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I am losing on this implementation, could anyone please help me with explanation?

Thanks in advance.

A{}

C{public: begin(&a); private: A *a;}

begin(&a)
{
   a = &a;
}

B{private: A *a; C *c; start(); }

start(){
   c->begin(&a);
}

=> In B, the object A is created and in C the object A is referenced to the object a in B.

then I got this problem:

no matching function for call to: begin(a**), candidate: begin(&a)

Thanks in advance.

Otherwise, I can write this in C# and I am not sure how to implement this in C++:

public class A
{
   public A(){}
}

public class B
{
   A a;
   C c;
   public B()
   {
      c = new C();
   } 

   void start()
   {
       a = new A();
       c.begin(a);
   }
}

public class C
{
    A a;
    public C(){}

    public void begin(A a)
    {
      this.a = a;
    }
}
share|improve this question
15  
Please post real code, this is confusing. –  John Dibling Nov 12 '10 at 21:35
1  
I'm more than half tempted to remove the C++ tag. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 12 '10 at 21:36
    
The error message seems like an error message spit out by a C++ compiler. Obviously the syntax is way way off. –  Loki Astari Nov 12 '10 at 21:43
    
Hi, I thought it is clear: what I want is quite simple in Java or C# but this is the first time I am working in a C++ project and pointers give me really very headache. I have 3 classes A, B and C. The class C creates objects A and C. The class B has a declaration of class A and the object A in C is referenced to the object A in B. because the object A needs to be updated so in the class A i have method start to update the object A for the class B. I hope it is clear! thanks in advance –  olidev Nov 12 '10 at 22:18
    
Hi, I have updated my question by providing equivalent C# code. –  olidev Nov 12 '10 at 22:23
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Are you just trying to get the syntax correct?

class A
{};

class B
{
   std::auto_ptr<A> a;  // This object owns A so use a smart pointer to indicate ownership.
   C                c;

   B(B const&);           // Disable copying. If you want copying use boost::shared_ptr
   B& operator=(B const&);// Disable copying.

   public:   
     void start()
     {
       a.reset(new A());
       c.begin(a.get());
     }
};

class C
{
    A* a;
    public:
      C()
       : a(NULL)
      {}

    void begin(A* pA)
    {
      a = pA;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
I hope your example wasn't an attempt to fix it. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 12 '10 at 21:40
    
Just an attempt to decipher the above. The OP obviously understands the concepts of OO (at a basic level) but has no grasp of C++ syntax. –  Loki Astari Nov 12 '10 at 21:42
    
Hi, thanks for your reformatting. But I would like to pass the reference by calling the methods instead of constructing the class. –  olidev Nov 12 '10 at 22:14
    
Hi, I have updated my question by providing equivalent C# code. –  olidev Nov 12 '10 at 22:24
    
@JoesyXHN: Updated the C++ to match your C#. –  Loki Astari Nov 12 '10 at 22:32
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You are passing the address of a and receiving the object a by reference... that's not what you want. You want to pass the real object, but receive it by reference. If a is a pointer, then you're passing the address of the pointer (hence the **). Dereference it and pass the actual object

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but then I got this problem: error: expected ';' before ')' token :( –  olidev Nov 12 '10 at 22:10
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The compiler complains about the type of the object you pass to the function C::begin().

As far as I can see, you declare your function as a function taking a reference as parameter.

So, the call should be c->begin(*a) not c->begin(&a).

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it is not complaining about: expected ';' before ')' –  olidev Nov 12 '10 at 22:18
    
If there is a syntax error, you should post your whole code for us to be able to see that is the problem. –  Xavier V. Nov 12 '10 at 22:22
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You're misunderstanding the way C++ references work. If you want to pass a reference to a method, you don't need to do anything at the call site—there's no need to use the address of operator (&) like there is with a pointer. See, for example, this simple C++ program that uses references:

#include <iostream>

void test (int& a) {
    a = 7;
}

int main (int argc, char** argv) {
    int q;
    test (q);
    std::cout << q << std::endl;
}

The reference is passed without any special decorations. If you want to assign it to a pointer, you do need to use the address of operator to get a pointer from a reference, like so:

#include <iostream>

int* ptr;

void test (int& a) {
    a = 7;
    ptr = &a;
}

int main (int argc, char** argv) {
    int q;
    test (q);
    std::cout << q << std::endl;
    std::cout << *ptr << std::endl;
}

In your example, the definition of begin (&a) is correct, but its call site in start is incorrect, and should be written as c->begin (*a) (you can't pass a pointer to a method expecting a reference, so you need to dereference a first).

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, Thanks. It is clear but then I got this problem: error: expected ';' before ')' token :( –  olidev Nov 12 '10 at 22:10
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