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<table>
<tr>
<td>A</td>
<td>B</td>
</tr>
</table>

I think I can replace my td's with div tags, but not sure how.

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closed as not a real question by Svisstack, Andrew Barber, Klaus Byskov Pedersen, abelenky, Paul Sonier Nov 13 '10 at 0:38

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Could you be a bit more specific? What visual effect do you want to obtain? –  Alberto Martinez Nov 13 '10 at 0:07
1  
The question is: do you want to accomplish the same visual effect that you get with the default display of a table, or you just are discarding the table because you heard that tables are bad? Tables are bad when used only for styling (in that case you should use instead CSS) but are the right choice for displaying tabular data. –  Alberto Martinez Nov 13 '10 at 0:25
    
What Alberto said (though I think that using the word "instead" is among the things that cause the confusion that lead to this question in the first place). We can not literally and correctly answer your question, because there is no answer to it. But trying to extrapolate your intent is impossible from your question. Literally, what you posted might be fully appropriate to display in a table (though it lacks headers to describe the data it contains). But if what you want is do create a layout with CSS, it's a much more involved question, and we'd need specifics. –  Andrew Barber Nov 13 '10 at 0:38

3 Answers 3

There is no such thing as "translating from HTML to CSS". CSS is used within HTML/XHTML to style/arrange the contents.

If you are asking this question because someone told you "CSS is better than tables", I suggest looking for some much more broad information on CSS for layouts in general.

CSS and HTML are two complementary languages, each with their own specific purposes, which work together to produce web pages. Purists point out (very correctly) that HTML should contain 'semantic' code, and not layout code. CSS should be used to provide layout.

A big source of issues here is that historically, table tags were used for page layout - to create columns within a web page, for example. Therefore, purists like to complain about the use of table tags in HTML for page layout.

But many people take that way too far - incorrectly, in fact - and conclude that HTML table tags should not be used... at all. table tags exist for a reason and should always be used for that reason: to describe tabular data. Then, CSS should be used to style and determine the layout of that data. But some people (again: incorrectly) conclude that ALL tables are 'bad'.

This ignores the fact that CSS and HTML/tables are not at all contradictory or mutually exclusive. They should be used together. Use table tags to describe tabular data, and then use CSS to style that information for display.

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<style>div { display: table-cell }</style>
<div>A</div><div>B</div>

If that's not what you meant, please be more specific.

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I don't think that't a good idea. If you want it to have display:table-cell, then just use the TD element. –  Šime Vidas Nov 13 '10 at 0:11
    
I'm not going to down-vote, but IMO, this is a bad answer to this question. The main reason is this: There is still HTML there. Not really any less HTML than the original, in fact. Yes - the question was a bad one. But answering a bad question with a bad (and technically incorrect) answer is not helpful, IMO. –  Andrew Barber Nov 13 '10 at 0:18

Depends on specifics...

Could also do

<div style="float:left">A</div>
<div style="float:left">B</div>
<div style="clear:left"> <!-- . --> </div>
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I'm not going to down-vote, but IMO, this is a bad answer to this question. The main reason is this: There is still HTML there. Not really any less HTML than the original, in fact. Yes - the question was a bad one. But answering a bad question with a bad (and technically incorrect) answer is not helpful, IMO. –  Andrew Barber Nov 13 '10 at 0:18
    
Just trying to point out another way to lay out divs next to each other. It's a generic question. –  alxndr Nov 13 '10 at 0:20
    
I understand what you mean, and that's why I didn't down vote. The problem is, there is no generic (and correct) answer to the question. What you posted will behave differently than the table in numerous instances where there might be elements that are cleared elsewhere in the document, for example. It also provides no way to have a common border. Again, my point really is that the question was so bad and broad, that it's impossible to correctly answer it at all. –  Andrew Barber Nov 13 '10 at 0:32

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