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Why when comparing a char against another it must be taken also from a string? For example;

This does not work

   while(i < t.length() && zeroCount < 5) {
        if(t.charAt(i) == 0){
            zeroCount++;
        }
        i++;
    }

Nor does this

char zero = 0;

      while(i < t.length() && zeroCount < 5) {
            if(t.charAt(i) == zero){
                zeroCount++;
            }
            i++;
        }

The only way I managed to get it working is like this...

String zeros = "0000000000";

      while(i < t.length() && zeroCount < 5) {
            if(t.charAt(i) == zeros.charAt(i)){
                zeroCount++;
            }
            i++;
        }

Can anyone explain if am doing something wrong, or if it is just not acceptable to do it like the top 2 examples. If so, why?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You're confusing

char zero = 0;

with

char zero = '0';

The former is the null-character (ASCII value of zero), whereas the latter is the character representing the digit zero.

This confusion is a rather unfortunate hang-over from C, with char variables being treated as numbers as well as characters.

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You are looking for the character '0'? Then compare to '0', not 0.

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You're comparing against Unicode value 0 (aka U+0000, the "null" character) - which is not the same as the Unicode character representing the digit 0.

Use '0' instead of 0:

while(i < t.length() && zeroCount < 5) {
    if(t.charAt(i) == '0'){
        zeroCount++;
    }
    i++;
}
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I’m not comfortable with telling people to use charAt: it’s broken by design. –  tchrist Nov 13 '10 at 19:22

Use '0' instead of 0.

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The simple answer is that the value 0 is not the same as the character '0' which has an ASCII code of 48 (IIRC).

You should compare it with the char value charAt(i) == '0' or subtract the char before comparison charAt(i) - '0' == 0

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I don’t think you should tell people to use the old broken charAt method. Too many problems. –  tchrist Nov 13 '10 at 19:23

These other answers have it right, but there’s one very important thing you should know. You should never use chatAt! You should only use codePointAt.

Similarly, you mustn’t blindly use i++ to bump through a string. You need to see whether s.codePointAt(i) > Character.MAX_VALUE to know whether to give an extra i++ kicker.

For example, to print out all the codepoints in a String s in standard "U+" notation:

private static void say_U_contents(String s) { 
    System.out.print("U+");
    for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        System.out.printf("%X", s.codePointAt(i));
        if (s.codePointAt(i) > Character.MAX_VALUE) { i++; }  // UG!
        if (i+1 < s.length()) { System.out.printf("."); }
    }
}

That way you can output like U+61.DF, U+3C3, and U+1F4A9.1F4A9 for the corresponding strings. That last one looks like "\uD83D\uDCA9\uD83D\uDCA9", which is simply insane.

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2  
Your answer is confusing for someone who doesn't know about charsets. For finding 0 (or any BMP character) there is nothing wrong with charAt, or what problems do you mean? –  Ishtar Nov 13 '10 at 22:00
    
@Ishtar: The problems I have are that character counts will be off. Something like "\uD83D\uDCA9\uD83D\uDCA9\u0000\uD83D\uDCA9\uD83D\uDCA9" has only 5 code points in it, with the NUL at number 3. That’s why the Java Pattern ^.....$ matches it: because the Pattern class always deals in logical units, as is proper. –  tchrist Nov 13 '10 at 22:38

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