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I have been doing lots of successful boolean searches however 1 word seems to be stopping it from displaying the expected results.

Below you can see the table structure at the top, with special attention to the tags content for this test product.

alt text

The code in text incase the screenshot is too small:

SELECT 
        id,
        name,
        description,
        price,
        image 
    FROM 
        products 
    WHERE           
        MATCH(tags,name,description)
        AGAINST ('hot*' IN BOOLEAN MODE)

If I do a search for "hot" which is one of the tags, it returns 0 results.

However if I do a search for "drink" which is another tag it finds the product!

I can't seem to understand why!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If I do a search for "hot" which is one of the tags, it returns 0 results.

By default, MySQL does not index (and search) words less than 4 characters long.

Decrease @@ft_min_word_len if you want to index them and rebuild the index.

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2  
How about other dbmses? –  meder Nov 13 '10 at 18:03
    
And as an aside, to @AlexCrooks to test this in your environment, add "bite" to the search terms and try again ("bite" being a four letter word, also "pink", "blue" etc ;] .. but that way you can prove to yourself that this is the problem.) –  jcolebrand Nov 13 '10 at 18:03
    
@meder reading my mind, my second comment was going to be to @Quassnoi ~ Does that apply to MSSQL or ORA or Postgresql? –  jcolebrand Nov 13 '10 at 18:04
    
@drachenstern: no, this is MySQL specifiс limitation, and is only present in default settings. –  Quassnoi Nov 13 '10 at 18:05
    
@drachenstern: However, almost all fulltext engines provide support for stopwords, word breakers and stemmers which can lead to non-obvious false hits/misses. –  Quassnoi Nov 13 '10 at 18:11

Make sure that "hot" is not a stop word (its not a default stop word, but perhaps your mysql implementation has it for some reason?) and that "hot" is not too short of a word (default ft_min_word_len is 4, so words less than 4 letters will be ignored, UNLESS they match with the truncation * operator, so while hot would be ignored, hott wouldn't, see: here)

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