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I just downloaded the MVC 3.0 RC and I'm excited to start using it, especially the Razor view engine. However, due to a few stick in the mud type people here, we are stuck using VB.NET instead of C#.

When I started trying it out, I noticed some quirks. If you are creating a Razor view using CSHTML, you can write code like this:

@foreach(string genreName in Model.Genres)
{
    <li>@genreName</li>
}

Razor will automatically detect that the <li> text is an HTML tag and will switch out of "code mode". With a VB.NET VBHTML file, this doesn't seem to be working. It's making me put the @: keyword in front of each line like this:

@For Each genreName As String In Model.Genres
    @:<li>@genreName</li>
Next

If I don't have it there, I get a runtime error. Also, the <text></text> tags don't seem to work.

Anybody know what's going on here or whether there's a workaround?

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Did you use <text> or @<text>? –  Gabe Nov 13 '10 at 4:15
4  
Also, have you seen this: asp.net/webmatrix/tutorials/asp-net-web-pages-visual-basic –  Gabe Nov 13 '10 at 4:30
    
I didn't try @<text>. Thanks for the link. –  Shea Daniels Nov 14 '10 at 22:21
    
You can use @<li>@genreName</li> without the : because your HTML tags are self closing, if they weren't then you would need to use @: but you do not, this is clarified in the link provided by Gabe. Also, @<text> will also work! I would hate for people to think they need to use @: all the time because they don't, if this were the case I'd be onto Andrew nurse about this hardcore :) –  Erx_VB.NExT.Coder Dec 1 '10 at 8:32
    
Yes, those all work, but my point was that in the C# templates you don't need the "@" character in front of the HTML elements. To me, this makes them considerably more elegant and easy to read. –  Shea Daniels Dec 1 '10 at 16:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I would say the reason it's required in Vb.net is vb allows xml elements inline whereas c# does not.

Dim xmlMarkup = <someElement>Values</span>

Because of this the natural parser for vb must behave differently than c# so you have to tell the parser to escape back to html by using the @. You can use @ and @:.

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5  
That would seem to explain it. It's understandable I guess, but it makes the VB templates a lot less elegant than the C# ones. Oh well. –  Shea Daniels Nov 14 '10 at 20:49
1  
@SheaDaniels Very true - and how many people use XML Literals? Nothing like ruining a new language feature to support an unused legacy one –  Basic Sep 3 '12 at 7:09
    
This is ridiculous... 2 years later and i'm still putting @: on every line of Html –  Scott Selby Dec 6 '12 at 18:22
    
I don't think it's going to change, @ScottSelby. The xml feature of vb won't disappear any time soon. –  BuildStarted Dec 6 '12 at 19:20

I just tried this in ASP.NET MVC 3 RC in a VBHTML view and it seems to work fine:

<ul>
@For Each i As Integer In Enumerable.Range(0, 5)
    @:<li>@i</li>
Next
</ul>

It renders this markup:

<ul>
    <li>0</li>
    <li>1</li>
    <li>2</li>
    <li>3</li>
    <li>4</li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
1  
I posted in my question that this works. The issue I have is that in the C# templates, the parses is smart enough to recognize the "<li>" tags without the "@:". This makes the C# templates considerably more elegant and readable, at least in my opinion. –  Shea Daniels Nov 14 '10 at 20:50
    
You can use @<li>@genreName</li> without the : because your HTML tags are self closing, if they weren't then you would need to use @: but you do not, this is clarified in the link provided by Gabe. Also, @<text> will also work! I would hate for people to think they need to use @: all the time because they don't, if this were the case I'd be onto Andrew nurse about this hardcore :) –  Erx_VB.NExT.Coder Dec 1 '10 at 8:35

As previously mentioned in comments, but not explicitly shown; prepending the text tag with @ solves the issue:

@For Each genreName As String In Model.Genres
    @<text>
        <li>@genreName</li>
    </text>
Next
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UPDATE:

You can use @li@genreName/li without the : because your HTML tags are self closing, if they weren't then you would need to use @: but you do not, this is clarified in the link provided by Gabe. Also, @<text> will also work! I would hate for people to think they need to use @: all the time because they don't, if this were the case I'd be onto Andrew nurse about this hardcore :) END UPDATE

Here is the basic syntax for vb razor,

The @ character starts inline expressions, single-statement blocks, and multi-statement blocks:

?
<!-- Single statement blocks  -->

@Code  Dim total = 7  End Code

@Code  Dim myMessage = "Hello World" End Code

 
<!-- Inline expressions -->
<p>The value of your account is: @total </p>

<p>The value of myMessage is: @myMessage</p>

        
     
<!-- Multi-statement block -->

@Code

    Dim greeting = "Welcome to our site!"

    Dim weekDay = DateTime.Now.DayOfWeek

    Dim greetingMessage = greeting & " Today is: " & weekDay.ToString()

End Code

<p>The greeting is: @greetingMessage</p>

So it should work, just close code mode at the end of the for each line and your back in HTML, this would avoid you using the @: - hunt to ellon, I think he is trying to not have to use @:

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Straight copy and paste from the above url linked int he comments without answering his question... –  MyNameIsJob Nov 13 '10 at 7:46
    
I answered his question at the end. I also copied pasted since the answer is there and nobody pointed this out to him, I also thought he didn't read the link since the link answers his question and everyone has ignored it so was important to point out. Plus I am answering the problem of him not wanting to do @: because it is nasty looking. Isjob: does this clarify your concerns with my post? –  Erx_VB.NExT.Coder Nov 13 '10 at 14:35
1  
Do you really have not much else to do than to criticize people just trying to help? I don't see you making any contributions to his questions. –  Erx_VB.NExT.Coder Nov 13 '10 at 14:36
1  
You just said that his code should work and posted examples that don't even include related html examples just the first few examples from the linked page. The examples have nothing to do with escaping back to html. That was the concerns I had with your answer. I don't make contributions when others appear to have answered the question sufficiently. In the end every answer said "it should work" rather than "why". Which one person attempted to do...if he's right, I don't know, but I'd like to know the answer too - your answer isn't it though. –  MyNameIsJob Nov 13 '10 at 17:17
    
I have showed him how he doesn't need to step out back into HTML if he uses @code and then End Code at the end, which is less messier than using @: - I still don't see why you think I haven't answered the question. After end code, your pretty much back in HTML mode! I don't think I could make that any clearer. –  Erx_VB.NExT.Coder Nov 17 '10 at 12:02

This doesn't use the same code as the OP but I was converting some C# code from an MVC book into VB.NET and got stuck with mixing inline HTML and VB code. This is the original C#:

@using (Html.BeginForm()) {
    @Html.ValidationSummary()
        <p>Your name: @Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.Name, new { @class = "form-control" }) </p>
        <p>Your email: @Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.Email, new { @class = "form-control" }) </p>
        <p>Your phone: @Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.Phone, new { @class = "form-control" }) </p>
        <p>Will you attend?
        @Html.DropDownListFor(x => x.WillAttend, new[] {
                new SelectListItem() {Text = "Yes, I'll be there",
                    Value = bool.TrueString},
                new SelectListItem() {Text = "No, I can't come",
                    Value = bool.FalseString}
            }, "Choose an option", new { @class = "form-control" })
        </p>
}

and these are the different ways of representing it in VB:

@Using Html.BeginForm()
    @:<p>Your name: @Html.TextBoxFor(Function(x) x.Name)</p>
    @:<p>Your email: @Html.TextBoxFor(Function(x) x.Email)</p>
    @:<p>Your phone: @Html.TextBoxFor(Function(x) x.Phone)</p>
    @:<p>Will you attend?
    @Html.DropDownListFor(Function(x) x.WillAttend, New SelectListItem() {New SelectListItem() With {.Text = "Yes", .Value = Boolean.TrueString}, New SelectListItem() With {.Text = "No", .Value = Boolean.FalseString}})
    @:</p>
End Using

@Using Html.BeginForm()
    @<text>
        <p>Your name: @Html.TextBoxFor(Function(x) x.Name)</p>
        <p>Your email: @Html.TextBoxFor(Function(x) x.Email)</p>
        <p>Your phone: @Html.TextBoxFor(Function(x) x.Phone)</p>
        <p>Will you attend?
        @Html.DropDownListFor(Function(x) x.WillAttend, New SelectListItem() {New SelectListItem() With {.Text = "Yes", .Value = Boolean.TrueString}, New SelectListItem() With {.Text = "No", .Value = Boolean.FalseString}})
        </p>
    </text>
End Using

@code
    Using Html.BeginForm()
        @:<p>Your name: @Html.TextBoxFor(Function(x) x.Name)</p>
        @:<p>Your email: @Html.TextBoxFor(Function(x) x.Email)</p>
        @:<p>Your phone: @Html.TextBoxFor(Function(x) x.Phone)</p>
        @:<p>Will you attend?
        @Html.DropDownListFor(Function(x) x.WillAttend, New SelectListItem() {New SelectListItem() With {.Text = "Yes", .Value = Boolean.TrueString}, New SelectListItem() With {.Text = "No", .Value = Boolean.FalseString}})
        @:</p>
    End Using
End Code

@code    
    Using Html.BeginForm()
        @<text>
            <p>Your name: @Html.TextBoxFor(Function(x) x.Name)</p>
            <p>Your email: @Html.TextBoxFor(Function(x) x.Email)</p>
            <p>Your phone: @Html.TextBoxFor(Function(x) x.Phone)</p>
            <p>Will you attend?
            @Html.DropDownListFor(Function(x) x.WillAttend, New SelectListItem() {New SelectListItem() With {.Text = "Yes", .Value = Boolean.TrueString}, New SelectListItem() With {.Text = "No", .Value = Boolean.FalseString}})
            </p>
        </text>
    End Using
End Code

What should be obvious from this is that when you need to include inline HTML within a code block you need to either prefix each line with a @: or enclose the HTML with an @<text></text> block. It's also obvious that this applies when you are using @Code ... End Code instead of starting a block of code with @.

p.s. Note that the @<text></text> tags are not output to the page so they won't interfere with anything

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