Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following code loop does not leak memory (as verified by watching it loop infinitely under "top");

NSBitmapImageRep *this_bmap = 0;

while (1) {

  CGImageRef windowImage = 
     CGWindowListCreateImage(CGRectNull,
                             kCGWindowListOptionIncludingWindow,
                             windowID, kCGWindowImageDefault);

  this_bmap = [[NSBitmapImageRep alloc] initWithCGImage:windowImage];

  [this_bmap release];
  CGImageRelease(windowImage);
}

and I would not expect it to. However, when I copy a pointer to the bitmap data, like this:

NSBitmapImageRep *this_bmap = 0;

while (1) {

  CGImageRef windowImage = 
     CGWindowListCreateImage(CGRectNull,
                             kCGWindowListOptionIncludingWindow,
                             windowID, kCGWindowImageDefault);

  this_bmap = [[NSBitmapImageRep alloc] initWithCGImage:windowImage];

  void *pixels1 = [this_bmap bitmapData];

  [this_bmap release];
  CGImageRelease(windowImage);
}

this now leaks like crazy. I can see this happening rapidly under "top" and the program eventually grinds to a halt.

I am new to Objective-C, but I am not new to programming and I can't understand this behavior. The documentation for the method bitmapData claims it simply returns a pointer (as opposed to allocating something), so I am stumped. I found a similar question from some time ago, but the only answer was to "look into pools" and I don't see how that could help here.

Any ideas what's going on here?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Accessing the pixel data causes the object to be retained and autoreleased so that the bitmap data doesn't suddenly go away unexpectedly. To see your expected results (i.e., loop not consuming memory with each iteration), rewrite as:

NSBitmapImageRep *this_bmap = 0;

while (1) {
  NSAutoreleasePool* loopPool = [NSAutoreleasePool new];
  CGImageRef windowImage = 
     CGWindowListCreateImage(CGRectNull,
                             kCGWindowListOptionIncludingWindow,
                             windowID, kCGWindowImageDefault);

  this_bmap = [[NSBitmapImageRep alloc] initWithCGImage:windowImage];

  void *pixels1 = [this_bmap bitmapData];

  [this_bmap release];
  CGImageRelease(windowImage);
  [loopPool drain];
}
share|improve this answer
    
This worked. I don't understand it, so I have some homework to do. Thank you very much. –  rwa Nov 13 '10 at 4:30
    
Not really much homework to do. Autoreleased objects are put into a pool to be released when the pool is drained/released. This happens at the end of every event being processed in the run loop (i.e. once all your entire invocation stack has completed after receiving an event). If you have a tight loop like this, the pool will be filled quickly and won't be drained until the whole loop (and all invocations that follow it) has finished. Creating & draining a new autorelease pool for each iteration of the loop means the pool never grows so large. –  d11wtq Nov 13 '10 at 6:02

hmmm, I'm no guru so I'm just guessing here. But it occurs to me that every time through to loop you are effectively declaring a new variable called pixels1. Therefore each time through you allocate some new space rather than reuse it. Try moving the declaration of pixels1 outside the loop and see what happens.

Note, this is just a guess and may be wrong. A more knowledgable person may be able to give you a definitive answer.

share|improve this answer
1  
looks like I'm wrong :-) –  drekka Nov 13 '10 at 4:08

The "initWithCGImage:" call has this in its documentation:

Discussion

If you use this method, you should treat the resulting bitmap NSBitmapImageRep object as read only. Because it only retains the value in the cgImage parameter, rather than unpacking the data, accessing the pixel data requires the creation of a copy of that data in memory. Changes to that data are not saved back to the Core Graphics image.

That seems to indicate that the memory returned from bitmapData needs to be CFRelease'ed.

share|improve this answer
1  
No, because the pointer returned from bitmapData is not to a CF object. Trying to CFRelease it will cause a crash. –  Peter Hosey Nov 13 '10 at 6:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.