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List<Object> testimonials = new List<Object>();
testimonials.Add(new {
    Author = "Author 1",
    Testimonial = "Testimonial 1"
});
testimonials.Add(new {
    Author = "Author 2",
    Testimonial = "Testimonial 2"
});
testimonials.Add(new {
    Author = "Author 3",
    Testimonial = "Testimonial 3"
});

@ObjectInfo.Print(testimonials[DateTime.Now.DayOfYear % testimonials.Count].Author)

Gives me an error CS1061: 'object' does not contain a definition for 'Author'

How do I get only the Author or Testimonial from the list of testimonials?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A lazy way would be to switch "object" for "dynamic". Or use A Tuple generic type.

But IMO you should simply write a class with hear two properties:

public class Testimonial {
    public string Author {get;set;}
    public string Comment {get;set;}
}

And use a List-of-Testimonial.

Another way would be to use something like:

var arr = new[]{new{...},new{...}};

This is an array of your anon-type, and;

string author = arr[0].Author;

Would work fine.

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1  
+1 Anonymous types are very useful, but in this scenario you should define a strict type. –  Matthew Abbott Nov 13 '10 at 11:58
var testimonials = CreateList(new { 
    Author = "Author 1", 
    Testimonial = "Testimonial 1" 
}); 
testimonials.Add(new { 
    Author = "Author 2", 
    Testimonial = "Testimonial 2" 
}); 
testimonials.Add(new { 
    Author = "Author 3", 
    Testimonial = "Testimonial 3" 
}); 

List<T> CreateList<T>(T firstItem)
{
  List<T> result = new List<T>();
  result.Add(firstItem);
  return result;
} 

Should do it but I believe you should follow Marc's suggestion of strongly typing the entity

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You forgot the <T> in the generic method definition ;-) –  digEmAll Nov 13 '10 at 12:08
    
Well spotted, thanks (I don't have a C# compiler available so I was not able to test the code). –  vc 74 Nov 13 '10 at 16:56

Use implicitly-typed array:

var arr = new[]
{
    new { Author = "Author 1", Testimonial = "Testimonial 1" },
    new { Author = "Author 2", Testimonial = "Testimonial 2" },
    new { Author = "Author 3", Testimonial = "Testimonial 3" }
};
// .ToList() if needed, however array supports indexer

string author = arr[i].Author;
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