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This code is currently working, but it looks terrible - and probably can be much improved in terms of performance.

Any Suggestions?

def OnClick():
    global Selection, touch, set_elsb, set_vreg, set_els, BAR_Items
    A = viz.pick(0, viz.WORLD, all=False)
    if touch != A: return
    for i in BAR_Items:
        if not set_els: break
        elif BAR_Items[i] == A or SHAPES[i+"_SHP"] == A:
            if i in Selection:
                Selection.remove(i)
                BAR_Items[i].clearActions()
                VFrame.SetStatusText(frame, i + " has been deselected")
                viz.director( do_chart )
            else:
                Selection.append(i)

Thank you very much!

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What is the goal of the code? –  GWW Nov 13 '10 at 3:35
1  
All I can see is a for with a an if and a nested if. Nothing outrageous performance wise, believe me I've seen worst. –  Ben Nov 13 '10 at 3:37
3  
@relima Are you showing us the whole function? if so, why not just handle checking set_els in the same way you handle touch != A? This would save doing that check on every iteration of the loop. –  aaronasterling Nov 13 '10 at 3:47
1  
so many globals. Is it necessary? –  Tauquir Nov 13 '10 at 3:56
2  
One common thing for performance is to remove dots, like "remveselection = Selection.remove" before the loop and then "removeselection(i)" in the loop. Also, is Selection something fast, like a set? You are doing membership checking frequently... Definitely remove the globals, possibly by making it a function. –  Sean Reifschneider Nov 13 '10 at 5:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's a few more lines of code but I think it's clearer.

def OnClick():
     if not set_els: return

     # swap this with the line above if viz.pick has side effects that should occur 
     A = viz.pick(0, viz.WORLD, all=False) 
     if touch != A: return


     keys = (key for key in BAR_Items
             if BAR_Items[key] == A or SHAPES[key+"_SHP"] == A)

     for key in keys:
         if key in Selection:
             Selection.remove(key)
             BAR_Items[key].clearActions()
             VFrame.SetStatusText(frame, key + " has been deselected")
             viz.director(do_chart)
         else:
             Selection.append(key)

That entire global statement served no purpose as you weren't assigning to any of them. Calling attributes and setting keys don't require the global keyword.

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1  
keys = (key for key in BAR_Items if A in (BAR_Items[key], SHAPES[key+"_SHP"]) –  hughdbrown Nov 13 '10 at 4:20
1  
@hughdbrown, with constants, definitely. I'm not sure if the cost of constructing tuples from non-constants is offset by the gain of being able to use in and I think that both idioms are perfectly readable. –  aaronasterling Nov 13 '10 at 4:26

It is very common to assume that if code is ugly, confusing, or hard to follow, it must therefore be inefficient.

Many people also think that if you want to make code go faster, you have to uglify it.

I've seen way ugly confusing code, some of which ran very fast, and other of which had massive performance problems.

I've also seen clean, clear, beautiful code of which the same could be said.

My experience - speed and beauty are independent.

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If set_els is not changed outside during this code execution then:

def OnClick():
    global Selection, touch, set_elsb, set_vreg, set_els, BAR_Items
    if set_els: return
    A = viz.pick(0, viz.WORLD, all=False)
    if touch != A: return
    for i in BAR_Items:
        if not (BAR_Items[i] == A or SHAPES[i+"_SHP"] == A): continue
        if i in Selection:
            Selection.remove(i)
            BAR_Items[i].clearActions()
            VFrame.SetStatusText(frame, i + " has been deselected")
            viz.director( do_chart )
        else:
            Selection.append(i)

Anyway, my bad code detector flashes with red light when it sees such a code, especially with such amount of globals.

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My normal approach to this would be to re-factor some of it out into small methods. This generally makes it more testable and easier to read.

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