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How to take all but the last element in a sequence using LINQ?

Seems like a trivial task with LINQ (and probably it is), but I cannot figure out how to drop the last item of squence with LINQ. Using Take and passing the length of the sequence - 1 works fine of course. However, that approach seems quite inconvienient when chaining up multiple LINQ in a single line of code.

IEnumerable<T> someList ....

// this works fine
var result = someList.Take(someList.Count() - 1);


// but what if I'm chaining LINQ ?
var result = someList.Where(...).DropLast().Select(...)......;

// Will I have to break this up?
var temp = someList.Where(...);
var result = temp.Take(temp.Count() - 1).Select(...)........;

In Python, I could just do seq[0:-1]. I tried passing -1 to Take method, but it does not seem to do what I need.

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marked as duplicate by Matthew Jones, Frédéric Hamidi, Yacoder, Albin Sunnanbo, Jeff Yates Nov 12 '10 at 16:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 28 down vote accepted

You could write your own LINQ query operator (that is, an extension method on IEnumerable<T>), for example:

static IEnumerable<T> WithoutLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    using (var e = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (e.MoveNext())
        {
            for (var value = e.Current; e.MoveNext(); value = e.Current)
            {
                yield return value;
            }
        }
    }
}

Unlike other approaches such as xs.Take(xs.Count() - 1), the above will process a sequence only once.

share|improve this answer
    
Clever. 8 more to go. –  Erwin Mayer Mar 11 '14 at 9:32
    
@ErwinMayer: Three years later, and I still don't understand what you meant by your comment. :-D –  stakx Aug 6 '14 at 17:13
    
@staks Not too sure ;), maybe it was about the number of upvotes... –  Erwin Mayer Aug 7 '14 at 21:25
someList.Reverse().Skip(1).Reverse()
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2  
@LukeH, It's O(n) and it's one line answer as OP wants. –  Saeed Amiri Nov 12 '10 at 16:13
1  
Oh, why don't I think of this :) This is a clever and simple way doing what's available right out of the box. Not quite sure what the performance implication would be, but if I just need a quick and dirty way to get it done, this is a nice approach. –  Kei Nov 12 '10 at 16:15
1  
@Saeed: It is O(n) but it requires the equivalent of four passes through the sequence. The first example in Jamiec's answer is also a one-liner and O(n), but that only needs two passes through the sequence (or a single pass if the sequence implements ICollection<T> or ICollection.) –  LukeH Nov 12 '10 at 16:18
6  
Note that this also stores the entire sequence in memory - twice. If the sequence is extremely long then that could be a lot of memory. Yes, this technique is O(n) in time, but it is also O(n) in space, where it could be O(1) in space. –  Eric Lippert Nov 12 '10 at 16:35
1  
@Saeed: Why does an IEnumerable have to take O(n)? Enumerable.Range, for example, is O(1) in space no matter how many items are in the range. –  Eric Lippert Nov 13 '10 at 18:29

You can quite easily do this with an extension method, either using the form you've already found, or perhaps a combination of Except and Last

public static IEnumerable<T> DropLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
{
  return enumerable.Take(enumerable.Count()-1);
}

or, the second way:

public static IEnumerable<T> DropLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
{
  return enumerable.Except(new[]{enumerable.Last()});
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Does't second way fail to compile? Last() returns T, but Except takes IEnumerable<T>. Am I missing something? –  Kei Nov 12 '10 at 16:19
    
@Kei - probably right, I didnt test it, but something along those lines would work. Edited answer –  Jamiec Nov 12 '10 at 16:27
8  
The Except method is unsuitable for this because it also removes any duplicates from the source sequence. If the source is {1,2,3,4,5,4,3,2,1} then the OP would expect the results to be {1,2,3,4,5,4,3,2}; using your second example (assuming that you fixed the bug) would give {2,3,4,5}. –  LukeH Nov 12 '10 at 16:36
    
this also works: xs.TakeWhile((x, i) => i < xs.Count()-1) –  Rezo Megrelidze Jul 12 '14 at 19:07

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