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I have a configuration where I need to store multiple Regex expressions in one string so I can split the string into an array of expressions that I can process individually. What would be a good delimiter I can use for the split that won't be too complex and at the same time not get confused with parts of the actual regex expression?

Thanks,

Mike

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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

you could take
the comments tag (?#COMMENTTEXT) with an magic word to break
or
you can insert a magic word something like BREAKHEREVOODOO
or
something that is unlikey to occur like two underscores (__)

edit:
or you could put the regexes in a xml string that contains a list of CDATA-elements :-)

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A common delimiter is / but it can be changed if you want to use it in the regex.

If you really have to use a delimiter (I think, for example a JSON array would be a better alternative) you could introduce an escaping scheme: If it stand alone it is a delimiter, if it's preceded by a certain character (for example ) it is part of the regex.

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You could use something that's unlikely to occur in a real regex, for example a string that can never match, and thus will most likely never be used:

$!^

for example looks safe.

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If I absolutely had to do this, I would either use hacktick's idea of using Regex-comments, or I would prepend the regexes with a header of counts.

Say I had 3 regexes, I would begin the data with 5;10;20;; which would tell the parser that after ;; a 5 characters long regex would follow, after that one 10 characters long and so forth. The actual details are debatable but I hope you understand my idea.

The final string would be something like 5;10;20;;barns[a-zA-Z_]*?^Bonobo Monkey Hope$

Technically they also pass as a regex, but your code would of course require the header no matter what.

It's not beautiful but it's the most robust idea I can come up with.

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