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Suppose I have a function named caller, which will call a function named callee:

void caller()
{
    callee();
}  

Now caller might be called many times in the application, and you want to make sure callee is only called once. (kind of lazy initialization), you could implement it use a flag:

void caller()
{
    static bool bFirst = true;
    if(bFirst)
    {
        callee();
        bFirst = false;
    }
}

My opinion for this is it needs more code, and it needs one more check in every call of function caller.
A better solution to me is as follow: (suppose callee returns int)

void caller()
{
    static int ret = callee();
}  

But this can't handle the case if callee returns void, my solution is using the comma expression:

void caller()
{
    static int ret = (callee(), 1);
}  

But the problem with this is that comma expression is not popular used and people may get confused when see this line of code, thus cause problems for maintainance.

Do you have any good idea to make sure a function is only called once?

share|improve this question
    
I'd opt to using a flag - just make sure you don't use idiotic Hungarian notation. :) (overhead of evaluating a boolean is smaller than the overhead of calling a function, anyway) –  eq- Nov 13 '10 at 16:06
    
@eq All cases I listed already make sure the functions is only called once –  Baiyan Huang Nov 13 '10 at 16:09
1  
You could rename ret to call_once (also when an int is returned). –  Peter G. Nov 13 '10 at 16:11
    
Can't you put this check in callee? –  ruslik Nov 13 '10 at 16:14
    
@ruslik I was intending to avoid the check:) –  Baiyan Huang Nov 13 '10 at 16:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Thread-safe:

    static boost::once_flag flag = BOOST_ONCE_INIT;
    boost::call_once([]{callee();}, flag);  
share|improve this answer
    
I asume the first line has to put outside the function? –  Wimmel Nov 13 '10 at 18:04
2  
No, it can be inside the function since it is static. –  ronag Nov 13 '10 at 18:46
    
What is the #include ?? –  mr5 Dec 13 '13 at 2:33

You could use this:

void caller()
{
    static class Once { public: Once(){callee();}} Once_;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Bravo! Nice idea! :) –  Armen Tsirunyan Nov 13 '10 at 16:21
    
Yea, a creative idea, but do you guys think it is better than comma expression? which one would you choose if you want to use in your code? –  Baiyan Huang Nov 13 '10 at 16:25
    
Would this be thread-safe? –  StackedCrooked Nov 13 '10 at 16:39
    
No, it is not thread-safe, but neither are the alternatives in the question. And I would probably use a simple if statement like in the first alternative in the question. See the answer of AndreyT –  Wimmel Nov 13 '10 at 18:06
2  
@StackedCrooked: not thread-safe in C++03, thread-safe in C++0x. –  Matthieu M. Nov 13 '10 at 18:16

Your first variant with a boolean flag bFirst is nothing else that an explict manual implementatuion of what the compiler will do for you implictly in your other variants.

In other words, in a typical implementation in all of the variants you pesented so far there will be an additional check for a boolean flag in the generated machine code. The perfromance of all these variants will be the same (if that's your concern). The extra code in the first variant might look less elegant, but that doesn't seem to be a big deal to me. (Wrap it.)

Anyway, what you have as your first variant is basically how it is normally done (until you start dealing with such issues as multithreading etc.)

share|improve this answer
    
You bring up an very interesting point, let me check it tomorrow with assembly –  Baiyan Huang Nov 13 '10 at 16:39
    
yea, that is what compiler does to add an underlying check! –  Baiyan Huang Nov 15 '10 at 5:42

You could hide the function through a function pointer.

static void real_function()
{
  //do stuff

  function = noop_function;
}


static void noop_function()
{

}

int (*function)(void) = real_function;

Callers just call the function which will do the work the first time, and do nothing on any subsequent calls.

share|improve this answer
    
Good answer, +1, but the use of the static keyword is deprecated in general C++ (in this context, of course, not in classes) and unnecessary in this particular case. Also note that your example won't compile - there's a redundant bracket in your function pointer declaration (definition, actually :) –  Armen Tsirunyan Nov 13 '10 at 16:18

Inspired by some people, I think just use a macro to wrap comma expression would also make the intention clear:

#define CALL_ONCE(func) do {static bool dummy = (func, true);} while(0)
share|improve this answer
    
There is no function call in you code, how will the function be called? –  this Mar 23 at 23:57

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