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Just like C, you can break a long line into multiple short lines. But in Python, if I do this, there will be an indent error... Is it possible?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 67 down vote accepted

From PEP 8 - Style Guide for Python Code:

The preferred way of wrapping long lines is by using Python's implied line continuation inside parentheses, brackets and braces. If necessary, you can add an extra pair of parentheses around an expression, but sometimes using a backslash looks better. Make sure to indent the continued line appropriately. The preferred place to break around a binary operator is after the operator, not before it.

Example of implicit line continuation:

a = some_function(
    '1' + '2' + '3' + '4')

Example of explicit line continuation:

a = '1' + '2' + \
    '3' + '4'
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There is more than one way to do it.

1). A long statement:

>>> def print_something():
         print 'This is a really long line,' \
               'but we can make it across multiple lines.'

2). Using parenthesis:

>>> def print_something():
        print ('Wow, this also works?'
               'I never knew!')

3). Using \ again:

>>> x = 10
>>> if x == 10 or x > 0 or \
       x < 100:
       print 'True'

Quoting PEP8:

The preferred way of wrapping long lines is by using Python's implied line continuation inside parentheses, brackets and braces. If necessary, you can add an extra pair of parentheses around an expression, but sometimes using a backslash looks better. Make sure to indent the continued line appropriately. The preferred place to break around a binary operator is after the operator, not before it.

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This came up during a talk on code style at PyOhio and we came to the conclusion that 2) was a good standard way to go. It's not perfect since changing the text isn't as easy, but at least it reads ok. –  Rick Nov 13 '10 at 16:53
    
I have been looking for #1 example for a long time. –  Vitaly Isaev Mar 24 at 8:03

It works in Python too:

>>> 1+\
      2+\
3
6
>>> (1+
          2+
 3)
6
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As far as I know, it can be done. Python has implicit line continuation (inside parentheses, brackets, and strings) and the indentation of continuation lines is not important. For more info, you may want to read this article on lexical analysis, from python.org.

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3  
Strings only do implicit continuation inside triple-quoted strings. That's the distinction between triple- and single-quoted. –  Ned Batchelder Nov 13 '10 at 12:34

You can also do something like

print('Hello and Welcome!\nSecond Line \nThird Line')
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