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I am using the build in JSON class in Scala 2.8 to parse JSON code. I don't want to use the Liftweb one or any other due to minimizing dependencies.

The way I am doing it seems too imperative, is there a better way to do it?

import scala.util.parsing.json._
...
val json:Option[Any] = JSON.parseFull(jsonString)
val map:Map[String,Any] = json.get.asInstanceOf[Map[String, Any]]
val languages:List[Any] = map.get("languages").get.asInstanceOf[List[Any]]
languages.foreach( langMap => {
val language:Map[String,Any] = langMap.asInstanceOf[Map[String,Any]]
val name:String = language.get("name").get.asInstanceOf[String]
val isActive:Boolean = language.get("is_active").get.asInstanceOf[Boolean]
val completeness:Double = language.get("completeness").get.asInstanceOf[Double]
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 62 down vote accepted
+50

This is a solution based on extractors which will do the class cast:

class CC[T] { def unapply(a:Any):Option[T] = Some(a.asInstanceOf[T]) }

object M extends CC[Map[String, Any]]
object L extends CC[List[Any]]
object S extends CC[String]
object D extends CC[Double]
object B extends CC[Boolean]

for {
    Some(M(map)) <- List(JSON.parseFull(jsonString))
    L(languages) = map("languages")
    M(language) <- languages
    S(name) = language("name")
    B(active) = language("is_active")
    D(completeness) = language("completeness")
} yield {
    (name, active, completeness)
}

At the start of the for loop I artificially wrap the result in a list so that it yields a list at the end. Then in the rest of the for loop I use the fact that generators (using <-) and value definitions (using =) will make use of the unapply methods.

(Older answer edited away - check edit history if you're curious)

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I like your edit 2 approach of declaring objects with the expected types and an unapply method. If you post it as a separate answer, I'll vote it up. –  Steve Nov 16 '10 at 19:42
    
Sorry to dig up an old post, but what's the meaning for the first Some(M(map)) in the loop? I understand the M(map) is extracting the map to the variable "map", but what about the Some? –  Federico Bonelli Jul 17 at 8:30
    
@FedericoBonelli, JSON.parseFull returns Option[Any], so it starts with List(None) or List(Some(any)). The Some is for pattern matching on Option. –  huynhjl Jul 17 at 13:12

I tried a few things, favouring pattern matching as a way of avoiding casting but ran into trouble with type erasure on the collection types.

The main problem seems to be that the complete type of the parse result mirrors the structure of the JSON data and is either cumbersome or impossible to fully state. I guess that is why Any is used to truncate the type definitions. Using Any leads to the need for casting.

I've hacked something below which is concise but is extremely specific to the JSON data implied by the code in the question. Something more general would be more satisfactory but I'm not sure if it would be very elegant.

implicit def any2string(a: Any)  = a.toString
implicit def any2boolean(a: Any) = a.asInstanceOf[Boolean]
implicit def any2double(a: Any)  = a.asInstanceOf[Double]

case class Language(name: String, isActive: Boolean, completeness: Double)

val languages = JSON.parseFull(jstr) match {
  case Some(x) => {
    val m = x.asInstanceOf[Map[String, List[Map[String, Any]]]]

    m("languages") map {l => Language(l("name"), l("isActive"), l("completeness"))}
  }
  case None => Nil
}

languages foreach {println}
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I like the user of implicit's to extract it. –  Phil Nov 22 '10 at 1:02

I like @huynhjl's answer, it led me down the right path. However, it isn't great at handling error conditions. If the desired node does not exist, you get a cast exception. I've adapted this slightly to make use of Option to better handle this.

class CC[T] {
  def unapply(a:Option[Any]):Option[T] = if (a.isEmpty) {
    None
  } else {
    Some(a.get.asInstanceOf[T])
  }
}

object M extends CC[Map[String, Any]]
object L extends CC[List[Any]]
object S extends CC[String]
object D extends CC[Double]
object B extends CC[Boolean]

for {
  M(map) <- List(JSON.parseFull(jsonString))
  L(languages) = map.get("languages")
  language <- languages
  M(lang) = Some(language)
  S(name) = lang.get("name")
  B(active) = lang.get("is_active")
  D(completeness) = lang.get("completeness")
} yield {
  (name, active, completeness)
}

Of course, this doesn't handle errors so much as avoid them. This will yield an empty list if any of the json nodes are missing. You can use a match to check for the presence of a node before acting...

for {
  M(map) <- Some(JSON.parseFull(jsonString))
} yield {
  map.get("languages") match {
    case L(languages) => {
      for {
        language <- languages
        M(lang) = Some(language)
        S(name) = lang.get("name")
        B(active) = lang.get("is_active")
        D(completeness) = lang.get("completeness")
      } yield {
        (name, active, completeness)
      }        
    }
    case None => "bad json"
  }
}
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This is the way I do the pattern match:

val result = JSON.parseFull(jsonStr)
result match {
  // Matches if jsonStr is valid JSON and represents a Map of Strings to Any
  case Some(map: Map[String, Any]) => println(map)
  case None => println("Parsing failed")
  case other => println("Unknown data structure: " + other)
}
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