Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Good Morning,

I have the following line of code:

 var viewModel = new ClassifiedsBrowseViewModel
        {
            Category = categoryModel,
            Listings = categoryModel.Listings.OrderBy(c => c.Price).ToList()
        };

All is good in the world, and this code works fine. But now I would like to add a switch statement that allows me to change what I am ordering listings by (in the above code it is ordered by price).

So I obviously cannot but the switch statement within the new model deceleration, so I will be putting the switch statement above e.g.:

  switch(searchCriteria)
            {
                case "Price":
                    break;
                case default:
                    break;
            }

So my question is how do I link the two? BTW listing is declared within the ViewModel as:

 public List<Listing> Listings { get; set; }

I thought I could declare a Listings variable in the Controller and then set that variable in the Switch to categoryModel.Listings.OrderBy(c => c.[Search Criteria]).ToList() and then simply have Listings = Listings ?

Many Thanks, J

Using

Using Ribon's Method:

 var viewModel = new ClassifiedsBrowseViewModel
        {
            Category = categoryModel,
            Listings = categoryModel.Listings.OrderBy(c =>
            {
                switch (searchCriteria)
                {
                    case "Price": return c.Price;
                    case "FuelType": return c.FuelType;
                    default: return c.Price;
                }
            }).ToList()
        };
share|improve this question
1  
Why can't you just put that switch into lambda? –  Dyppl Nov 13 '10 at 12:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

IMO a nice, clean and readable solution would be to create an extension method that accepts an IQueryable, and an enumeration which would represent the various ordering options.

public static IOrderedQueryable<Listing> WithListingOrder(this IQueryable<Listing> source, PriceOrderingOptions orderBy)
{
   switch (orderBy)
   {
      case ListingOrderingOptions.Price:
         return source.OrderBy(x => x.Price);
      ... // other enumerations
   }
}

I have a generic ordering extension method (taking a T,TKey), but in your case since your working with a string (search criteria), can't use generics here.

But i think expressing the ordering options as an enumeration should prevent "magic strings".

And use it like this:

var searchCritera = ListingOrderingOptions.Price;

var viewModel = new ClassifiedsBrowseViewModel
        {
            Category = categoryModel,
            Listings = categoryModel.Listings.WithListingOrder(searchCriteria)
            }).ToList()
        };

The main benefit here is your hiding the ugly switch behind the extension - the goal here is to keep your controller clean.

share|improve this answer

You could use your linq statement in your switch statement such as

switch(searchCriteria)
            {
                case "Price":
                    viewModel.Listings = categoryModel.Listings.OrderBy(c => c.Price).ToList()
                    break;
                case default:
                    viewModel.Listings = categoryModel.Listings.OrderBy(c => c.SomeOtherField).ToList()
                    break;
            }
share|improve this answer

I would have:

IEnumerable<Foo> listings = categoryModel.Listings;
switch(sortOrder) {
    case "x":
       listings = listings.OrderBy(l => l.Something);
       break;
    case "y":
       listings = listings.OrderBy(l => l.Whatever);
       break;
}

And then use the listings variable in the model creation:

...
Listings = listings
...

( or listings.ToList() )

share|improve this answer

I know nothing about Linq statements, bu can't you just do the folowing ?

var viewModel = new ClassifiedsBrowseViewModel
        {
            Category = categoryModel,
            Listings = categoryModel.Listings.OrderBy(c => {
                switch (searchCriteria) {
                    case "Price" : return c.Price; break;
                    default: return c; break;
                }
            }).ToList()
        };
share|improve this answer
    
Hey, I have tagged your example onto my original question, if this works then its a great way of solving the problem. No problems there until you add a second case. Are the case's meant to have a break after them? –  JHarley1 Nov 13 '10 at 12:44
    
Yes, totally forgot them, sorry :) It's edited. –  Aurélien Ribon Nov 13 '10 at 13:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.