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i cannot get my head around how to use interfaces and why they are needed. can someone please show me a simple example?

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8  
Plug "interface" into the search box. There are some excellent question/answer threads already on SO. For example: stackoverflow.com/questions/444245/… –  AJ. Nov 12 '10 at 16:59
2  
There are dozens of questions on interfaces, including a handful of "what are they and why/how to use them" question. Also, Google. (Edit: Now -1. I wouldn't necessarily downvote, but this question doesn't deserve upvotes either imo) –  delnan Nov 12 '10 at 16:59

10 Answers 10

up vote 14 down vote accepted
interface IFlyable
{
    void Fly();
}

class Bird : IFlyable
{
    public void Fly() { }
}

class Plane : IFlyable
{
    public void Fly() { }
}

List<IFlyable> things = GetBirdInstancesAndPlaneInstancesMixed();
foreach(IFlyable item in things)
{
   item.Fly();
}

Bird and Plane have no common base class except Object, but you can see using the same interface we can deal with them grouply in our program, because they have the same "feature": Fly.

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thanks so much this makes the most sense to me –  Yuck Nov 14 '10 at 14:05
public interface ISpeaks
{
    string Speak();
}

public class Dog : Mammal, ISpeaks
{
    public string Speak() { return "Woof!"; }
}

public class Person : Mammal, ISpeaks
{
    public string Speak() { return "Hi!"; } 
}

//Notice Telephone has a different abstract class
public class Telephone : Appliance, ISpeaks
{
   public Telephone(Person p)
   {
      Person = p;
   } 
   public Person { get; set; }
   public string Speak() { p.Speak(); } 
}


[Test]
public void Test_Objects_Can_Speak()
{
    List<ISpeaks> thingsThatCanSpeak = new List<ISpeaks>();
    //We can add anything that implements the interface to the list
    thingsThatCanSpeak.Add(new Dog());
    thingsThatCanSpeak.Add(new Person());
    thingsThatCanSpeak.Add(new Telephone(new Person()));

   foreach(var thing in thingsThatCanSpeak)
   {
       //We know at compile time that everything in the collection can speak
       Console.WriteLine(thing.Speak());
   }
}

This is useful because we can code against the interface rather than implementation and because we can use multiple interfaces on a single class, we are more flexible than if we used an Abstract class.

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Except your thingsThatCanSpeak.Add(new Telephone()); wont work because Telephone requires a Person in the constructor ;) –  Nate Nov 12 '10 at 17:10
    
+1 for showing the abstract bit, interfaces define something the inheriting classes should do, not what inheriting classes should be. –  Paul Hadfield Nov 12 '10 at 18:51
    
@Nate Thanks for that, added it later to illustrate the abstract class difference. –  Rob Stevenson-Leggett Nov 12 '10 at 18:55

I like this blog post that I read the other day: http://simpleprogrammer.com/2010/11/02/back-to-basics-what-is-an-interface/

Many people, myself included, have created interfaces that have a 1 to 1 mapping to the class they are representing but this is not always a good thing and that article explains why.

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1  
Great article! Thanks for posting that link. –  aaaa bbbb Nov 12 '10 at 17:08
    
@aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa then why didnt u mark it up>? –  Yuck Nov 12 '10 at 18:22
    
@girl: Because I can't up vote. I refuse to be a registered user. –  aaaa bbbb Nov 12 '10 at 22:08
    
@aaaaaaaaaaa are u afraid the government will track u? –  Yuck Nov 15 '10 at 20:14

Interfaces are somehow class definition alike, a sort of contract between the interface and the class implementing it.

An interface contains only the signatures of methods, properties, events or indexers. A class or struct that implements the interface must implement the members of the interface that are specified in the interface definition.

A .NET class cannot use multi-inheritance. As such, we rely on interfaces, and a class can implement as much interfaces as you wish. On the contrary, a class inheritance has to be single. For instance:

public class Customer : Person, Company {
}

This code is not allowed in any .NET languages that I know (C#/VB.NET).

To counter this lack, if we may say so, we rely on interfaces.

public interface IPerson {
    string Name
    string Address
    string StateProvince
    string ZipPostalCode
    string Country
    long PhoneNumber
}

public interface ICompany {
    string CreditTerm
    string BillingAddress
    string ShippingAddress
    string ContactName
    long ContactPhoneNumber
    long FaxNumber
}

public class Customer : IPerson, ICompany {
    // Properties implementations here.
}

In this way, interfaces are like a workaround somehow to multi-inheritance.

On the other hand, interfaces can be used as a contract for methods. Let's say you got a method that take an ICompany as an input parameter. You are now sure to have the properties defined in the ICompany interface to perform your work within the method.

public BillCompany(ICompany company) {
    // Bill company here...
}

Then, your Customer class correspond to what you are expecting, since it implements the ICompany interface.

Let's make another class, whose definition would only implement the IPerson interface.

public class Individual : IPerson {
    // Interface implementation here...
}

Then, your BillCompany() method could not accept an instance of the Individual class, as it doesn't show requirements (properties, etc.) for a company.

In short, interfaces are a good way to bind by contract your methods to what will be accepted, like inheritance.

There are indeed some precautions to take while working with Interfaces, a change to an interface will break your code, as an enforcing rule to implement the new member within all implementing classes, which class inheritance does not.

Does this help?

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An interface is useful when you have a given contract you want an object to fulfill but you don't really care about how they fulfill it. That's an implementation detail left to the class itself.

So let's say you have a method that's job is to process save requests. It does not perform the actual act of saving, it just processes the requests. As a result, it can take a List<ICanSave>, where ICanSave is an interface. The objects in that list can be any type that implements that interface. It can be a mix, or it can contain just one type. You're just concerned that it implements the interface.

public interface ICanSave
{
    void Save();
}

In your method, you might have something simple like

public void SaveItems(List<ICanSave> items)
{
    foreach (var item in items)
    {
        item.Save();
    }
}

How are those items being saved? You don't care! That, again, is an implementation detail for the class implementing the interface. You just want whatever class that enters the method to have that ability.

You could have a class that implements the interface that persists data to the file system. Another might save to a database. Another may call some external service. Etc. That's left for the author of the class to decide. You might even have a stubbed class for a unit test that does nothing at all.

That's just one use-case scenario, there are many others, several in the BCL. IEnumerable<T> is a good one, it is implemented by things such as ICollection<T> and IList<T>, which are in turn implemented by concrete types such as Array and List<T>. It's the interface which makes many of the programming constructs you may be accustomed to useful, such as LINQ. LINQ doesn't care about the actual implementation* of the class, it just wants to be able to enumerate it and perform the proper filtering and/or projection.

IDisposable is another good BCL example. You want to know that a class needs to clean up after itself. What specifically it needs to clean up is left up to the class, but by nature of it implementing IDisposable, you know it needs to clean up after itself, so you preferrably wrap its use in a using statement or you manually ensure that you call .Dispose once you've finished working with the object.

*LINQ actually does optimize for some interfaces.

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"I've got a bunch of classes here that I want to treat the same way, for a certain amount of functionality."

So, you write a contract.

Real-world example: I'm writing a wizard. It has a bunch of pages, some of which (but not all) are UserControls. They all need a common set of operations, so the controlling class can treat them all the same. So I have an IPage interface that they all implement, with operations like initializing the page, saving the user's choices, et cetera. In my controller, I simply have a List, and don't have to know what page does what; I simply call the interface's Save()s and Initialize()s.

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Simple example of interface Animal with two implementation of class animal (you have an unique description for animal and many implementation in class dog, cat...)

public interface IAnimal
{
   string GetDescription();
}

class Cat : IAnimal
{     
   public string GetDescription()
   {
      return "I'm a cat";
   }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
       Cat myCat = new Cat();

       Console.WriteLine(myCat.GetDescription());
    }
}
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Well from MSDN, "An interface defines a contract. A class or struct that implements an interface must adhere to its contract."

On this page, there are several examples of what an interface looks like, how a class inherits from an interface and a full blown example of how to implement an interface.

Hope this helps out some.

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Here is the main points of Interface,

1.We can call same method using different classes with different out put of same methods.

Simple Example:

 class Mango : abc
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("Hello Interfaces");
        Mango refDemo = new Mango();
        refDemo.mymethod();
        Orange refSample = new Orange();
        refSample.mymethod();

    }

    public void mymethod()
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("In Mango : mymethod");
    }
}

interface abc
{
    void mymethod();
}

class Orange : abc
{
    public void mymethod()
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("In Orange : mymethod");
    }
}

2.can call same method using same interface with different classes.

class Mango : abc
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("Hello Interfaces");
        abc refabc = new Mango();
        refabc.mymethod();
        abc refabd = new Orange();
        refabd.mymethod();
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    public void mymethod()
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("In Mango : mymethod");
    }
}

interface abc
{
    void mymethod();
}

class Orange : abc
{
    public void mymethod()
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("In Orange : mymethod");
    }
}
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