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I am trying to add NOT NULL and a DEFAULT to an existing table.

To do this, I am using a transitional table to populate any NULL values.

Table1 has the NULL column, Table2 has the improved design.

CREATE TABLE table1 (
    CustomerID INT
  , CartID NULL);

CREATE TABLE table2 (
    CustomerID INT
  , CartID NOT NULL DEFAULT NEWID());

INSERT INTO table2 (CustomerID, CartID)
SELECT CustomerID, CartID = CASE CartID WHEN NULL THEN NEWID() ELSE CartID END
FROM table1;

I still get the "Cannot insert the value NULL into column" error, even though I am populating every NULL value with a new value in the SELECT statement.

How can I make this work?

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A question i have had for a long time, maybe someone here can answer - Isn't NOT NULL redundant here as a DEFAULT value has already been specified for the column CartID ? –  Sadhir Nov 12 '10 at 23:01
    
@Sadhir - It is not redundant, because you could have a default value that is used for new records, but still allow NULL values in the column. –  willoller Nov 12 '10 at 23:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In SQL, NULL is not equal to NULL (and not unequal too).

"Does a dog have Buddha-nature or not?"
"NULL"

This is why CASE var WHEN NULL THEN … will never succeed.

Use this:

CASE WHEN CartID IS NULL THEN NEWID() ELSE CartID END

or just this:

COALESCE(CartID, NEWID())
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Wow, so bad syntax was the problem? Thanks!! –  willoller Nov 12 '10 at 22:48
1  
@willoller: syntax is good, it's ternary logic which was the problem. –  Quassnoi Nov 12 '10 at 22:48
1  
I prefer the ISNULL(CartID, NEWID()) syntax - seems clearer and more obvious what it does.... –  marc_s Nov 12 '10 at 22:48
    
Ahh yes because "WHEN NULL" = FALSE always –  willoller Nov 12 '10 at 22:49
1  
@willoller: no, NULL = FALSE is also not true (and even not false) :) –  Quassnoi Nov 12 '10 at 22:50

I vote for Qassnoi's answer, but instead of copying to a new table, I would usually:

  1. Alter table to allow null,
  2. Update table with new ids where null,
  3. Alter table again with not null restriction and default.

This would only work if noone else was using the table, so Quassnoi's answer is preferable.

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I would normally agree (using any other DB), but I can't seem to get SQL Server to cooperate - it errs out and says I have to drop and recreate the table. :( –  willoller Nov 12 '10 at 22:54

You can change the code to the following:

INSERT INTO table2 (CustomerID, CartID)
SELECT CustomerID, COALESCE(CartID, NEWID())
FROM table1;
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