Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have included my source code draft below. I would appreciate any input on what I'm doing incorrectly. I'm not sure my syntax is correct... Also, I did find an example on Cramster; but I'm not sure that the example implemented the "subscript" as directed (please point it out if I am wrong in this) by the instructions. I also think that the "for" loop is rather repetitive since it appears that it's establishing the same thing that the subscript is supposed to establish... This code is in response to the following assignment:

"Write a program in which you declare an array of five integers and store five values in the array. Write a try block in which you place a loop that attempts to access each element of the array, incrementing a subscript from 0 to 10. Create a catch block that catches the eventual IndexOutOfRangeException; within the block, display “Now you’ve gone too far.” on the screen. Save the file as GoTooFar.cs."

Microsoft® Visual C#® 2008, An Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming, 3e, Joyce Farrell

My source code with errors:

using System;

namespace Further

{
   public class GoTooFar
   {
      public static void Main()
      {
         private static int[] fiveIntArray = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
         //private static int CUTOFF = 11;    

         int subscript;
         int rate;


         try
         {
            //bool further;
            //public static int DetermineArray(int further)
            for(int x = 0; x < 10; x++)
            if(further < 11)
               throw new IndexOutofRangeException("Now you've gone too far.");
               subscript = 0;
            else
               subscript = 10;
            rate = fiveIntArray[subscript];
            return rate;
         }

         catch(IndexOutOfRangeException e)
         {
            throw;
            Console.WriteLine(e.StackTrace);
            //Console.WriteLine("Now you've gone too far.");
            //return e;
         }
      }
   }   
}                                       

//The example I found on Cramster.com:

using System;
namespace Console2
{   
   class Class1
   {
      static void Main(string[] args)
      {
         int[] numbers = new int[5] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};

         try
         {
            for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
            if(i>5)
               throw new IndexOutOfRangeException("Now you’ve gone too far.");
         }

         catch(IndexOutOfRangeException e)
         {
            throw;
         }

      }//end ma...
   }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're not supposed to throw an exception, just catch the one the runtime throws. There are several other issues:

  1. You are declaring a field inside a method. Just drop the private static.
  2. Only the if/else was in the for loop, but you clearly intend the access to be too. I prefer to always use curly braces, but that's subjective.
  3. You apparently intend to return every iteration, which doesn't make sense.

It can be as simple as:

public static void Main()
{
    int[] fiveIntArray = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    try
    {
        for(int x = 0; x < 10; x++)
        {
            int rate = fiveIntArray[x];
        }
    }
    catch(IndexOutOfRangeException e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Now you've gone too far.");
    }       
}

Note, we don't actually use rate. It's just there so it will be a valid statement.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for your help. I really appreciated you taking the time to point out the terrible flaws in my code (as opposed to just showing me how it should be done). Because you took the time to do this, I have learned a great deal more from your comment. I have to say this kind of constructive criticism is much more helpful to me in learning how to program than simply seeing a specific source code that actually works because it's showing me the major mistakes I made. That said, I do like your source code better than the one on cramster. Less is more... :-) –  Nooob Nov 13 '10 at 17:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.