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I was reading through the java.util.concurrent API, and found that

  • CountDownLatch: A synchronization aid that allows one or more threads to wait until a set of operations being performed in other threads completes.
  • CyclicBarrier: A synchronization aid that allows a set of threads to all wait for each other to reach a common barrier point.

To me both seems equal, but I am sure there is much more to it.

For example, in CoundownLatch, the countdown value could not be reset, that can happen in the case of CyclicBarrier.

Is there any other difference between the two?
What are the use cases where someone would want to reset the value of countdown?

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8 Answers

up vote 47 down vote accepted

One major difference is that CyclicBarrier takes an (optional) Runnable task which is run once the common barrier condition is met.

It also allows you to get the number of clients waiting at the barrier and the number required to trigger the barrier. Once triggered the barrier is reset and can be used again.

For simple use cases - services starting etc... a CountdownLatch is fine. A CyclicBarrier is useful for more complex co-ordination tasks. An example of such a thing would be parallel computation - where multiple subtasks are involved in the computation - kind of like MapReduce.

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"It also allows you to get the number of clients waiting at the barrier and the number required to trigger the barrier. Once triggered the barrier is reset and can be used again." I really like this point. A couple of articles I have read suggested that CyclicBarrier is cyclic because you invoke the reset() method. That is true, but what they don't often mention is that the barrier is reset automatically as soon as it is triggered. I will post some sample code to illustrate this. –  kevinze Apr 12 at 6:18
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I think that the JavaDoc has explained the differences explicitly. Most people know that CountDownLatch can not be reset, however, CyclicBarrier can. But this is not the only difference, or the CyclicBarrier could be renamed to ResetbleCountDownLatch. We should tell the differences from the perspective of their goals, which are described in JavaDoc

CountDownLatch: A synchronization aid that allows one or more threads to wait until a set of operations being performed in other threads completes.

CyclicBarrier: A synchronization aid that allows a set of threads to all wait for each other to reach a common barrier point.

In countDownLatch, there are one thread or some threads, they are waiting for a set of other threads to complete. In this situation, there are two types of threads, one type is waiting, another type is doing something, after finishes their tasks, they could be waiting or just terminated.

In CyclicBarrier, there are only one type of threads, they are waiting for each other, they are equal.

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This question has been adequately answered already, but I think I can value-add a little by posting some code.

To illustrate the behaviour of cyclic barrier, I have made some sample code. As soon as the barrier is tipped, it is automatically reset so that it can be used again (hence it is "cyclic"). When you run the program, observe that the print outs "Let's play" are triggered only after the barrier is tipped.

import java.util.concurrent.BrokenBarrierException;
import java.util.concurrent.CyclicBarrier;

public class CyclicBarrierCycles {

    static CyclicBarrier barrier;

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        barrier = new CyclicBarrier(3); 

        new Worker().start();
        Thread.sleep(1000);
        new Worker().start();
        Thread.sleep(1000);
        new Worker().start();
        Thread.sleep(1000);

        System.out.println("Barrier automatically resets.");

        new Worker().start();
        Thread.sleep(1000);
        new Worker().start();
        Thread.sleep(1000);
        new Worker().start();
    }

}


class Worker extends Thread {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        try {
            CyclicBarrierCycles.barrier.await();
            System.out.println("Let's play.");
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (BrokenBarrierException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
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One point that nobody has yet mentioned is that, in a CyclicBarrier, if a thread has a problem (timeout, interrupted...), all the others that have reached await() get an exception. See Javadoc:

The CyclicBarrier uses an all-or-none breakage model for failed synchronization attempts: If a thread leaves a barrier point prematurely because of interruption, failure, or timeout, all other threads waiting at that barrier point will also leave abnormally via BrokenBarrierException (or InterruptedException if they too were interrupted at about the same time).

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A CountDownLatch is used for one-time synchronization. While using a CountDownLatch, any thread is allowed to call countDown() as many times as they like. Threads which called await() are blocked until the count reaches zero because of calls to countDown() by other unblocked threads. The javadoc for CountDownLatch states:

The await methods block until the current count reaches zero due to invocations of the countDown() method, after which all waiting threads are released and any subsequent invocations of await return immediately. ...

Another typical usage would be to divide a problem into N parts, describe each part with a Runnable that executes that portion and counts down on the latch, and queue all the Runnables to an Executor. When all sub-parts are complete, the coordinating thread will be able to pass through await. (When threads must repeatedly count down in this way, instead use a CyclicBarrier.)

In contrast, the cyclic barrier is used for multiple sychronization points, e.g. if a set of threads are running a loop/phased computation and need to synchronize before starting the next iteration/phase. As per the javadoc for CyclicBarrier:

The barrier is called cyclic because it can be re-used after the waiting threads are released.

Unlike the CountDownLatch, each call to await() belongs to some phase and can cause the thread to block until all parties belonging to that phase have invoked await(). There is no explicit countDown() operation supported by the CyclicBarrier.

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In the case of CyclicBarrier, as soon as ALL child threads begins calling barrier.await(), the Runnable is executed in the Barrier. The barrier.await in each child thread will take different lengh of time to finish, and they all finish at the same time.

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There's another difference.

When using a CyclicBarrier, the assumption is that you specify the number of waiting threads that trigger the barrier. If you specify 5, you must have at least 5 threads to call await().

When using a CountDownLatch, you specify the number of calls to countDown() that will result in all waiting threads being released. This means that you can use a CountDownLatch with only a single thread.

"Why would you do that?", you may say. Imagine that you are using a mysterious API coded by someone else that performs callbacks. You want one of your threads to wait until a certain callback has been called a number of times. You have no idea which threads the callback will be called on. In this case, a CountDownLatch is perfect, whereas I can't think of any way to implement this using a CyclicBarrier (actually, I can, but it involves timeouts... yuck!).

I just wish that CountDownLatch could be reset!

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I think this is the answer that better show the theorical differences. The fact that latches can be broken by just calling multiple time a method while barriers need a precise ammount of threads to wait(). –  flagg19 Aug 12 '13 at 13:54
    
Right - that's the major difference: CountDownLatch-->NumberOfCalls, CyclicBarrier-->NumberOfThreads –  vibneiro Jan 29 at 13:22
    
Perfect explanation! –  Michael Z May 23 at 12:10
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The main difference is documented right in the Javadocs for CountdownLatch. Namely:

A CountDownLatch is initialized with a given count. The await methods block until the current count reaches zero due to invocations of the countDown() method, after which all waiting threads are released and any subsequent invocations of await return immediately. This is a one-shot phenomenon -- the count cannot be reset. If you need a version that resets the count, consider using a CyclicBarrier.

source 1.6 Javadoc

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If their difference is just can be reset or not, CyclicBarrier might be better named ResetableCountDownLatch, which is more meaningful due to the difference. –  James.Xu Nov 4 '11 at 7:31
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protected by om-nom-nom Jun 11 '13 at 12:23

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