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In git, I've been making commits onto the master branch, when really I should have been working on a feature branch. I want to change this so that master is back to where it started, and what was on master is now on a new branch. Basically, my commit history looks like this:

A -- B -- C -- D -- E
          |         |
          |       master
     origin/master

And I want it to look like this:

        master
          |
A -- B -- C -- D -- E
          |         |
          |       new_branch
     origin/master

How can I change where master points?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 30 down vote accepted
  • stash your uncommitted: git stash
  • create a new branch: git branch new_branch
  • reset master to origin/master: git reset --hard origin/master
  • checkout the new branch again: git checkout new_branch
  • unstash your changes: git stash pop

stash/unstash is not necessary if your working tree is clean. just make sure there are no changes in your working tree, because those will be removed when you reset --hard


another possibility (faster, and without the need to stash and reset):

  • checkout a new branch: git checkout -b new_branch master
  • create a 'new' master branch and point it to origin/master's commit: git branch -f master origin/master
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Note that the stash is only necessary if you have any uncommitted changes. –  Josh Lee Nov 12 '10 at 15:20
    
Stash commits? Most likely you meant local changes. –  Mot Nov 12 '10 at 15:20
    
If your working directory is clean you won't need the stash and unstash parts. Otherwise perfect: +1 –  Cameron Skinner Nov 12 '10 at 15:20
5  
Awesome! git reset --hard <commit> was exactly what i was looking for. –  Rudd Zwolinski Nov 12 '10 at 16:19
3  
You really should not modify files in .git/refs/ by hand (for one, any given ref might actually be packed (into the .git/packed-ref file) instead of being “loose”). In general, the lowest level command you should use to modify a ref is either git update-ref or git symbolic-ref. In this particular instance there is no need for mucking with Git internals or even using the previously mentioned Git “plumbing” commands; you can do it with git branch: git branch -f master origin/master. –  Chris Johnsen Nov 14 '10 at 8:13

Like outlined here, but even simpler, no resets involved, just create a new branch where master was, then painlessly delete master, checkout again the place which you want to move master to and create a new master branch there:

git stash
git checkout -b old_master_was_here
git branch -d master
git checkout origin/master
git checkout -b master
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Create a new branch new_branch at the current HEAD (assuming HEAD = master), reset master to C and switch to new_branch again (speaking in terms of SmartGit).

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