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Little Endian vs Big Endian

Big Endian = 0x31014950
Little Endian = 0x50490131

However Using this Method

inline unsigned int endian_swap(unsigned int& x)  
{
return ( ( (x & 0x000000FF) << 24 ) | 
         ( (x & 0x0000FF00) << 8  ) |
         ( (x & 0x00FF0000) >> 8  ) |
         ( (x & 0xFF000000) >> 24 ) );
}

result = 0x54110131
i spent lot of time trying lots of similar methods and even a library one like

unsigned long _byteswap_ulong(unsigned long value);  

But Still no luck .. all returns same result

EDIT
I'm Working on Little-Endian System with Microsoft Visual Studio 2008
the example as Follows

int main()
{
    unsigned int y = 0x31014950;
    unsigned int r = endian_swap( y );
    std::cout << r;
}  

the example posted on Ideone.com is correct .. but it doesn't work with me

EDIT

std::cout << std::hex << r;  

Either Ways Pals .. Hex or Not it's not getting the Right Number .. Either Visual Studio got a serious Error in it's Debugger or My Whole Machine ..
Because i Replaced the Whole Code with a More Slow Redunant code but still getting same results
BTW if it makes any difference .. i'm using Debugger to Break after the function to check the result

share|improve this question
    
You are using the return value, right? While you take x by reference, you never actually modify it. – James McNellis Nov 12 '10 at 22:00
2  
@VirusEcks: show your complete program, there's no point a bunch of people sitting around guessing what it is you've done wrong. – Steve Jessop Nov 12 '10 at 22:17
2  
So when you said, "I use the return", what did you mean? The function doesn't modify y. The value you print out is y. The output of this program surely is "822167888". If you print out r, you'll see the endian-reversed value. – Steve Jessop Nov 12 '10 at 22:29
1  
@Steve: and we need to cout << hex, otherwise we get decimal output – Vlad Nov 12 '10 at 22:36
1  
@VirusEcks: HELLO! YOU'RE PRINTING OUT y! Why would you think that your function, endian_swap, modifies y in any way? It doesn't. – Steve Jessop Nov 13 '10 at 0:44
  • Are you printing the result correctly?
  • Does the fact that you're passing in a reference instead of a value make a difference?
share|improve this answer
    
will removing the refrence make a difference ? because appearantly it doesn't :/ – VirusEcks Nov 12 '10 at 22:08
1  
Usually you pass in by reference if you want to change the passed-in parameter from within the function. You don't appear to be changing x at all from within your function, so passing in by value makes your intention clearer (and possibly correct). :) – John Nov 12 '10 at 22:11
    
OK, it's not the reference thing. Interesting problem! – John Nov 12 '10 at 22:19

Your code seems to be correct.

The following program (http://ideone.com/a5TBF):

#include <cstdio>

inline unsigned int endian_swap(unsigned const int& x)  
{
return ( ( (x & 0x000000FF) << 24 ) | 
         ( (x & 0x0000FF00) << 8  ) |
         ( (x & 0x00FF0000) >> 8  ) |
         ( (x & 0xFF000000) >> 24 ) );
}

int main()
{
    unsigned int x = 0x12345678;
    unsigned int y = endian_swap(x);
    printf("%x %x\n", x, y);
    return 0;
}

outputs:

12345678 78563412


Edit:
you need std::cout << std::hex << r, otherwise you are printing (1) wrong variable, and (2) in decimal :-)

See this example: http://ideone.com/EPFz8

share|improve this answer
    
indeeed .. it works with numbers like this .. but with this hex numbers it fails .. – VirusEcks Nov 12 '10 at 22:12
1  
It is a hex number. :) Hence 0x 12345678 – John Nov 12 '10 at 22:13
    
Made an example with exactly your number: ideone.com/Domrw – Vlad Nov 12 '10 at 22:14
    
unforunatly i'm working on Little-Endian System with visual Studio compiler – VirusEcks Nov 12 '10 at 22:16
1  
@Vlad: Tried on Visual Studio, output is exactly the same. – Benjamin Lindley Nov 12 '10 at 22:19

Eliminate the ampersand in front of the x in your argument specifier. You want to pass the value.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure of why this was downvoted. – John Nov 12 '10 at 22:11
    
@John: They didn't say, so impossible to know, but this doesn't even address the problem asked about. – Roger Pate Nov 13 '10 at 3:09
    
At one point it wasn't clear whether it applied or not, but I think we've figured out now that it didn't cause the problem. – John Nov 13 '10 at 3:52

Have you unit-tested your code?

On my platform, this passes:

void LittleEndianTest::testLittleEndian()
{
    unsigned int x = 0x31014950;
    unsigned int result = 
         (
             ( (x & 0x000000FF) << 24 ) + 
             ( (x & 0x0000FF00) << 8  ) +
             ( (x & 0x00FF0000) >> 8  ) +
             ( (x & 0xFF000000) >> 24 ) 
         );

    CPPUNIT_ASSERT_EQUAL((unsigned int)0x50490131, result); 
}
share|improve this answer

The example in your edit is outputting y not r. The input y is, of course, not modified.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. – mah Nov 14 '12 at 19:56

If I run the code you posted, it gives the correct result: endian_swap ( 0x31014950 ) == 0x50490131.

To get the result: endian_swap ( 0x31014950 ) == 0x54110131, your code must be equivalent to this:

#define __
inline unsigned int endian_swap(unsigned int& x)  
{                  //0x31014950  ->            0x54110131
    return  ( ( (x & 0x000000FF) << 24 ) |   //  50
        __    ( (x & 0x00F0F000) << 12 ) |   //   4
        __    ( (x & 0x00FF0000) << 4  ) |   //    1  
        __    ( (x & 0x00FF0000) << 0  ) |   //     1  
        __    ( (x & 0x00FF0000) >> 8  ) |   //      01
        __    ( (x & 0xFF000000) >> 24 ) );  //        31        
}

Check you haven't got similar differences in your code too.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm Interested .. how is it 12 .. and not a multiply of 8 ? – VirusEcks Nov 12 '10 at 23:36
1  
Why use the macro? – Roger Pate Nov 13 '10 at 3:08
    
@Roger I set the IDE to auto format code to 4 spaces indent, so use it if I want to format by hand. – Pete Kirkham Nov 13 '10 at 9:52
    
@VirusEcks one hex digit (nibble) is 4 bits, not 8. Assuming the code's using f as a mask so it deals in nibbles, the 4 moves 3 nibbles or 12 bits. – Pete Kirkham Nov 13 '10 at 9:55

Bit operators are not useful because they operates as if the bits are arranged in order from least significant bit to most significant bit regardless of the true internal byte order.

void isBigEndian()
{
    void *number;
    number = (int *) new int(0x01000010);
    // 0x01000010
    //   01 00 00 10                                      Hexadecimal
    //   0    1      0    0      0    0       1    0
    //   0000 0001   0000 0000   0000 0000    0001 0000   Bit
    //   1           0           0            16          Decimal
    char *byte;
    byte = (char *)number;
    cout << static_cast<int>(*byte);//prints 16: Little Endian
}

You change the number above and make it return 1 when it is BigEndian.

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