Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have a 2D array, it is trivial to loop through the entire array, a row or a column by using for loops. However, occasionally, I need to traverse an arbitrary 2D sub-array.

A great example would be sudoku in which I might store an entire grid in a 2D array but then need to analyse each individual block of 9 squares. Currently, I would do something like the following:

for(i = 0; i < 9; i += 3) {
    for(j = 0; j < 9; j += 3) {
        for(k = 0; k < 3; k++) {
            for(m = 0; m < 3; m++) {
                block[m][k] == grid[j + m][i + k];
            }
        }

        //At this point in each iteration of i/j we will have a 2D array in block 
        //which we can then iterate over using more for loops.
    }
}

Is there a better way to iterate over arbitrary sub-arrays especially when they occur in a regular pattern such as above?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The performance on this loop structure will be horrendous. Consider the inner most loop:

        for(m = 0; m < 3; m++) {
            block[m][k] == grid[j + m][i + k];
        }

C is "row-major" ordered, which means that accessing block will cause a cache miss on each iteration! That's because the memory is not accessed contiguously.

There's a similar issue for grid. Your nested loop order is to fix i before varying j, yet you are accessing grid on j as the row. This again is not contiguous and will cache miss on every iteration.

So a rule of thumb for when dealing with nested loops and multidimensional arrays is to place the loop indices and array indices in the same order. For your code, that's

for(j = 0; j < 9; j += 3) {
    for(m = 0; m < 3; m++) {
        for(i = 0; i < 9; i += 3) {
            for(k = 0; k < 3; k++) {
                block[m][k] == grid[j + m][i + k];
            }
        }
        // make sure you access everything so that order doesn't change
        // your program's semantics
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That makes no sense. m should come after i. –  Dialecticus Nov 13 '10 at 14:51
    
@Dialecticus Once m increments in this example, block and grid will become non-contiguous. Incrementing i doesn't have that problem. So we only want to iterate i and k (with k as the priority since it's used by two arrays) before we increment m or j. –  chrisaycock Nov 13 '10 at 14:57
    
Currently because i comes after m you would need to work with three blocks simultaneously. You can't use the same block for three different parts of grid at the same time. –  Dialecticus Nov 13 '10 at 15:01

Well in the case of sudoku couldn't you just store 9 3x3 arrays. Then you don't need to bother with sub arrays... If you start moving to much larger grids than sudoku you would improve cache performance this way as well.

Ignoring that, your code above works fine.

share|improve this answer

Imagine you have a 2D array a[n][m]. In order to loop a subarray q x r whose upper right corner is at position x,y use:

for(int i = x; i < n && i < x + q; ++i)
   for(int j = y; j < m && j < y + r; ++j)
   {
      ///
   }

For your sudoku example, you could do this

for(int i = 0; i<3; ++i)
    for(int j = 0; j < 3; ++j)
       for(int locali = 0; locali < 3; ++locali)
           for(int localj = 0; localkj <3; ++localj)
               //the locali,localj element of the bigger i,j 3X3 square is 
               a[3*i + locali][3*j+localj]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.