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I have the following sql statement:

SELECT
 COUNT(table2.programName),
 table2.programName
FROM
 table1
LEFT JOIN
 table2
ON
 table1.programID = table2.programID
WHERE
 table1.MemberID = 12345
AND
 table2.programName = (table2.programName associated with dynamic table2.programID)

I do realize the last AND statement is currently invalid but it is what I cannot seem to get my head around. While I can execute the query successfully by inserting a known value, the query needs to be generated dynamically (done with php) and the value will appear as a variable. I only put in parenthesis to show what I am trying to accomplish.

Any ideas how would I go about finding the programName associated with the programID in the parenthesis in a single sql statement?

EDIT - POSSIBLE ANSWER

So in testing out some more, I think I may have found the answer but am unsure if it is 'good' practice. Here is my code:

SELECT
    COUNT(table2.programName),
    table2.programName
FROM
    table1
LEFT JOIN
    table2
ON
    table1.programID = table2.programID
WHERE
    table1.MemberID = 12345
AND
    table2.programName = (SELECT table2.programName FROM table2 WHERE table2.programID = $id);
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use:

   SELECT t2.programname,
          COUNT(t2.programname)
     FROM TABLE2 t2
LEFT JOIN TABLE1 t1 ON t1.programid = t2.programid
                   AND t1.memberid = 12345
    WHERE t2.programid = $id
 GROUP BY t2.programname
share|improve this answer
    
@OMG Ponies - your code works as does my edit above, is there really a preferred method? –  JM4 Nov 13 '10 at 1:24
    
@JM4: Your own query doesn't make sense. Using an aggregate function and selecting another column without group by will select a totally random program name. The WHERE clause will obviously make it so it selects the right one, but the query wouldn't be executed on most RDBMS. –  Vincent Savard Nov 13 '10 at 1:26
    
@JM4: There's no need for the subquery you posted - don't do more table scans than you have to. –  OMG Ponies Nov 13 '10 at 1:27
    
@Vincent Savard - my 2nd query works so I dont understand "how it doesnt make sense" –  JM4 Nov 13 '10 at 1:27
    
Forget about the WHERE part, remove it completely. What program name should MySQL return? The answer is : He doesn't know. There's no information about which program name is should select, and MySQL will take the first encountered. This query wouldn't be accepted by most RDBMS (Oracle, SQL Server, PostgreSQL, etc.). Now, with your WHERE clause, it obviously filters out any program name you don't want. Your query works, but because MySQL is too flexible. –  Vincent Savard Nov 13 '10 at 1:32

Assuming that table2 has a self-relationship, this is a possible solution:

SELECT
    COUNT(table2.programName),
    table2.programName
FROM
    table1
LEFT JOIN
    table2
ON
    table1.programID = table2.programID
LEFT JOIN 
    table2 as t2again
ON 
    t2again.mysteriousAssociationChild = table2.mysteriousAssociationFather 
WHERE
    table1.MemberID = 12345
AND
    table2.programName = t2again.programName

The trick is that SQL allows to have the same tables as many times as you want. In this illustrative case the self-relationship is represented by mysteriousAssociationChild and mysteriousAssociationFather, one these could also be programID (but that would spoil some of the mystery :).

Let me know if some thing is not clear.

share|improve this answer

What about checking it directly?

SELECT
    COUNT(table2.programName),
    table2.programName
FROM
    table1
LEFT JOIN
    table2
ON
    table1.programID = table2.programID
WHERE
    table1.MemberID = 12345
AND
    table2.programID = $id;
share|improve this answer
    
your code changes the end result and goal. I am not trying to match on programID, i am trying to match on programName. In my system, a programName can match to 300 programIDs. –  JM4 Nov 13 '10 at 1:19

This shows the count of all rows in table 1 with MemberID = 12345 that reference the program with ProgramID = $id.

SELECT
    COUNT(table2.programName),
    table2.programName
FROM table1
LEFT JOIN table2
    ON table1.programID = table2.programID
WHERE table1.MemberID = 12345 AND table2.ProgramID = $id
GROUP BY table2.programName
share|improve this answer
    
Not what I am looking for. I have used this previously. I am not trying to return the code for the tablename specifically, only that it does not match a set - OMG ponies has right answer below. –  JM4 Nov 13 '10 at 1:27
    
OK, yeah I forgot about $id before so I changed the query to include it, but now it looks like the one of OMG ponies. Ah well. I guess you're helped! –  littlegreen Nov 13 '10 at 1:31

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