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I'm using the JSLint tool to ensure my JavaScript is "strict".

I'm receiving the following error but don't understand how to fix it:

The body of a for in should be wrapped in an if statement to filter unwanted properties from the prototype

For the following code:

for (var i in keypairs) {
    ...
}

Anyone have any ideas how to fix this to that it's JavaScript "strict" and won't be flagged by JSLint

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5 Answers 5

If keypairs is an array, then you should really iterate of the elements like:

for(var i = 0; i < keypairs.length; i++) {
  ...
}

If keypairs is a hash, then JSLint is rightly recommenting that you check that you are operating on the appropriate key type (i.e., confirming that the hash is the expected type)

so something like

for(var i in keypairs) {
  if(keypairs.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
    ...
  }
}

where the if is validating whatever criteria ensures that you are not accessing a prototype function etc.

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1  
+1, just a note: better pattern for array iteration is for (var i = 0, l = keypairs.length; i < l; ++i) { ... }. This is slightly faster due to less lookup overhead for local variable (relative to length property). This is also what CoffeeScript would generate :-). –  Milan Gardian Feb 24 '12 at 21:26

It wants you to use hasOwnProperty.

for (var i in keypairs) {
    if(keypairs.hasOwnProperty(i))
    {
        // Use i
    }
}

Like much of JSLint, this is a recommendation, and its applicability depends on your situation. It is useful if there are undesired enumerable properties in the object's prototype. This might be the case if you e.g. use certain JavaScript libraries.

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The problem with for...in is that you will also traverse the properties of the prototype and most of the time this is not what you want. That is why you should test the property with hasOwnProperty:

for (var i in keypairs) {
    if(keypairs.hasOwnProperty(i) {
        //...
    }
}
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for (var i in keypairs) {
   if (keypairs.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
       ...
   }
}

This is because the for/in loop may iterate over some method extended by 3rd party library, e.g. if there is a

Object.prototype.clone = function() { ... }

then without the .hasOwnProperty() condition, the .clone method will be iterated in the ... as well.

This is further explained in http://yuiblog.com/blog/2006/09/26/for-in-intrigue/, linked from the JSLint page itself.

You can turn off this warning by checking "Tolerate unfiltered for in".

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take a look at jslint's own documentation: http://www.jslint.com/lint.html jump down to the section

for in

they do the following: for (name in object) { if (object.hasOwnProperty(name)) { .... } }

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