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I'm trying to write a function that grabs a certain part of a file, sends that to another function, then continue to do the same thing from where the BufferedReader left off until the end of the file but can't seem to figure out how to make it work.

Here is what I have:

String str = "";
int count = 0; 

 try {
  while(//condition so it loops through the entire file. I've tried fileReader.ready() and fileReader.read != -1 but both just run into infinite loops){

   while ((count <  4)){ 
    str += fileReader.read();
    count++;
    fileReader.mark(1000);
   }

   fileReader.reset();

   DoSomething(str) // send str to another function and do something with it;
  }
  } catch (IOException e) {
   // TODO Auto-generated catch block
  }

Can someone help me with this and explain what I'm doing wrong? Much would be appreciated

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1  
You should explain what's not working, and what you expect to happen –  nos Nov 12 '10 at 20:51
    
Sorry. I should have been more clearer. The function is supposed to read through an entire file and take sequences of 4 characters and run it through another function. What I'm having trouble with is marking where my reader left off last and resetting it to grab the next 4 character sequence in the file. –  Joe Nov 12 '10 at 21:18
    
For example: "hi my name is joe" The first time around, it should grab: "hi m" and pass it through another function. the second time around, it should grab: "y na" and pass it through another function. This should continue until the end of the file is reached. –  Joe Nov 12 '10 at 21:18
    
Your question is very unclear. Maybe one example instead of two contradicting ones helps. –  Roland Illig Nov 15 '10 at 23:01
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8 Answers

If you know the number of characters, use the BufferedReader's .skip(long) method, which tells it to skip the first long characters (where long is a 64-bit whole number).

The call to skip will return a long with the number of characters actually skipped.

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The mark() method marks position in the file and you can specify how many bytes you want to read before calling reset(), which would reposition stream to the marked point. So, normally you need to call mark() at the beginning of your data and then call reset before next iteration.

   while (count <  4){
    if(count>0) {
      fileReader.reset();
    }
    fileReader.mark(1000);
    str += fileReader.read();
    count++;
   }
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The following works for me. Edited after comment.

import java.io.*;
public class Test {


public static void main(String[] args) {
String str = "";
int count = 0; 

try {
  Reader fileReader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("testfile"));
  fileReader.mark(5);
 while(fileReader.ready()){
   count = 0;
   str ="";
   fileReader.reset();
  while (count <  4 && fileReader.ready()){ 
    if (count == 1){
      fileReader.mark(5);
    }
   str += (char)fileReader.read() ;
   count++;
  }

  System.out.println(str); // send str to another function and do something with it;

 }
 } catch (IOException e) {
  // TODO Auto-generated catch block
 }

}

}

Note that you need to cast fileReader.read(); to a char or you'll get wrong output, you have to reset the count otherwise count<4 won't be true ever after the first run (and since you don't do fileReader.read(), you'll get in an infitite loop), and you have to test for ready on each read (or you might block)

EDIT: Obviously, this is an example. You should never do the straight str += something in a loop, but use a StringBuffer, and catch and handle the possible exception.

Note on the second edit: if this is an intensive procedure, this is doing it wrong. I'll see if I can do it right (without backtracking)

YET ANOTHER EDIT:

import java.io.*;

public class Test {


  public static void main(String[] args) {
    StringBuffer buffer = new StringBuffer();
    int length = 4;

    try {
      Reader fileReader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("teststring"));
      for (int i = 0; i < length && fileReader.ready(); i++) {
        buffer.append((char) fileReader.read());
      }

      while (fileReader.ready()) {
        System.out.println(buffer); // send str to another function and do
                                    // something with it;
        buffer.deleteCharAt(0);
        buffer.append((char) fileReader.read());

      }
      System.out.println(buffer); // send str to another function and do
                                 // something with it;
    }
    catch (IOException e) {
      // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    }

  }

}

The repeated call to the method that does something still isn't pretty, but this is a lot closer.

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I apologize, but I seemed to have made a mistake in my explanation above. This works, but instead of taking every 4 sequence in the. It should continue taking sequences of 4 from the next character in the previous run. For example: hi my name is joe first run: hi my second run: i my thrid run: my n –  Joe Nov 12 '10 at 21:45
    
fixed that, but this is rather ugly: reading every character 4 times, keeping resetting the stream –  Martijn Nov 12 '10 at 21:56
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I think you just need to reset count = 0 after DoSomething(Str). Right now you're never resetting your count variable and it's preventing you from entering the file read loop.

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Why mark and reset at all? Just read 4 bytes, process them, and repeat until EOF.

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Based on Martijns answer I made the code a little simpler.

package so4168937;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.Reader;
import java.io.StringReader;

public class SecondTry {

  static void consume(Reader rd, int length) throws IOException {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    int c;

    for (int i = 0; i < length - 1; i++) {
      if ((c = rd.read()) == -1)
        return;
      sb.append((char) c);
    }

    while ((c = rd.read()) != -1) {
      sb.append((char) c);
      System.out.println("<" + sb + ">");
      sb.deleteCharAt(0);
    }
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    consume(new StringReader("hi my name is joe"), 4);
  }

}

You don't need to use mark or reset, and using ready only adds complexity and unwanted behavior.

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i see that most of you prefer to use the FileReader, as the question asked for, but i just prefer to use the Scanner instead because i find it easier to use. so here is my example:

import java.util.Scanner;
import java.io.File;
    private void fileReader(){
        String str;
        try {
            input = new Scanner(new File("FILENAME"));
        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println("Scanner load failed.");
        }
        while(input.hasNext()){
            str+=input.next()+" ";
        }
        input.close();
        int j=0;
        for(int i=3;i<str.length();i++){
            DoSomething(str.substring(j,i));
            j++;
        }
    }

this reads each line and adds it to the string, and then it sends the string in bites of 4 to the DoSomething method.

i hope it helps.

Edit1: removed this edit.

Edit2:

did just read that you wanted in the comments.. and that can be done easily with any code actually i will change my code at the top to reflect this change.

hmm .. yeah.. that should work .. :)

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My idea is to define a CharConsumer that defines what it means to consume a bunch of characters. Then I wrote a method that takes an arbitrary Reader and reads it until the end. If you want another terminating condition, replace the while (true) with it.

If you need the input to the consume method to be buffered, be sure that you create exactly one BufferedReader and don't use the other reader anymore after that. Otherwise some characters may get lost while reading.

package so4168937;

import java.io.EOFException;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.Reader;
import java.io.StringReader;

public class Main {

  // unused, since the question was initially unclear
  public static void consumeFourInARow(Reader rd, CharConsumer consumer) throws IOException {
    char[] chars = new char[4];
    while (true) {
      for (int i = 0; i < chars.length; i++) {
        int c = rd.read();
        if (c == -1) {
          if (i == 0)
            return;
          throw new EOFException("Incomplete read after " + i + " characters.");
        }
        chars[i] = (char) c;
      }
      consumer.consume(chars);
    }
  }

  public static void consume(Reader rd, CharConsumer consumer) throws IOException {
    char[] chars = new char[4];
    int c;

    for (int i = 0; i < chars.length; i++) {
      if ((c = rd.read()) == -1) {
        return;
      }
      chars[i] = (char) c;
    }
    consumer.consume(chars);

    while ((c = rd.read()) != -1) {
      System.arraycopy(chars, 1, chars, 0, chars.length - 1);
      chars[chars.length - 1] = (char) c;
      consumer.consume(chars);
    }
  }

  interface CharConsumer {
    void consume(char[] chars);
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    consume(new StringReader("hi my name is joe..."), new CharConsumer() {
      @Override
      public void consume(char[] chars) {
        sb.append('<');
        sb.append(chars);
        sb.append('>');
      }
    });
    System.out.println(sb.toString());
  }

}

Update [2010-11-15]: Replaced the old code with code that implements a simple cyclic buffer, which is apparently what was wanted in the original question.

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This produces the output <hi m><y na><me i><s jo><e...>, the output he is looking for is <hi m><i my>< my ><my n><y na>< nam><name><ame ><me i><e is>< is ><is j><s jo>< joe> –  Martijn Nov 12 '10 at 23:30
    
That wasn't clear from the original question. Anyway I have added code that does what is called for in the modified question. –  Roland Illig Nov 15 '10 at 23:00
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