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How do we reverse a number with leading zeroes in number ? For ex: If input is 004, output should be 400.

I wrote below program but it works only when no leading zeroes in input.

int num;
cout<<"Enter number "<<endl;
cin>>num;

int rev = 0;
int reminder;
while(num != 0)
{
    reminder = num % 10;
    rev = rev * 10 + reminder;
    num = num / 10;
}
cout<<"Reverse = "<<rev<<endl;

Is there any way to input a number with leading zeroes ? Even then, Above logic doesn't work for such numbers.

Any simple solution ? It is doable by taking input as string and processing it. But that doesn't look nice.

*EDIT: If length of number is known, it looks to be possible to reverse a number with leading zeroes. (Without using string)*

I shall post the code as soon as it works.

EDIT 2: I tried to put back characters to cin stream and then read and calculate the reverse. It is working for 2 digit numbers.

But if length is known, its far easier to find reverse. All i need to do is, multiply by 10 for required number of times. So i think, i would go with string approach. Hoping that interviewer would be happy :)

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9  
If you want leading zeros in your input then you pretty much have to input it as a string. –  ChrisF Nov 12 '10 at 16:37
1  
Doesn't look nice?! Eh? :) That's by far the easiest method -- you don't even need to faff around with the actual number like you're doing above. The only concern with the string approach would seem to be checking that the input actually represents a number -- but that's not exactly hard. What's the problem exactly? –  Stuart Golodetz Nov 12 '10 at 16:39

10 Answers 10

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Leading zeroes are not represented by binary numbers (int, double, etc.) So you'll probably have to use std::string. Read the input into the string, then call std::reverse() passing the string as input.

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1  
Implementing std::reverse() was probably the real question. –  André Caron Nov 12 '10 at 16:46
    
Then the question (as an interview question) is vague. Either the correct solution is to use STL functions (showing you're not going to reinvent the wheel) or to roll your own (showing you know how a wheel is made), but the person being interviewed is not going to know which is expected. –  Jonathan Grynspan Nov 12 '10 at 17:46

Yes, you must use a string. You cannot store leading zeros in an int.

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No, he can also use other types than string. And to which question exactly are you answering "yes"? –  phresnel Jun 26 '12 at 12:53
    
To his assumption that he must use a string. Which type would you suggest? –  AndreKR Jun 26 '12 at 16:04
    
It always depends on the exact circumstances, but e.g. any sequential container could be made to work, e.g. std::deque<int>, std::list<char>, class Digit09 {...}; std::stack<Digit09>;. And I don't find the point where he assumes he must use a string. Possibly an edit I can't see? –  phresnel Jun 28 '12 at 8:52

Read the number in string format (that is, use std::string) and reverse the string.

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As ChrisF said, you need to load a string, because 4 and 004 is the same int and you cannot distinguish it after you assign it to an int variable.

The next thing to do is trim the string to contain just digits (if you want to be correct) and run std::reverse on it - and you're done.

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Beware of certain assumptions, is 008 and 8 the same number? –  D.Shawley Nov 12 '10 at 16:40
1  
@D.Shawley: we're not talking litterals here, but input of numbers using std::istream::operator>>. –  André Caron Nov 12 '10 at 16:45

Once you convert your input to an integer, which you do in line 3, any information about the leading zeroes in the input of the user is lost.

You'll have to use a string.

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If you know the total width you'd like the number to be before-hand, you can reuse the code you have and store the results (from right to left) in a zero initialized array. Note: you'd probably want to add some error checking to the code listed below.

int num, width;

cout<<"Enter number "<<endl;
cin>>num;

cout<<"Enter width: "<<endl;
cin>>width;

int rev[width];
for (int i = 0; i < width; ++i)
    rev[i] = 0;

int cnt = width - 1;
int rev = 0;
int reminder;
while(num != 0)
{
    reminder = num % 10;
//    rev = rev * 10 + reminder;
    rev[cnt] = remainder;
    --cnt;
    num = num / 10;
}

cout << "Reverse: ";
for (int i = 0; i < width; ++i)
    cout << rev[i];
cout << endl;

This will allow you to manipulate the number more easily in the future as well.

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int rev[width] = {0}; won't compile in c++03 –  bjskishore123 Nov 12 '10 at 17:15
    
Sorry, I should have checked - this should just initialize all elements of the array to 0. I've edited my answer to fix this. –  Nick Nov 12 '10 at 17:30
    
Its ok, Thank you for your efforts. –  bjskishore123 Nov 13 '10 at 4:49
    
But C++ doesn't have variable length arrays, so this code isn't valid. You could use a container instead. –  phresnel Jun 26 '12 at 12:55

Keep the number as a string, and use std::reverse.

std::string num;
std::cout << "Enter number " << std::endl;
std::cin >> num;

std::string rev(num);
std::reverse(rev.begin(), rev.end());

std::cout << "Reverse = " << rev << std::endl;
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Replace your while loop with a for loop with the same number of runs as you wish the original number has digits (including leading zeros). e.g. 004 would require the loop to be run 3 times, and not to terminate prematurely once x == 0.

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A recursive approach, but easily converted to a loop...

#include <iostream>

int f(int value = 1)
{
    char c;
    return (std::cin.get(c) && isdigit(c))
           ? (c - '0') * value + f(10 * value)
           : 0;
}


int main()
{
    std::cout << f() << '\n';
}
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s = int(raw_input(" enter the no of tyms :"))
n = 0
list, list1 = [], []

while n <= s:
    m = raw_input("enter the number:")
        n=n+1
        list.append(m)

print list
list.reverse()
print list

Reverse in one of the best lang Python.

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