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Need a hand with some javascript and maybe its a friday thing, but im stuck...

I am making a custom jQuery carousel and im tring to make dynamic paging.

To simplify the issue (have added hard coded values), at the moment this code:

for(var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
 $('.paging').append('<a href="#" rel="0">Test</a>');
}

outputs:

<a href="#" rel="0">Test</a>
<a href="#" rel="0">Test</a>
<a href="#" rel="0">Test</a>

Whereas I need the code to output like:

<a href="#" rel="0">Test</a>
<a href="#" rel="200">Test</a>
<a href="#" rel="400">Test</a>

I can I adjust the for statement above so that it adds 200 everytime it loops through?

Any help would be much appreiated.

A.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do it more easily with the $(html, props) notation and .appendTo(), like this:

for(var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
  $('<a />', { href: '#', text: 'Test', rel: i*200 }).appendTo('.paging');    
}

You cant test it out here. If you're looping through a lot though, I'd advise caching the .paging selector, like this:

var p = $('.paging');
for(var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
  $('<a />', { href: '#', text: 'Test', rel: i*200 }).appendTo(p);    
}
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1  
+1 for the syntax.. I like the convention, but haven't gotten myself around to using it yet.. need some self-enforcing.. –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Nov 12 '10 at 18:29
    
Didn't know about that one ( $(html, props) ). It's sexy and I guess more readable the more properties of the element depends on variables. +1 to you! –  Simen Echholt Nov 12 '10 at 18:33
    
@Simen - also keep in mind for many scenarios it's much safer, for example the text is sanitized before being set, quotes get encoded so they won't screw up your HTML, etc...always prefer the DOM method of creating if at all possible :) –  Nick Craver Nov 12 '10 at 18:35
    
@Nick, the DOM is ok for small/medium appends. But not when things get heavy on the client side. If you use a JS templating engine you get the speed and a correct HTML. –  Mic Nov 12 '10 at 18:50
    
@Mic - It's fine for large appends as well, use a document fragment if needed in those cases. It's all about using it correctly :) –  Nick Craver Nov 12 '10 at 18:51

Try this:

var str = '';
for(var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
 str +='<a href="#" rel="' + i * 200 + '">Test</a>';
}

$('.paging').append(str)

Appending once should be better for performances.

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multiply the counter (i) by 200

for(var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
 $('.paging').append('<a href="#" rel="'+i*200+'">Test</a>');
}
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Try this:

for(var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
   var rel = i * 200;
   $('.paging').append('<a href="#" rel="' + rel + '">Test</a>');
}
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