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I rarely use inheritance, but when I do I sometimes encounter the following problem. Given:

  • I want to inject an object in the parent class constructor, say a Logger.
  • Given both the parent and the subclass need to use this field.
  • Given I don't want to expose the field to the outside world (no getter).

I have seen this tackled in two different ways:

class ChildClass extends ParentClass {
  private Logger logger;
  public ChildClass(Logger logger) {
    super(logger);
    this.logger = logger;
  }
}

class ParentClass {
  private Logger logger;
  public ParentClass(Logger logger) {
    this.logger = logger;
  }
}

Or:

class ChildClass extends ParentClasss {
  public ChildClass(Logger logger) {
    super(logger);
  }
}

class ParentClass {
  protected Logger logger;
  public ParentClass(Logger logger) {
    this.logger = logger;
  }
}

I guess another option would be a protected getter in ParentClass but I have never encountered this.

Personally, I prefer the second approach with the rationale that smaller data size trumps encapsulation, but I have often encountered the first version in the wild. Is there a stricly preferable way to do this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't think there's a strictly preferable way, but in general, if you know the logger may be needed by subclasses - as you do in this case - then you should make it accessible, either by making the field protected or by adding a protected getter. Some people would say adding the getter is preferable.

One reason you see duplicated fields "in the wild" is because the subclass was written second, and modifying the parent class is not always possible.

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Thanks for your answer, that confirms my intuition. Here's another one for you: say both fields are final. In the first case, do you think the compiler would be clever enough to figure out the pointers will always be the same and collapse them into the same field? –  Philippe Beaudoin Nov 13 '10 at 6:32
    
See my updated answer. –  Stephen C Nov 13 '10 at 7:02

The second option is better from a design and performance perspective, assuming that the logger is needed in the parent class. Having two attributes containing the same value is potentially confusing, and uses more space. (The latter is only significant if large numbers of instances are created.)

However:

  • I'd declare it as private in the parent class, and provide a protected final getter method.
  • If you do declare it as protected attribute of the parent class, you should alsop make it final.
  • If you are using one of the standard logging APIs, it is normal practice to have the object instantiate its own logger; e.g. with Log4j

      this.logger = Logger.getLogger(this.getClass());
    

These are all relatively minor issues, but (IIRC) the default PMD ruleset includes a rule that whinges about protected attributes.

... but I have often encountered the first version in the wild.

Yea well, lots of code in the wild is less than perfect, and as I opined, these are relatively minor issues.

FOLLOWUP

say both fields are final. In the first case, do you think the compiler would be clever enough to figure out the pointers will always be the same and collapse them into the same field?

No. I don't think that the compiler would do that:

  • Any optimization has to work in the face of reflective access (and even update) of the attributes. In this case, the reflection code would need to know about the optimization and map requests for one version of the field to the other.

  • In most cases the payoff for such an optimization would small, and the CPU cost of the JIT compiler figuring out that the optimization is valid would be significant.

(Bear in mind that this optimization can only be performed by the JIT compiler. The bytecode compiler doesn't have enough information to do the optimization. Specifically, it doesn't know what the final code of the class constructors is. Also bear in mind that unless there are large numbers of instances of the objects in question, the space saving would be insignificant.)

However, I've been using Guice for a while ant it looks like a standard practice to inject the logger instead of relying on a static factory.

I think that is a Guice-specific idiom / practice. Plain Java applications / libraries rarely pass loggers as arguments in my experience.

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I agree, private field with a protected final getter method is also the way I would do it. –  Nico Huysamen Nov 13 '10 at 6:20
    
Logger was just an example. However, I've been using Guice for a while ant it looks like a standard practice to inject the logger instead of relying on a static factory. –  Philippe Beaudoin Nov 13 '10 at 6:30
    
Why the down vote? –  Stephen C Nov 13 '10 at 7:23
    
+1 for protected final, In my opinion that combination of access modifiers should be used way more often instead of plain protected. –  Jörn Horstmann Nov 13 '10 at 9:40

If you absolutely do not want to expose the field to the outside world, you would need to make it private, as even a protected field is visible to members of it's package (as well as any subclass). However, that might be overkill in the case of a Logger. Inheritance might be an easier to understand/maintain implementation.

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I would also use the second approach.

I'm not certain why you're so concerned about memory footprint, but the difference betweent the two approaches is negligible. Technically, you are not storing logger twice. In Java, all object variables are pointers. So in the first scenario, both ParentClass and ChildClass are pointing to the same logger instance.

The second approach is a classic example of one of the advantages of having inheritance, that is sharing functionality and properties.

To be honest, this is a design decision that is completely up to you, neither have a real significant impact on memory footprint, but the second approach utilizes the principles of OOP more than the first.

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1  
Ummm ... pointers take space too. –  Stephen C Nov 13 '10 at 6:23
    
Are you seriously concerned over a few bytes? My point is that it is negligible, but I should have prefaced that by saying, "in most situations." If the target platform has limited memory, such as embedded systems, then I can understand the concern. Otherwise, it is worry for no just reason. –  John Nov 13 '10 at 6:29
    
If logger is the the only field in the class, storing it twice has a very real impact on its relative size. The problem can be even worse if you have deeper hierarchies, or many fields that you duplicate in this fashion. Sure, for one isolated instance it's no big deal, but imagine you have a huge array of these classes... –  Philippe Beaudoin Nov 13 '10 at 6:35
    
@John - if you have a few million of these objects those "few bytes" could add up to a lot of memory. Not to mention more work for the garbage collector. –  Stephen C Nov 13 '10 at 6:43
    
Perhaps discarding such outlandish scenarios would aid in making these design decisions. In any case, I wasn't aware you were looking for an answer specific to handling large datasets as much as you were on good programming practices. So let's not take my answer out of context and apply it to the problems of the world. Yes, all of these scenarios could happen. Anything you dream of could happen. However, the operative word is could. So unless it is a requirement to perform under these conditions, which isn't stated at all in the question, then I still say its worry for no reason. =) –  John Nov 13 '10 at 6:54

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