 15:29
    
It would be clearer to eliminate if expression: return True. –  S.Lott Nov 12 '10 at 15:38
1  
Okay, I added the idiomatic Python. I still think it's less clear, because it requires more understanding of return than you can presume in someone who has never used it. –  syrion Nov 12 '10 at 15:45
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Have your tried using the 'return' keyword?

def rps():
    return True
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