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I have a requirement to replace all occurence of a lastname. However, the target strings contain ALL the letters of the lastname OR just a FEW characters of it. The target strings is never more than 30 characters long and is subdivided into 'sections' by character "/" (if this information will help)

For example, let's assume we have a last name = FLAHERTY that I am changing to PERRINS

I want to replace all strings for the name above in each string below, character for character. below is a before and after of the example.

MCDONN(3)/FLAH(3)CLAUSSEN expected -> MCDONN(3)/PERR(3)CLAUSSEN

MCDONN(3)/FLAHER(3)/CLAUS expected -> MCDONN(3)/PERRIN(3)/CLAUS

AB/BARAN/SHOOK(ATL)/FLAHERT(SM expected -> AB/BARAN/SHOOK(ATL)/PERRINS(SM

STELL/RUBIN/(STELL/CLAUS/FLAH) expected -> STELL/RUBIN/(STELL/CLAUS/PERR)

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Please tell in what environment you work. Text editor? Programming language? Which one? – Tomalak Nov 12 '10 at 19:52
1  
I don't think this is a job for Regex's, because you would need to generate a different Regex for each use case. You can't simply do something like (\w{3,10}) because it's going to match any word characters. You need to be more specific in that you're looking for a specific subset of characters. This might be more appropriate to tackle with code. – CodingGorilla Nov 12 '10 at 19:53
    
What is the minimum number of letters that must match in order for us to consider it a match? Is "Ab" considered to match "Abrahamson"? – LarsH Nov 12 '10 at 19:55

That would be one JavaScript-based solution:

var str  = "MCDONN(3)/FLAH(3)CLAUSSEN";
var find = /\bFLA(H(E(R(T(Y?)?)?)?)?)?\b/g; // assuming first 3 chars are req'd
var repl = "PERRINS";

var str2 = str.replace(find, function(match) {
  return repl.substr(0, match.length);
});
// -> "MCDONN(3)/PERR(3)CLAUSSEN"
share|improve this answer
    
The trouble with this approach is that it would also replace "FLARY". I don't think the OP wanted that. You could fix that by using /\bFL(A(H(E(R(T(Y?)?)?)?)?)?\b/g – LarsH Nov 12 '10 at 20:08
    
@LarsH: Right, that's true. I'll change the regex. Thanks! – Tomalak Nov 12 '10 at 20:12

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